diy fragrance

New Witch FAQ

Hello Lovelies, 💜

We’ve been getting questions from some people who are interested in Witchcraft. So, here are our answers! 

                       ⭐  Hope this helps you in your journey! ⭐

Please don’t feel embarrassed because, honestly, we are all learning.


◻️ Am I doing this (Witchcraft) right ? 

Yes, yes, and yes. To be completely honest, sometimes I’m unsure if I’m doing things right too. I’m not sure if I invoked the right kind of attention, or reaction, but I trust that my intentions were seen for what they were. Then you carry on from there.

 The whole point of witchcraft, is to learn from experience and from your research and study. There is no one, definite way to do anything. It is entirely your choice. Literally everything from how to cast a circle, to deciding when you’re ready to make spells; It’s all you. 


◼️ What should I study first ?

What interests you? Make up? Fragrances? Food? DIY? Stars? Plants? The Ocean? Sweetheart, the world is yours to research. If you’re interested in anything, study it to the point you basically earned your doctorates in that subject. 

And, Yes, it’s alright to study something then ditch it to study something else, you are never required to finish any one study before continuing on to another. 


◻️ Do I have to have a Book of Shadows/ Grimoire ?

No, You don’t have to have a book at all.

You can literally have dozens of random pages stuffed in a binder, or hundreds of sticky notes on your old Cat in the hat book from your childhood. 

 Although many people do have one to keep track of their knowledge, if you feel better just keeping your information in a small notebook, along with your to-do list. It’s perfectly fine. 


◼️ I want to start a Book of Shadows/ Grimoire but I don’t wanna mess up, what should i do ?

S W E E T H E A R T, You are preaching to the choir here

We totally understand that feeling, and you’re not alone. Kinara literally kept restarting her book for a week, because of how badly simple mistakes bothered her. 

Honestly,  just combat this by not getting an expensive book in the first place. Try using a sketch book, imagine that as your draft book of shadows until you get comfortable/ confident enough to start writing in your actual book. 

You can totally still buy that expensive dream-book of yours, just remember that your book is meant to symbolize your growth, confidence in your craft, and journey through this whole process.

Also, ALWAYS, write in pencil first  before inking anything, and if you happen to be a perfectionist; get a ruler. ( Trust me, it makes things way easier )

◻️ Do I need to have a dazzling altar ?

Honey, as much as you see these beautiful altars on tumblr/instagram…the reality is that most of us are broke. ( and some have extra cash to burn)

We’ve had times where we’d had to decide whether to buy food that day or fork up the money to be responsible adults.(Growing up was a trap, Peter Pan was right)

Kinara’s altar literally consists of a diffuser, and two opalite heart stones that she got on a vacation 2 years ago. You can honestly even debate on whether that counts or not, but that’s the gospel truth, babes.

◼️ What kind of witch am I?

Anything you want. Honestly you can be literally any kind of witch you please, because it’s so diverse that you can either find a clique that interests you OR just go with your own flow and call it a day. 

Kinara: I love the ocean, I was born on an island and grew up adoring the forest. So i feel that in my heart, I was born a Sea witch who fell in love with the forest. I still am unsure how to classify myself other than Eclectic. ( which basically means diverse )

◻️ Do I have to worship/ work with a God / Goddess? 

Nope! You choose your path, and you go with what makes you comfortable. 

Kinara: I personally don’t work with any gods/goddesses. Only because I feel that these Gods/Goddesses came to be, because people wanted a shorter way to encourage/invoke specific traits that these gods/goddesses represent. 

Of course, I don’t mean to lessen their worth or value, I just feel that what they represent is something I feel more comfortable following. 

◼️ Can I have an Altar if I don’t worship/ work with Gods/Goddesses?

Yes! You can use your altar to honor the Sabbaths. Or if you want a sacred space to practice your craft, it’s perfect for that also. 

Witchcraft is very easy going, very ‘go-with-the-flow’ and super forgiving since we’re constantly learning what it means to us as individuals.

 As a whole, we can agree that it’s a great way of life, and a way to really get your mind going. Everything is connected, and we are just a part of this giant design with marvelous purpose!


