divans

                                              Hangisi derindir ki !

                                       Susmak mı yoksa durgunluk mu ?

                                       Ya da nerede sıkışmıştır muamma …

          Öyle mefhum kaçışlar , öyle divane manalar , öyle tenha duygular …

                                                 Bir de hazan  var tabii…

                                                        .fezatenha.


ucu paslı bir makas gibi
kesiverdin tüm sözlerini benden
bakışların yedi kat el,
dokunduğun yer; buz kesiği

oysa bir umuttu
içime iğnelediğin
oysa göktü yüzü/n
niyetin el pençe divan
oysa bir bakışındaydı hayat
yürek deniz; sende durulan
oysa ağaç yeşil, toprak yeşil
ben yeşildim ve sevgili
oysa benim bildiğim gitmeler
böyle değildi…

ucu paslı bir makas gibi
kesiverdin kendini benden
kalışın durgun bir su;
bulanık, kendimi göremediğim
gidişin kayıp bir söz,
yanlış zaman, düş eksiği…

5 Reasons why it's canon that the Inner Circle members are Feyre and Rhys’ kids:

#1 AWKWARD TENSION AKA When Mommy and Daddy Fight

Rhys said smoothly, “I’m not entirely sure Velaris is prepared for Nesta Archeron.” “My sister’s not some feral animal,” I snapped. Rhys recoiled a bit, the others suddenly finding the carpet, the divan, the books incredibly fascinating.

#2 Mommy Feyre not bothering to hide who’s her favorite son

“Honestly,” I said to Lucien, who wordlessly stacked a pile of buttery green beans onto his plate but didn’t touch it, perhaps marveling at the simple fare, so at odds with the overwrought dishes of Spring, “Azriel is the only polite one.” A few cries of outrage from Mor and Cassian, but a ghost of a smile danced on the shadowsinger’s mouth as he dipped his head and hauled a platter of roast beets sprinkled with goat cheese toward himself. “Don’t even try to pretend that it’s not true.”

#3 Cassian struggling with the burden of being the youngest child and therefore mostly ignored…

“Do you know,” Cassian drawled to her, “that the last time I got into a brawl in this house, I was kicked out for a month?” Nesta’s burning gaze slid to him, still outraged—but hinted with incredulity. He just went on, “It was Amren’s fault, of course, but no one believed me. And no one dared banish her.” She blinked slowly.

#4 Daddy Rhysand getting worried over his son an wife

“Shout down the bond when you’re out again,” Rhys said with a mildness that didn’t reach his gaze. Cassian looked back over a shoulder. “Get back to Velaris, you mother hen. We’ll be fine.”

#5 Kids unable to stand their ‘gross’ parents

I smiled, and he leaned in smoothly to brush a kiss to my cheek. Mor muttered a plea for mercy from mates.

Cassian stalked through the front door a heartbeat later and groaned that it was too early to stomach the sight of us kissing. My mate only snarled at him before he took us both by the hand and winnowed us to the Prison.

Quotes taken from ACOWAR by Sarah J. Maas


FIVE THINGS VICTORIAN WOMEN DIDN'T DO: 

(We often assume that the life of the average lass’ in Victorian England was narrow and restrictive, full of stern governesses, stifling garments and fainting spells. Sure, the 19th century’s rules of etiquette, social class and morality all served to limit the range of acceptable behavior, but don’t let the lace doilies and lavender sachets fool you. Not all of the modern clichés we apply to English womanhood in the 1800s hold weight. Below, explore five things Queen Victoria’s female contemporaries didn’t do as often as you might think)

They didn’t die young- People lived to an average age of just 40 in 19th-century England, but that number is deceiving. Certainly, infants and children died of disease, malnutrition and mishaps at much higher rates than they do today. But if a girl managed to survive to adulthood, her chance of living to a ripe old age of 50, 60, 70 or even older was quite good. These odds only increased as the century progressed and improvements in sanitation, nutrition and medical care lengthened Victorian lifespans.

They didn’t marry young- At the end of the 18th century, the average age of first marriage was 28 years old for men and 26 years old for women. During the 19th century, the average age fell for English women, but it didn’t drop any lower than 22. Patterns varied depending on social and economic class, of course, with working-class women tending to marry slightly older than their aristocratic counterparts. But the prevailing modern idea that all English ladies wed before leaving their teenage years is well off the mark.

They didn’t marry their cousins.- Marrying your first cousin was perfectly acceptable in the early 1800s, and the practice certainly offered some benefits: Wealth and property were more likely to remain in the same hands, and it was easier for young women to meet and be courted by bachelors within the family circle. Later in the 19th century, though, marriage between cousins became less common. Increased mobility due to the growth of the railroad and other widespread economic improvements vastly broadened a young lady’s scope of prospective husbands. Meanwhile, the Victorian era saw a rise in awareness of birth defects associated with reproduction among relatives. Cousin marriages remained popular among the upper class, however. Charles Darwin married his first cousin Emma Wedgwood, for instance, and Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were themselves first cousins.

They didn’t wear tight corsets- The popular image of young ladies lacing themselves into corsets drawn up as tight as their maids could make them is a bit misleading. While the Victorian era did feature fashions that emphasized a tiny waist only achievable through the careful application of whalebone and ribbon, most women wore their daily corsets with a healthy dose of moderation—not to the point of swooning on the divan. Also, at the time, corsets weren’t simply a fashion statement: They were actually thought to encourage good, healthful posture and to keep the internal organs in proper alignment. And the extreme practice of removing ribs to slim the waist, rumored to have flourished in the Victorian era, simply didn’t exist

They didn’t wear pink- Today’s approach to gender-specific colors would confuse—and likely amuse—our 19th-century counterparts. White was the preferred color for babies and children of any sex until they reached the age of about 6 or 7, mainly because white clothes and diapers could be bleached. As they grew older, children were dressed in paler versions of the colors adults wore. Red was considered a strong, virile, masculine shade, while blue was dainty, delicate, feminine. So young boys were more frequently seen in pink, while young girls favored pale blue. It wasn’t until the early 20th century—quite possibly as late as the 1940s—that pink began to be universally assigned to girls and blue to boys.

Kim Jongin//Tanked

Originally posted by daenso

Summary: You’ve no idea how to look after fish, and after coming under the unexpected ownership of some, you need some help - and the help is cute as hell.
Scenario: fluff, petstore!AU
Word Count: 5,168

Keep reading

Best parts of acowar

-Jurian rolled his eyes and went back to his bacon. (like he’s done with Ianthe’s shit)

-Lucien seemed inclined to sink into his seat and disappear forever. 

-I shook my head, trying not to imagine Elain subject to that… fire. 

-Rhys and Cassian used the time to unabashedly sun their wings by the open balcony ledge. (I know what you doing peacocks)

-”If you disregard those rules, I’ll lock you in a room with Amren.” (or just Amren being the cranky aunt she is)

-Rhys recoiled a bit, the others suddenly finding the carpet, the divan, the books incredibly fascinating.

-”Don’t try to blend into the shadows(Azriel). You said the same thing.”

-”Get back to Velaris, you mother hen. We’ll be fine.”

-Mor saying “I´m too old for these sort of surprises.”