do you see the africa in me

2

Since I’m still struggling to find a decent job I’ve decided to open sketch commissions to help pay the bills. I’m starting off with my prices relatively low just to see how things go.

  • I accept payment through Paypal. Email: duckylaalaa@gmail.com
  • I only do portraits and half body sketches currently. I’ll open up full body sketches if I see a demand for it.
  • I do drawings from all fandoms and OC’s 
  • No gore, sex (nudity is okay) or mecha/robots please
  • Sketches available in Tan, Grey or Black&White at no extra charge.
  • If you have any questions feel free to message me here or email me
  • Also I live in South Africa so please be aware of any timezone differences.
  • Due to being cheated in the past I either need full or at least half payment before I start with your order.

Thank you. If you can’t currently afford a commission but still want to support me please reblog this so that more people can see it. Thank you once again.

“I’m from Senegal, it’s the opposite of here. There everybody respects everybody else. And we believe in community there. There are no homeless people. You’re only homeless if you want to be. Otherwise we take care of each other. If you come over to my house, you can eat whatever, stay as long as you like, it’s no problem. If you see a kid acting up, you can address it. It takes a village. Here kids do and say whatever they want. One day a woman here said to me, ‘Africa is so dangerous, so much war and sickness.’ and I said ‘No, Africa isn’t like that. You’re trying to ignore the things going on right here and put them on Africa. There’s a caste system here. They try to minimize you. They minimize you because you’re African. They minimize you because you’re a woman. And I’m muslim, so that’s another thing.”
"Do you wish you could go back?”
“I go back all the time.”
“So why do you choose to live here with all that you have deal with?”
“I have kids in school here and I want to be here to support them.”

The Signs as The Breakfast Club quotes
  • Aries: I don't think that I need to sit here with you fuckin' dildos anymore!
  • Taurus: I have just as many feelings as you do and it hurts so much when someone steps all over them
  • Gemini: I don't have to run away and live in the street. I can run away and I can go to the ocean, I can go to the country, I can go to the mountains. I could go to Israel, Africa, Afghanistan
  • Cancer: Because it's my business - my personal business.
  • Leo: Do you know how popular I am? I am so popular. Everybody loves me so much at this school.
  • Virgo: You see us as you want to see us - in the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions.
  • Libra: Hey, how come Andrew gets to get up? If he gets up, we'll all get up, it'll be anarchy!
  • Scorpio: I'll do anything sexual, and I don't need a million dollars to do it either.
  • Sagittarius: Did you know without trigonometry, there'd be no engineering?
  • Capricorn: Screws fall out all the time, the world is an imperfect place.
  • Aquarius: Does Barry Manilow know that you raid his wardrobe?
  • Pisces: We're all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it, that's all

sansundertale1  asked:

So I just saw your Portal Musical a few days ago and I love it! All the actors did a phenomenal job and the songs were brilliant! Speaking of the songs, could I get a complete list of what each song was a parody of? There were a couple I recognized (namely the Disney parodies, had to pause once Weatley began "Running the Whole Machine" to fangirl a bit XD) but that's pretty much all I knew.

Thank you!

Good Morning Baltimore, Why Can’t the English, I’m Alive (Next to Normal), Poor Unfortunate Souls, Suddenly Seymour, Friends on the Other Side, Nobody Loves You Like Me, Mr. Cladwell, Trouble (The Music Man), If You Could See Her, A Spoonful of Sugar, I Am Africa, Bombs For Throwing At You (Portal 2), Want You Gone (Portal 2), Do You Hear the People Sing.

Serious question- is it like some sacred pilgrimage for white people, especially white photographers, to go to Tanzania or Kenya and take basic ass photographs of Maasai people? It’s like their trip to the zoo. Look- Maasai jumping! Look Maasai piercing! How often do you see a humanizing photograph? Never.

As an African photographer, it’s SO easy for me to tell when a photograph in ~Africa~ was taken by a non-black and non-African person. It’s always the same shit. Cameras angled down on children, literally looking DOWN on them. Children peering around corners at the camera since they have no fucking clue who this person is waltzing around their community like its a safari. The same basic exotifying shit you would see on the discovery channel of a pack of hyenas with the exhibit this time featuring either the Maasai or the Himba. Poverty pornography. It’s all horrific.