💥 Well those are the main ones, Please feel free to message us with any questions! 💥


~ Kinara

2

Quick and Easy Green and Blue Gradient Nail Art

For this look, I just sponged OPI My Gecko Does Tricks over China Glaze Manhunt. Super easy took about 20 minutes. And, featuring as an accessory, my favorite perfume ever Indigo by Nest Fragrances. The bottle itself is a work of art!

anonymous asked:

I really wanted a Scentsy Buddy (a plush with a zipper for scent packs)... but they have a plush supporting Autism speaks. :( My favorite sensory thing is plush things and smells... any ideas?

As far as I’m aware, only sales of that plush contribute towards A$. However, if you don’t want to touch a company that has any connection with A$, I absolutely do not blame you - it’s all about our individual comfort level, and we have the right to feel good about the stim toys we buy.

I do have ideas, though, about DIY alternatives, and @pink-rainbow-sparkles and @thesensorybox have posted on very good alternatives available in Australia and New Zealand.

If you don’t want a weighted plush, the simplest solution is to literally drop essential oils on a plushie/soft toy you already own. Some essential oils like lemongrass are yellow-tinted and will stain; other essential oils, like lavender, tea tree or peppermint, are clear and won’t stain. (I’ve been dropping lavender on my pillow at night, to help me sleep, for four or five years. You wouldn’t know it to look at my pillow or pillow case.) If you want to change the scent, wash the toy and add a new oil. (My pillow case does not smell of lavender after machine washing, and I use fragrance-free laundry powder.)

If you want more info on which essential oils don’t stain, I’ll gladly go through my oil collection and swatch test them for you, but I’ve been dropping lavender oils on my weighted soft toys to refresh their scent and there is absolutely no staining. None. Do use pure essential oils and not oils blended with a carrier oil, though, or else you might make your toy tacky or greasy to touch.

(Note: I have no idea about the stainability of perfume/fragrance oils when dripped on fabric, because I don’t use them. Can anyone advise on this?)

The other options involve using weighted heat bags inside a plush animal case, very similar to the Scentsy toys. These toys are a cover designed to contain a rice or wheat bag that you remove, microwave and then replace, so they’re ideal for the switchable scent pack function.

@thesensorybox wrote this post on how to find them in K-Mart stores; @pink-rainbow-sparkles wrote this post on how they use their unicorn, also from K-Mart. There’s several different ones listed on K-Mart’s website, $9 AUD. Big W, another Australian department store, also has several different kinds, also $9 AUD. The bunny looks really cute!

I checked out Amazon, but I was having trouble finding toys with the removable pouch, since that is part of the function we want here. I’d recommend checking out your local department store. If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, it may be harder to find these as you’re moving out of cold weather. My local department stores, albeit with less stock, did have them throughout the summer just gone, so I’d consider it worth a look.

If you want the switchable scent pack function, for different scents, you’ll likely need to make or buy packs of a similar size to swatch them out, and either scent those packs with essential oils or fill them with a scented filler (dried herbs, lavender heads) in addition to stuffing or something weighted (rice, seeds, grains, soup mix, dried beans, poly pellets). You can scent rice very easily by tossing it in a container (an old ice-cream tub works well) and adding a few drops of oil, and I’ve scented plastic poly pellets the same way with no problems. I’ve also mixed poly/soft toy stuffing with dried lavender heads with no problems, just by layering: one layer of stuffing, one layer of lavender, etc.

The wheat packs, if you make several, are no different from a bean bag (two tutorials linked on this post). Cut two pieces of fabric the size of the bag inside the toy (usually a rectangle or a square), sew or glue up three edges, fill with scented rice or wheat or weighted pellets (if you’re not going to heat it, it doesn’t matter what you use) and sew or glue closed the fourth edge, making a sealed-shut pocket. Since it goes inside the toy, it doesn’t even have to be neat - just keep your stitches small enough that the inside filler can’t come out. The seams can be as messy as you like!

You can also refresh this pouch with a few drops of essential oil, and because it goes inside the toy, you can even use those oils that stain, as you won’t see the inner pouch.

If you don’t mind rustling plastic, you could even use several ziplock bags to contain the scented filler. I’d recommend using the thinner, cheaper kind, as the smell of the oil will seep through the plastic more easily. (I never find one ziplock bag to contain scent all that well, but the cheaper ones are much worse at it, which is what we want!)

