diversity media

anonymous asked:

Am I the only one who hates it when people try to recommend shows/movies by only talking about how diverse they are? I mean, I certainly do see the need for more diversity in show business, but saying "there's a x character" doesn't really tell me anything about the actual quality of said show/movie. If I'm going to watch something I want to know about its genre, its tone, its quality of writing etc. "Its diverse" doesn't tell me any of that and is honestly not enough to make me want to watch it

It’s also extremely patronizing.

I’m tired of ~diversity~ meaning the core white people are safe while the poc get cycled in and out and tortured and sidelined, the lgbt characters can’t have happy relationships and the women can’t interact for more than five minutes. I’m tired of white people and straight people and men patting themselves on the back for regurgitating the same bullshit tropes and calling it art.

STOP TELLING WOC TO WAIT FOR THEIR TURN!

franchise films carried by white actresses

franchise films carried by actresses of color….

time.com
Behind the TIME Cover Story: Beyond 'He' or 'She'
How a new generation is changing the meaning of gender and sexuality
By Katy Steinmetz

In a new survey from LGBTQ advocacy organization GLAAD, conducted by Harris Poll, those open minds are reflected in the numbers: 20% of millennials say they are something other that strictly straight and cisgender, compared to 7% of boomers.

okay so I was going through some old stuff and I found this book from a series called “Amy Hodgepodge” that I bought around 2009 or 2010

and I vaguely remembered something special about it so I opened it up and

(it’s a bit hard to read, so here’s the part that I mainly want to focus on: “I laughed, knowing she was only kidding. Lola has a great sense of humor. She’s the one who came up with my nickname: Amy Hodgepodge. My real name is Amy Hodges. But when Lola found out that I’m African American, White, Japanese, and Korean, she said my name should be Amy Hodgepodge. Lola and her twin brother, Cole, are mixed-race, too. So are some of my other friends. But Lola says nobody is as mixed as me!”)

This girl is African American, white, Japanese, AND Korean.

I remembered how weird being both Vietnamese and white was for me when I was little. I didn’t know any other part Asian, part white kids (and I specify Asian because I did know one or two kids that were part black, but I didn’t talk with them that much), and I had never read about anyone like me in any of the books I had ever read… until these.

Curious to learn more about the series, I decided to Google it. This is the home page of amyhodgepodge.com:

“Some kids were mean and teased me about looking different, which really made me sad.”

These kids books just briefly tackled racism without actually saying the word “racism” or “racist”.

Interested, I began to go through the website and went to the characters page:

The text is pretty small, so if for some reason if you can’t zoom in or anything like that, here’s what I want to emphasize:

  • Lola and Cole (twins) are part African American, part Irish-American.
  • Maya is pretty much white, but she’s Italian-American and Irish-American.
  • Pia’s mother is white and her father is Chinese-American.
  • Jesse is half Puerto Rican and half African American.
  • Rusty is Hispanic, Native American, and white.

The authors of these books didn’t put a single white child in the group (with the exception of Maya).

But apparently, racial diversity is too hard for people who are 100% white.

8

The Expanse Season 1

“Either you commit to diversity, and it’s just a fact of how you do business, how you live, or you’re not diverse,” Franck says. “You can’t say ‘I know, we’ll be diverse, we’ll gift one black part.’ That sort of tokenism is not diversity. To be truly diverse, you have to start at the top. Our production company, one of the presidents is a black man. The president of our TV division is a woman. Our writer’s room is pretty close to fifty-fifty, men and women. It’s not like there were checkboxes, the attitude was just, ‘Let’s hire an interesting array of voices.’” That attitude extends to the script and the screen. “We’re not trying to champion anyone in particular,” Abraham says. “We’re telling a story, and in the course of the story, there are people who aren’t all white guys. What’s important is what the Zuni woman is doing, not that she’s a Zuni.”
- How SyFy’s The Expanse cast its multiracial future.