djemila

I tell myself: I am going to die, but this means nothing, since I cannot manage to believe it and I can only experience other people’s death. I have seen people die. Above all, I have seen dogs die. It was touching them that overwhelmed me. Then I think of flowers, smiles, the desire for women, and realize that my whole horror of death lies in my anxiety to live. I am jealous of those who will live and for whom flowers and the desire for women will have their full flesh and blood meaning. I am envious because I love life too much not to be selfish.
—   Albert Camus - The Wind at Djemila
Yes, I am present. And what strikes me at this moment is that I can go no further – like a man sentenced to life imprisonment, to whom everything is present. But also like a man who know that tomorrow will be the same, and every other day. For when a man becomes conscious of what he is now, it means he expects nothing further.
—  Albert Camus, "The Wind at Djemila,“ Nuptials
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UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Djémila 

This site in northern Algeria was built by the Romans between 96-98 A.D., under the rule of the first of the Five Good Emperors, Nerva. The name “Djémila” is of Berber origin, though it was called “Cuicul” by the Romans. The city itself was built atop mountainous terrain, and the skillfulness with which its builders planned it as to best suit this environment presents an impressive example of Roman ingenuity. Most of its other features - roads, gates, aqueducts, mosaics, temples, and theaters - are common to other Roman city sites.

During the reigns of Antoninus Pius, Commodus, Septimius Severus, and other emperors, more structures were added, and under Caracalla, the town was greatly expanded. As the Roman Empire went into steep decline in the fifth century, the site was gradually abandoned and renamed "Djémila" by the Muslims who reoccupied North Africa and took this city. In 553, the Byzantines won it back, but modern excavation of it did not begin until 1909. It became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1982.

…Never have I felt so deeply and at one and the same time so detached from myself and at so present in the world. Yes, I am present. And what strikes me at this moment is that I can go no further – like a man sentenced to life imprisonment, to whom everything is present. But also like a man who knows that tomorrow will be the same, and every other day. For when a man becomes conscious of what he is now, it means he expects nothing further.
—  “The Wind at Djemila,” Lyrical and Critical Essays - Albert Camus