Either way, it’s a little involved if you want to have the multiple scent options. Just dripping a toy with essential oils is the easiest, but it will still involve the purchase of several oils. (This said, oils last a long time and you can use them for scented necklaces, slimes, burning in oil burners, bean bags, personal care, cleaning…) The heat-up pocket plush toy will require sewing or gluing, and the purchase of fabric (or ziplock bags), bag fillers and oils. I can’t find a way that’s less complicated, because I don’t think perfumes and body sprays will last as long as essential oils, in terms of the filler or plush toy holding the scent.

If anyone has any suggestions, or a supplier for something similar that isn’t Scentsy, by all means, suggest away!

ETA: @ninjacacti says,

a good scent thing that isn’t oils are tea bags! they never stain and last a super long time I have a little pocket I’ve sewn on teddy bear that sits in my bed with a tea bag in it and it works great! if you can’t sew or just don’t like it you can get Velcro or just glue

Oh, very cool thought! It’d be so easy to remove and replace different tea bags from the heat bag soft toys! Thank you!

ETA the second: @2hon5 says,

Also, if you don’t have the spoons or motor function to sew or glue your own bean/rice bags, you can use those little zipper wallets. Just make sure the zipper is entirely plastic (no metal) if you’re going to microwave it. If you can’t find one like that, you can always use a sock and fill it up, tie it off, microwave it, and put it in the plushie.

I bow before your genius. Seriously. Very, very good suggestions. Especially the sock one, because that’s so simple and accessible. Thank you.          

2

To make the DIY Lavender Bubbles, you only need a few simple ingredients:

A bubble container

Pipe cleaners

Lavender scented dish soap

Sugar Food Coloring

To make the Lavender Bubbles: Combine 4 cups of warm water with ½ cup of sugar. Once the sugar is completely dissolved, add ¾ cup of the lavender dish soap. Add 1 drop of blue food coloring and 3 drops of red food coloring Store in an air tight container To make the DIY bubble wand: Create a circle near one end of the pipe cleaner and twist any extra around the stem of the pipe cleaner (so easy!).

DIY Natural Room Scents

Fragrant items for naturally scenting your home:

  • Citrus — I’ve tried other fruits. Some of them smell good initially, but they don’t hold up for more than one use. Citrus is sturdier, longer-lasting, and gives these scent recipes freshness. Lemons and oranges are particularly fragrant and have the best staying power in these scented waters.
  • Herbs — Any herb can be used for making a room scent, but the ones that are sturdier and on woody twigs hold up the best. My favorites for room scents are rosemary and thyme.
  • Pine or cedar twigs/needles — There may be other fragrant trees that will work, too; pine and cedar are the two I’ve tried for their appealing, fresh fragrance.
  • Extracts — A touch of vanilla or almond extract improves most room fragrance mixtures. Mint extract has a nice fresh scent.
  • Spices — You can use ground or whole sweet spices. The whole spices look prettier, if your scented water will be in a location where it will be seen. I have found that cinnamon sticks and whole cloves have the most scent staying power. Cinnamon sticks can be rinsed off and reused several times. They keep on giving.

Five Natural Room Scent Recipes

These are all scents that my nose likes. But, scents that are pleasing to one person may not be to someone else. Consider how many different scents of perfumes, soap, and candles there are in stores in an effort to appeal to the masses. So, use my recipe combos as guidelines that you can tweak and customize to suit what your nose likes.

General procedure: Combine the ingredients in a 2 cup (pint) jar or container, or in a pan on the stove top. Cover them with water and heat. I’ll explain different heating options further down. Keep reading.

Scent #1: Oranges, cinnamon & cloves (allspice and anise are optional). This is my favorite, both for it’s wonderful aroma and for it’s staying power. This scent carries into multiple rooms better, and it can be reheated to scent your rooms for several days.

Scent #2: Lemon, rosemary, & vanilla. A similar scented water is often simmering in Williams-Sonoma stores. It has a lovely freshness to it.

Scent #3: Lime, thyme, mint & vanilla extract. This combination has such a fresh, pleasant scent. I initially made it without the mint extract, but have found that it really kicks up the aroma.

Scent #4: Orange, ginger (fresh or powdered), and almond extract. This is a sweet, delicious scent.

Scent # 5: Pine or cedar twigs (or other fragrant twigs), bay leaves, and nutmeg. These scents combine for a complex aroma. If you have whole nutmeg, use a microplane to grate off the outer surface–this will release the scent. Add the whole nutmeg piece along with the gratings.

