dja:press

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Watchdogs urge White House to stop hiding behind “cowardly” bully pulpit and televise briefings

  • It’s time for the Trump administration to stop “hiding behind the bully pulpit” and meet the press — on camera — according to a major good government group.
  • Washington watchdog organization Common Cause called out the White House press office on Tuesday for refusing to allow broadcasting of the daily briefing session with the media.
  • “The camera and live audio bans are part of a disturbing pattern out of the Trump administration to attack institutions that serve as a check on power,” the non-partisan organization, which claims more than 700,000 members nationwide, said in a letter addressed to White House press secretary Sean Spicer. Read more (6/27/17)
thesun.co.uk
One Direction may reunite to charity single for victims of London tower block
ONE Direction could have a mini-reunion after Simon Cowell asked all of the band to sing on his charity single for the Grenfell Tower disaster. Liam Payne and Louis Tomlinson were officially confir…

ONE Direction could have a mini-reunion after Simon Cowell asked all of the band to sing on his charity single for the Grenfell Tower disaster.

Liam Payne and Louis Tomlinson were officially confirmed to be recording lines for the celeb cover of Bridge Over Troubled Water.

Harry Styles and Niall Horan are trying to free up their schedules to take part.

The group have been on a break since early 2016, with all four members recently embarking on solo careers.

Yesterday, several music stars started the three-day recording of the record, with Paloma Faith, Craig David and James Blunt all spotted entering the West London recording studio.

More names pledged their support for the track overnight including Rita Ora, Robbie Williams, Leona Lewis and Gareth Malone.

Lily Allen, Skepta, Stormzy, James Arthur and others have already been confirmed.

A source said: “If all four [One Direction] came on board, it would be as solo acts as Liam has to record in the US.”

It comes after Paloma Faith blasted the Government for not doing enough to help victims.

The singer, who visited the devastating scene hours after the blaze took hold, said: “I don’t think £5million even touches the side.”

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Press associations are pushing back after Donald Trump’s Twitter threats

  • Trump’s Friday threat to scratch the White House daily press briefing had skeptics calling it another attempt to distract the media.
  • Navel-gazing reporters, some social media pundits said, would rush to make the headlines about a threat to their own work. That would give Trump a break from a barrage of stories about James Comey and Russia.
  • Actual threat or merely hot air, professional journalism associations took the president’s remark seriously all the same. Read more (5/12/17)
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Senate leadership restricts reporter access in Capitol, as GOP writes health care bill in secret

  • An apparent last-minute rule change by Senate leadership caught Capitol Hill reporters off-guard on Tuesday, when they found themselves blocked from asking senators questions on camera in the hallways of the Capitol without explicit permission, according to multiple reports.
  • The new directive is a stark change from regular order in the Capitol, where credentialed reporters are traditionally given the same access to hallways and public spaces as Capitol Hill staff.
  • Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.), chair of the Rules Committee that reportedly made the decision, denied that any rules had changed. Read more (6/13/17 1:45 PM)
youtube

New interview with Laura, Jacob, Tom, and Zendaya

rollingstone.com
Harry Styles Emulates Folk-Rock Heroes at Intimate Los Angeles Gig
Harry Styles was joined onstage by Stevie Nicks Friday night at Los Angeles' Troubadour, a gig that marked the singer's first full U.S. concert.

“Tonight is maybe the best night of my life,” Harry Styles confessed Friday, facing an excited crowd of fans and friends gathered to hear the songs of his just-released solo debut, Harry Styles. The intimate club performance unfolded at the Troubadour, the celebrated West Hollywood room where some of his folk-rock heroes from the Seventies performed early career-defining gigs.

The erstwhile One Direction singer walked out as casually as anyone can in golden glitter pants. He picked up an electric guitar to begin “Ever Since New York,” a ballad warm and jangly, to an audience of raised cell phones. He winced dramatically to the lyrics of bitter love (“Almost over / Had enough from you”), ending with a fan sing-along to the repeated closing line: “Oh, tell me something I don’t already know.”

