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Each member of One Direction is now worth at least £50m
The five members of One Direction – all aged 25 or under – are each worth at least £50million. They have sold ten shares in their company, 1D Media, for £70,131,909

As the baby-faced schoolboys nervously shuffled around the X Factor stage, warbling slightly off-key, few could have predicted they would go on to become global superstars.

But seven years on, and all still aged 25 or under, the five members of One Direction are each worth at least £50 million.

A year after announcing their ‘semi-retirement’, Harry Styles, Liam Payne, Louis Tomlinson, Niall Horan and Zayn Malik have sold 10 shares in their company, 1D Media, for £70,131,909 – the equivalent of £14,026,381 each – according to records filed with Companies House.

None of the group ever needs to work again as they are also still rolling in royalties from two of their other companies, Rollcall Touring and PPM.

In addition, each member has gone on to sign lucrative solo record deals, taking their individual worth to £50 million or more each.

Two of the singers – Styles, 23, and Tomlinson, 25 - are also pursuing successful extracurricular ventures in film and television respectively.

Last night a source who worked closely with One Direction said: ‘Almost from the off the boys were extremely canny when it came to matters of the purse.

‘They received sound financial advice straight away, and none of them have been reckless with their earnings.

‘The plan was always to get to this situation, and have the freedom to pursue what they really wanted. In ten years’ time, they could easily be worth £100 million each. It really is quite incredible.’

Undoubtedly the most successful of all the X Factor roster, One Direction were put together on Simon Cowell’s ITV show in 2010.

Although the quintet only came third in the competition – losing out to that year’s winner, Matt Cardle – over 17 million viewers watched the final and the band were immediately signed by Cowell’s Syco label.

One Directions established themselves as teen favourites. Obsessed fans began self-harming when Malik, 24, quit in March 2015, and helplines were set-up when the group declared they were taking a hiatus last January.

They have won six Brit awards and sold over 20 million records worldwide.

They also managed to conquer the notorious tough US market, becoming pin-ups on both sides of the Atlantic.

In 2015 it was revealed the group had earned £105 million over the course of the year, making them the wealthiest boyband in British history, and last year all five members made the Sunday Times under-30 rich list.

The singers have enjoyed the trappings of fame, including numerous five-star holidays, designer wardrobes and, between them, a fleet of luxury supercars.

But they have also invested their money wisely, with properties both here and in America and, in the case of Styles, artwork worth millions.

Last night their representatives declined to comment.  

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I live outside the UK currently, but the order of most reliability/least journalistic slant is as follows:

The Times/The Financial Times (most reliable/least slanted. Reports on governmental goings on and rarely reports on royals except HM) US equivalent: The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal

The Telegraph/The Guardian (reliable but slanted depending on the political party they support. They will report on royals when the royal aides issue a statement. If they can’t get both sides, they usually don’t report.) US equivalent: The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle

The Independent (reliable but very slanted mainly because their party politics) US equivalent: The Los Angeles (LA) Times

The Daily Mail & The Daily Express (extremely slanted, but usually doesn’t outright lie. They may  take a fact, reasonably speculate on the reason behind and write it as fact. These were meant as upmarket gossip rags for the wives of government officials.) US equivalent: People Magazine, Page 6

The Sun/Mirror/Star/Daily Record/Daily Sport (These are the so-called ‘Red Tops’ and flat out make up stories.) US equivalent: US Weekly, Star Magazine, Radar Online, TMZ, Lifestyle, the National Enquirer

You also have your local newspapers which have varying degrees of integrity or reliability, but these listed are national ones.

FYI: In the UK, tabloid is a size (as compared to broadsheets) and originally had nothing to do with journalistic integrity, however, the fact that the Red Top tabloids all publish in the tabloid size has spawned the term “The Tabloid Press” which does concern journalistic integrity and scope of writing. 

Hope this helps.  B.

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wow thank you so much B! :D this helps a lot! ♥

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I got a call from Ali Adler and Andrew Kreisberg, and they were saying, “Hey, we’d really love for you to come in and sit down so we can talk creative with you.” I was like, “Oh, okay, I didn’t realize we were going to do that, that’s great!” I was sitting in their office, and all of a sudden, they’re like, “So, we want to just tell you what we’re thinking, what we’re going to do, and wanted to get your take on it.” They had this funny little smile on their face, I’m like, “What’s going on?” They’re like, “Well, so this season, Alex is gay.” I was like, “Oh, what?” They just went into the whole story, explaining the why behind the what, and that it’s not like this thing that all of a sudden is just spilling out, it’s a discovery for her. That’s how we wanted to approach it. You have so many stories — shows and movies — where people are already established as gay, lesbian, bi[sexual]; these are people who are coming in like that. This was a great opportunity to show somebody who’s figuring it out, the light bulb moment and putting the puzzle pieces together.

When they were explaining it to me, I was like, “Wow, I wouldn’t have thought it,” because last season you just didn’t really see any of that side of Alex. When they originally said, “Hey, we’re thinking about a love interest,” but they didn’t say what the whole thing was, I was almost like, “Oh, I don’t know if we should do that yet,” because I don’t want it to become about Alex in a relationship, where we don’t get to see enough about her discovering more about who she is because so much of it was hidden last season. Then when they started to explain the whole idea, at first I was kind of taken back a little bit, not in a negative way, but just going, “Oh, okay.” Then the weight of it hit me, thinking, “Oooh, okay, we need to really, really do justice to this in a really beautiful way.” It was right around the time of the Orlando shooting, and I just all of a sudden was hit with this weight, because I knew that then I was going to be a face for the LGBT community, and I was like, “I gotta get this right. I don’t want to go out there and say one thing and then do something else. I just want to make sure that this is very respectful and tasteful and being done with sensitivity.

read more on EW.

Terry Gross spoke with New Yorker editor David Remnick and staff writer Evan Osnos about Putin, Trump, and the New Cold War. Here’s an excerpt from that interview about Trump using the phrase “enemy of the people.” 

TERRY GROSS: Trump tweets a lot about the press. On February 17, he tweeted “the fake news media, failing New York Times, NBC News, ABC, CBS, CNN, is not my enemy. It is the enemy of the American people.”

DAVID REMNICK: Yeah, what a phrase, “the enemy of the people.”

GROSS: Yeah, I know. That goes back to Stalin, right?

REMNICK: Well, it goes back to Robespierre. It is an ugly, ugly phrase. I don’t know how self-aware Donald Trump is of that kind of phrase. I guarantee you Steve Bannon knows what enemy of the people means. Stalin used it to keep people terrified. If you were branded a “vrag naroda,” an enemy of the people, you could guarantee that very soon there would be a knock in the middle of the night at your door and your fate would be horrific.

To hear that kind of language directed at the American press is an emergency. It’s an emergency. It’s not a political tactic. And if it’s a political tactic, it’s a horrific one. And that needs to be resisted not just by people like me who are, you know, editors or writers but all of us. This is part of what distinguishes American democracy. And it’s untenable, immoral and anti-American.