Here’s the gang of five. Aren’t they beautiful? I like to make these up in pint jars and keep them on hand in the fridge so I’m ready to start a pot of simmering scents as needed.

Make ahead and…

  • …store in the fridge. Uncooked jars of scented waters will keep in the fridge for 1 to 2 weeks, so you can make these ahead to have on hand. I recommend adding all of the ingredients, including the water, to the jars before refrigerating them. I’ve tried refrigerating the fruit/spice/herb combos in jars without the water, but they don’t last as long that way.
  • …freeze them.  I’ve tried freezing them both with and without the water added, and both ways work fine. I haven’t tested them in the freezer longer than 2 weeks, but I’m confident that they can be frozen for a month or longer. Make sure you use freezer-safe jars. (Not all mason jars are freezer-safe.)

How to heat the scented mixtures

I’ve tried a variety of methods, and all of these work to varying degrees. Some of them provide a more powerful scent than others. Just like the air fresheners you buy, none of these will scent a whole house; but I’ll show you some ways to set up individual scent sources in multiple rooms. Hopefully you already have what you need to try out one or more of these options.

Stove top method. This is by far the best way I’ve found to get the most powerful scent that will spread to more rooms the fastest. It’s easy as can be. Simply combine the ingredients in a pot on the stove, bring them to a boil, and then lower the heat to a simmer. They will immediately begin to scent your kitchen and spread to other rooms. How far the scent spreads depends on the size and layout of your house. A simmering pot like this makes all four rooms on our first floor smell good. The only drawback of this method is that you have to keep a close eye on the water level. If the pan dries out, you’ll be smelling burned citrus instead of sweet, fragrant citrus.  NOTE: For a stronger scent, simply double or triple the recipe in a larger pot on the stove.

Uncovered Slow Cooker Method. This is my personal favorite for having my house smell pleasant every day. I use a mini slow cooker–the kind made for keeping dips and sauces warm. Mine only has one low heat setting. The mixture never actually bubbles and visibly steams. I leave it uncovered on my kitchen counter to slowly release scent throughout the day. It’s subtle, but creates a pleasant smell in the house. When I’m home, I keep my mini slow cooker going. It’s easy and uses very little electricity. When I fill mine in the morning, it won’t dry out for an entire day. If you’re concerned about accidentally letting it run dry, you can put a lamp timer on it so that it automatically shuts off at the desired time. I put a scented jar mixture in the microwave for 2 minutes to get it really hot before I add it to the slow cooker. That gives it a jump start on releasing the scent.  NOTE: For a stronger scent, simply double or triple the recipe in a larger, full-size slow cooker.

Fondue Pot Method. If you have a fondue pot, then you have a portable scent station. Set it up in any room you’d like to scent. Below is a small ceramic fondue pot I have that uses a tea light for heat. So, this will only remain warm as long as the candle lasts–3-½ to 4 hours. Like the slow cooker, this is a low level of heat and releases a very subtle scent–enough for a small room. Get the scent mixture boiling hot before adding it to the fondue pot. I like to set this up in our entry way when we have guests. It makes it smell wonderful when you walk through our front door. And, it looks pretty.

Mug Warmer Method. I normally keep this little mug warmer next to my computer to keep my coffee and tea warm. I’ve discovered it also can be used to keep a jar or small bowl of scent mixture warm. It only keeps it warm, it doesn’t actually heat it up. So again, be sure to heat the mixture before adding it the bowl. Or microwave a jar and set it right on top of the mug warmer. This low heat puts off a soft scent that is perfect in a bathroom.

  • Here’s a hint to keep it pretty. As the mixtures cook and lose their color, they’re not as attractive. You can spruce it up by floating a fresh slice of citrus on top. Or add a few cranberries (I keep a bag of them in my freezer); they float and add a touch of color.

Candle Warmer Method. These work just like the mug warmers. Candle warmers come with a little bowl on top for melting scented candle pellets. Instead, you can add some heated scented water. Or, remove the bowl and set a jar or other bowl on top.

  • Note: I tested the temperatures of these with a thermometer. The mug warmer and candle warmer both kept the mixture at about 120°F. That’s enough to let off a very subtle scent, but don’t expect these to strongly scent a big room. You need more heat and steam for a stronger scent.