And then I compare that to the work of African photographers like Samuel Fosso, Seydou Keita, Malick Sidibe, Zanele Muholi, Zwelethu Mthethwa, Sabelo Mlangeni, James Barnor and much more. These are the people who inspire me every single day and the core of their work is grace, art and an enduring humanity. When you look at a Keita photograph from Bamako, Mali in the 50s, it’s like you’re having a conversation with that person today. I’m always arrested by his work and that of the other African photography greats.

The photographic work of white people on the continent and non-Africans more broadly, on the other hand, does nothing for me. There is no gentleness, kindness, warmth or- fundamentally- humanity in the works. They just don’t get it or really SEE us and it shows.

There’s no way that anyone can ever tell me that great art about Africa can be made by non-Africans. It just does not compute. The continent has been pillaged for centuries. In addition to robbing us of millions of people (including countless creatives) who were exploited and killed through the slave trade, the artistic labor of our ancestors were also savaged and shipped all over the West (e.g. the Benin Bronzes). You can walk into almost any “Natural History Museum” today and find the fruits of our labor featured next to other stolen antiquities between various wild animal exhibits. When I went to the Brooklyn Museum I was captivated by the incredible indigenous art on display, but also by the exploitation, brutality and colonization which spirited this art away from its home communities all the way to Brooklyn. I hear that the British Natural History Museum is an even more horrifying glorification of colonial exploitation in the form of stolen artwork- including a huge inventory from their former African colonies.

So I honestly find it offensive when non-Africans, especially white people, are running around trying to tell African stories FOR us. Robbing us of our agency like they’ve been attempting to do for centuries now. But in spite of all of this, we rise, we create and we flourish. We create works by and for us and there’s so much power in that… and us! I’m so inspired by African artists from across the diaspora and looking at the amazing work being produced day in and day out it reminds me that we shall overcome in spite of any and all bs.

:)

anonymous asked:

So how important do you think it is to have diverse characters in children's media? I'm not saying it's a bad thing btw!!! I actually am working on a story that involves mythological monsters from all over and a lot of people told me it's a good thing I'm including countries like Africa, Italy, Japan and the Philippines. I mainly did this cause it's usually just Greek mythology we hear about. Do you think kids benefit from hearing more about other countries?

Absolutely!

Not only does it just broaden their knowledge as a whole, but it allows them to see different perspectives they might not have known otherwise

plus obviously, many kids come from cultures we don’t see very often in kids’ media, and seeing their own heritage represented can be hugely important in loving themselves & their culture.

I think diversity is important on all sorts of levels, especially from a young age.

quick poll

this is random but i’m considering volunteering abroad this summer and i’m kind of torn between going to somewhere in africa or somewhere in southeast asia. there are quite a few programs i’m looking at for multiple places but i’ve basically narrowed it down to these two geographic areas. i’m drawn to africa because i’d love to see wildlife and do conservation work, and it’ll be winter there so the temperatures will be a bit cooler than during the summer time (though still pretty hot in some areas). i’m drawn to southeast asia because i just love asia so much and i really want to see temples and that sort of stuff. it’s also cheaper for me to go there/stay longer, buutttt the draw back is that it’s going to be super hot, super humid, and the monsoon season.

WHAT DO YOU GUYS THINK?

should i go see some giraffes and elephants and waterfalls in africa or should i go to a buddhist temple and eat a lot of noodles and teach kids english in southeast asia? 

What are the Songs in Portal 2: The (Unauthorized) Musical Based On?