The album wasn’t the obvious move for the pop idol, but is now fully expected to debut at Number One on the Billboard 200 album chart. The concert at the 500-capacity Troubadour was a night to celebrate (and a benefit for homeless teens), while a crowd of mostly female fans not lucky enough to score a ticket stood outside waiting behind a barricade, maybe hoping for a glimpse of Styles, guest James Corden or anyone else.

At 23, Styles has launched a solo career to genuine acclaim, drawing less on the immediate pop of his multi-platinum boy band than lessons learned from the rock and pop past. His new songs show the direct influence of Bowie, Elton John, the Stones, Lennon & McCartney, and many others. The results that aren’t revolutionary in 2017 but are emotionally resonant, and suggest a healthy foundation of taste and ambition.

At the Troubadour, the percussive piano on “Woman” began like Elton’s “Bennie and the Jets.” The folky glimmer of his “Meet Me in the Hallway” shimmered like Bowie’s “Space Oddity.” His “Only Angel” snarled with Stonesy guitars and fittingly brutal beats and cowbell from drummer Sarah Jones.

By the time Stevie Nicks stepped out as his surprise guest for a trio of duets, Styles had traveled comfortably through a variety of styles. “You look pretty wonderful,” Styles said almost shyly as Nicks arrived at the mic. She replied, “So do you.”

“Nicks wore black and sang harmony on Styles’ "Two Ghosts,” a dreamy tune that could be Beck in sad singer-songwriter mode. Nicks looked over at her singing partner and blended her voice with his: “We’re just two ghosts standing in the place of you and me / Trying to remember how it feels to have a heart beat.”

They followed with Fleetwood Mac’s classic “Landslide,” trading lyrics and admiring glances. Young women in the crowd shouted along to Nicks, but turned silent when Styles delivered his lines, which were his most gentle and reverent of the night. When Nicks paused to share some history about “Landslide,” Styles stepped back to sit and listen like the rest of the room, then joined her on one more song, “Leather and Lace.”

For much of the 80-minute set, Styles’ demeanor was as casual as if he were hosting a cocktail party in his living room, at ease with fans shouting ecstatically to his every syllable. With him were not a band of session players but a group of young musicians and peers, including guitarist Mitch Rowland, who was still working at a pizza shop when recruited by Styles as a player and co-writer on the album.

Together, they charged into “Kiwi,” a grinding rocker in the tradition of the Strokes or Jet, sending Styles bouncing around the stage, leaning into the front rows, punching the air.

“Unfortunately I only have one album, so we’ve only got one song left,” he said with a laugh near the end of the night. “We’ve quite literally run out of material.”

He then turned to the band and suggested performing “Kiwi” once more, as many in the crowd erupted. The band dove back into the rocker, and it was just as convincing, the song and energy clearly a sweet spot for Styles. When it was done, he asked, “Do it again?”

Instead, Styles closed with the emotionally lush “Sign of the Times,” already a career-defining song for the new solo artist. It wasn’t a casual reading. His voice soared and shifted gracefully between tenor and falsetto, retaining the epic song’s solemn gospel flavor (even without the album’s accompanying choir).

Like “Kiwi,” the tune tapped into something real in the singer, lifting him far beyond casual charmer and into passionate performer. Which might the greatest lesson of all from the musical heroes of the rock and pop past.

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Kara and Maggie (Floriana Lima) must work together to save the woman they love. “What’s interesting is it’s really an episode about jurisdiction,” executive producer Andrew Kreisberg tells EW. “It’s really a Maggie-Kara episode. It starts with them at loggerheads about, where does the police’s jurisdiction end and where does Supergirl’s begin? They’re on opposite sides of that. Maggie is obviously more for the police and Supergirl is more for Supergirl.”

Who gets to make the decisions to save Alex: The sister or the girlfriend?” Kreisberg continues. “It’s great because neither of them are right and neither of them are wrong, and they both love her and both want her back. It’s just a question of who’s willing to do what to bring that about?”

Of course, Alex won’t go silently into the night, either. “When we decided to do an episode about Alex getting kidnapped, we knew that Alex Danvers is nobody’s victim,” Kreisberg says. “Even though she’s trapped, Alex does two very impressive things to try and escape and help ensure her survival, so that’s really cool.”

read more at EW.com

youtube

Spider-Man: Homecoming press conference