Tea Pot Warmer Method. My tea pot warmer also uses tea lights. I can put two or three tea lights in mine to achieve the temperature I want. These only last as long as the tea lights burn, but they can get hotter than the mug and candle warmers, thus releasing more scent. I can put a bowl or jar on top of my tea pot warmer, as long as I put it somewhere that I can keep an eye on it. I don’t like to leave candles unattended.

Add more hot water as needed. As the water evaporates from any of these warming bowls or jars, top it off with additional HOT water. It needs to be hot when it’s added so that it doesn’t cool down the temperature of the scented water.  Higher heat = more fragrance.

Gift them! These make a fun, unique hostess gift. Take one along to a party as a gift for your host that can be simmered and enjoyed the next day.

Reuse each mixture 2-3 times. After these have been heated and simmered for awhile, the water becomes cloudy (as you can see in the jars below), and some of the ingredients lose their vibrant color. Although they don’t look as pretty, they still smell good. Usually, you can reheat and simmer these again 2-3 times. Jar them up and refrigerate them between uses. Open the jar and give it the sniff test–if it still smells good, reheat and reuse it. Add more water as needed.

Cost saving tips

You can save, use and reuse a number of fragrant ingredients. These scents don’t need to be expensive.

  • Leftover ginger —  If you ever cook with fresh ginger and end up with leftover pieces , this is a way to use them up before they spoil. Slice the leftover ginger and freeze it in a bag or container to have on hand for whipping up a quick batch of scented water.
  • Save your orange peels – When you eat an orange, save the peel for use in scented waters. Store them in the refrigerator or freezer until you need them.
  • Save your juiced lemons and limes – After you’ve juiced these for use in a recipe, refrigerate or freeze the leftover pieces.
  • Save your leftover herbs – If you have herbs in a garden or have leftover herbs that you’ve purchased for cooking, they can be frozen and saved for use in these scented waters.
  • Use expired juices. If you have fruit juices that are past their prime, use them as a base in place of the water in these mixtures. They’re both fragrant and colorful.
  • Use expired spices. Spices are supposed to be replaced after a year, because they lose much of their flavor. But, they still smell good! Instead of throwing out old spices, use them for scenting water.

There are endless combinations for these scented waters. If you have some additional ideas, please share. I’m always looking for a new, pleasant scent for my home.

Natural Room Scents By Monica Ingredients
  • Citrus, sliced — lemons, oranges, limes (may use peel only, if preferred)
  • Herbs — rosemary, thyme, & bay leaves
  • Spices– whole cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, allspice (optional), anise (optional); may substitute ground/powdered spices
  • Ginger (fresh or powdered)
  • Extracts–vanilla, almond, mint
  • Pine twigs (or other fragrant twigs)
Directions Use a pint (2 cup) jar, container, or pot to combine scent waters. Add ingredients to container, cover with water, and choose from these options:
–simmer on stove top, topping off with more water as it evaporates
–add heated mixture to a slow cooker, fondue pot, or something similar that will keep mixture heated. Preheat waters to a boil (in microwave or on stove top). As water evaporates, always top it off with HOT water to keep the temperature as high as possible. Higher heat = more fragrance.FRAGRANT COMBINATIONS:1. Orange, Cinnamon & Spice. 1 orange, 2 cinnamon sticks (or 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon), ½ tablespoon whole cloves (or 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves), ½ tablespoon whole allspice (or ¼ teaspoon ground allspice), 1 anise star (optional)

2. Lemon, Rosemary & Vanilla. 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary, 2 lemons, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract.

3. Lime, Thyme, Mint & Vanilla. 3 limes, 3-4 sprigs fresh thyme, ½ teaspoon mint extract, 1 teaspoon vanilla.

4. Orange, Ginger, & Almond. 1 orange (or peel from 2 oranges), 1 4″ finger of ginger, sliced (or 1 tsp ground ginger), ½ teaspoon almond extract.

5. Pine, Bay Leaves, & Nutmeg. Handful of pine twigs or needles, 4 bay leaves, 1 whole nutmeg, outer layer grated into mixture.

Scented waters may be refrigerated between uses. Reuse for 2-3 days, or as long as they still have a pleasant fragrance.