In order:

-Good Morning Baltimore - Hairspray
-Why Can’t the English Teach Their Children How to Speak - My Fair Lady
-I’m Alive - Next to Normal
-Poor Unfortunate Souls - The Little Mermaid
-Under Attack - ABBA
-Suddenly Seymour - Little Shop of Horrors
-Friends on the Other Side - The Princess and the Frog
-Nobody Loves You Like Me - Jonathan Coulton
-Mr. Cladwell - Urinetown
-Trouble - The Music Man
-If They Could See You - Cabaret
-A Spoonful of Sugar - Mary Poppins
-I Am Africa - The Book of Mormon
-Bombs for Throwing At You - Portal 2
-Want You Gone - Portal 2
-The Turret Opera - Portal 2
-Do You Hear the People Sing - Les Miserables

Done Dating White Guys

Last night I went on a date with a white guy and here are a few of the racist comments he made towards me:

1. The restaurant was dark and he said, “This room is dark! I can barely see you! You match the room!”

2. “Your hair is long! There’s no way that can be your real hair! Don’t tell me you sew that in!”

3. “What kind of music do you like? Oh wait, I know! You love rap!”

4. “So your parents are American? I just assumed they were from Africa!”

5. “You want to try becoming vegan? You can’t do that! You’re black! You love chicken!”

There was more but I’m so fucking upset writing five that I gotta stop. I’m done with white guys. I’m fucking DONE!

@therealjacksepticeye inspires me, not only as a creator, but as a human being. His channel is always a constant source of positivity and happiness in my life. All of these things help me stay determined to LEARN HOW TO DRAW GOSH DARN HUMANS. IT WILL HAPPEN ONE DAY.

Jokes aside, Jack (if you see this), i just want to let you know that there’s yet another fan sitting somewhere in south africa at 5 in the morning that you help make happy. Thank you for all you do, it must be tonnes of work keeping your constant schedule and the majority of your fans happy at the same time. You do you, Jack, cuz you’re the best!

Speedpaint here: https://youtu.be/Gmdb40X2Rak

Child of earth, why do you let yourself drape off the cliffside with the water and moss?


Why do you fall asleep beneath the stars -the stars! - instead of with them?


You are made of nothing else but stardust, iron and copper and hydrogen and magnesium all wrapped together like coffee grounds in a cheese cloth.


Let your veins run untouched, diamonds in Africa, don’t become a slave to the mind. You are boundless, the wild coyote does not hunt the bird.


Listen, listen, listen.


Do you hear that roar? That’s Gaea, beckoning you closer, lost somewhere between the Labyrinth and  the Underworld. She feels your wounds, skin and tissues. 


Sand outside the hourglass, driftwood on the River Styx. Look at your golden reflection in the pool, tell me, what do you see?


Do you see a boy with oak eyes and wheat hair? Freckles under his left eye and a slight scar on his upper lip? You are a padlock, you open for no one. Let your eyes drift with the wind and see where your rose leads you.


The numbers line up like the constellations in the sky, and suddenly you realize comets do collide like you dreamt.


Be your own God,
be your own Savior,
be there for yourself when the earth shatters and you slip through like all the water and coffee grounds and sand,
catch yourself.

—  Z.M. “Spiders Too are Caught in the Webs of Fate” 

For Girls of the Revolution

You make me want to do stupid things.

Like run to the supermarket at 5 a.m.
for a new bag of flour,
because I can’t sleep until I fry you
johnny cake and plantain for breakfast,
just like your manman used to make:

like name my future children Assata and Shabazz,
and already start color-coordinating
their kente cloth headwraps
and black power afro picks:

like pack my bags for the trips I want to give you,
to the Dominican Republic to see the sandcastles
your father built as a child,
to Ghana to see the gate of no return,
where your ancestors raised their shackles,
to Ghana to see the fire lilies
that are still your inheritance.

You make me want to introduce you to my friends
even though we are not dating,
to say Look at this girl!
because Isn’t she lovely?
(I have already shown them pictures,
and the answer is yes.)

You make me want to sing black power anthems
from the top of the South Carolina Statehouse,
waving the pan-African flag
beneath and green and red sun:

to put you to bed with I, too, sing America,
and wake you up with Mwen se samba
Rasin-mwen pa gen tobout,

and write you love songs on the pages
of Malcolm’s autobiography.

