dividuals

Kids today are dividuals. They’re divided human beings. They see themselves as bricks within systems. ‘I’m this person in the morning, this person in the afternoon, this person at school, I’m this person on Facebook, I’m this person on Twitter.’

They experiment and have lots of different personalities. The more personalities you can handle in one body, the more the winner you will be. Because the more fascinating you will be as a person.

They have no problem at all changing their personality. This exactly why kids love to take drugs; even legal ones. They don’t believe in a sober ego that’s always there on Monday morning, reminding them who they really are. There is no 'who you really are’ anymore; there are a lot of different 'who-I-can-bes’. And you want more who-I-can-bes to choose from.

—  Alexander Bard

“We no longer find ourselves dealing with the mass/individual pair. Individuals have become "dividuals,” and masses, samples, data, markets, or "banks.“ Perhaps it is money that expresses the distinction between the two societies best, since discipline always referred back to minted money that locks gold as numerical standard, while control relates to floating rates of exchange, modulated according to a rate established by a set of standard currencies. The old monetary mole is the animal of the space of enclosure, but the serpent is that of the societies of control. We have passed from one animal to the other, from the mole to the serpent, in the system under which we live, but also in our manner of living and in our relations with others. The disciplinary man was a discontinuous producer of energy, but the man of control is undulatory, in orbit, in a continuous network.”

Postscript on the Societies of Control, Deleuze

The numerical language of control is made of codes that mark access to information, or reject it. We no longer find ourselves dealing with the mass/individual pair. Individuals have become “dividuals,” and masses, samples, data, markets, or “banks.” Perhaps it is money that expresses the distinction between the two societies best, since discipline always referred back to minted money that locks gold as numerical standard, while control relates to floating rates of exchange, modulated according to a rate established by a set of standard currencies.