This is one of those poems, yes,
this is one of those love songs,
and it’s from the darkness of your eyes
and the fullness of your lips that I draw inspiration.

Yes, we will write the anthem, baby.
We will write the anthem.

Made with SoundCloud
No one is stopping you from wearing african print or clothing. I do not care. But you should know the culture from which what you wear or do comes from. It is out of respect. No one is saying that AA are not from Africa you are..But understand that the Africa that your ancestors knew and the Africa today has changed. And like with anything new, to say that you know it and are apart of it, you must learn. And that is all I am saying you must do. Learn the difference between cultures, learn African history, why because it is your history. But it is also mine, and it is disrespectful for me to see ANYONE claiming that they apart of my culture when they are not. You can become apart of African culture once again like AA once were, but that is not done buy simple buying an outfit, or jewelry. And that is all I am saying. And if you do know the history the culture, good for you!  - from a random blog, I agree      like I remember when I was younger being made fun of for being African and my culture by AA kids and now it’s like a new trend like :/

feel free to state your opinion on the matter

anonymous asked:

I have a problem with the idea that the magic population is so tint in places that Africa only has 1 school and so does North America but all of Europe has 3 schools. It just seems very euro centric and kinda racist to me

TBH, so do I. Oh the one hand, I can get the idea that magical communities started out small, so it’s a lot of home schooling, but since magical communities in Europe were also tight knit, I don’t really see why you’d only have one or two magic users moving to the US at a time. It makes much more sense, to me, that an entire community would up and move, get established (for example, in New York), and then have other magic users learn of that community and move there as well, causing the magical community to grow.

On the other hand, the eleven schools are considered the most prestigious, the “Great Wizarding Schools” of the world, and I guess I can see that?? I just still think there would be more than one in America, again at the very least because you’d have the “American Hogwarts” (Ilvermorny) and “American/Canadian Beauxbaton” based on the number of French settlers who settled the American South and Canada. And that’s just with America, never mind the entire continent of Asia, which based solely on population would have to have more than one school.

I think that might be what gets me that you mentioned; it’s very euro-centric, especially because out of the eleven “Great Wizarding Schools,” almost a third are in Europe. (This is, however, probably true because of colonization and what have you, but I want to believe the Wizarding world would be better than that). 

I realize that for Jo, it would have been more work to design more large schools. And she doesn’t HAVE to provide us with any of it. But if we’re going to have these schools be the best of the best, WHY are there just eleven.

I think my frustration has shifted now from “America would have to have more than one school” (which I’m super glad @ilvermornylibrary corrected me on) and the wand issue to “why does America only have one Great Wizarding school, why is that school basically American Hogwarts AND WHITE, and why aren’t there other ‘long-established and prestigious wizarding schools’ in America, but ESPECIALLY in Asia and what exactly makes these eleven schools so great; what do you have to do to be considered a great school by the International Confederation of Wizards and can other schools become certified.’

But I’m just glad I can talk about my headcanon wand makers, and not have to be ugh that wands are registered.

-Amy (Hufflepuff)

From instagram, I was tagged to show my polishes from my favourite colour family: Red!

Left to Right, Top to Bottom (click for swatches): 

I didn’t include any that I felt leaned too pink or purple. 

I’m curious to see what your favourite colour vs collection is. If you do it, please tag me so I can see :)

xoxo mrstu-beauty

C: As a non-American black woman I need black/African/Afro-American women to understand this: You are more powerful than you know. If you only understood that there are many black women across the globe in Africa and the diaspora that appreciate and respect you. That cherish the work that you do that often goes upraised. That see the ways in which you fight misogynoir and teach them to do the same. Black American women taught me how to love myself. I say this because I was raised by a woman who did not grow up in a radicalized society. 

A woman who loves me but did not understand how and why she needed to teach me to love myself. I learned that from black American women and I know I’m not the only one. There is so much negativity on this page that I need you to know this. I need you to know that you are constantly changing this world for the better and inspiring Black women everywhere how to love themselves. Believe me when I say that there are more Black women in the world who love you than you think. You are some of the only representation that Black women and girls around the world have; That always has and always will mean something.