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  • Chiron: The Hunters win! For the fifty-sixth time in a row.
  • Thalia: Perseus Jackson! *storms toward him, flickering blue sparks* What in the name of the gods were you THINKING?
  • Percy: *balls fists* I got the flag, Thalia! *shakes flag in her face* I saw a chance and I took it!
  • Thalia: *yelling* I WAS AT THEIR BASE! But the flag was gone. If you hadn't butted in, we would've won.
  • Percy: You had too many on you!
  • Thalia: Oh, so it's my fault?
  • Percy: I didn't say that.
  • Thalia: Argh! *pushes him, sending a shock through him that blows him ten feet backwards into the river*
  • Thalia: *pales* Sorry! I didn't mean to—
  • Percy: *ears roaring, angrily erupts a wave from river and blasts Thalia in the face, dousing her head to toe*
  • Percy: Yeah. *growls* I didn't mean to, either.
  • Chiron: Enough!
  • Thalia: *holds out spear* You want some, Seaweed Brain?
  • Percy: Bring it on, Pinecone Face!
  • Percy: *raises riptide*
  • Thalia: *yells, a blast of lightning comes down from the sky, hits her spear like a lightning rod, and slams into Percy's chest*
  • Percy: *is thrown back, clothes burning*
  • Chiron: Thalia! That is enough!
  • Percy: *stands up and wills entire creek to rise, swirling in a massive icy funnel cloud*
  • Chiron: Percy!
  • Percy: *prepares to hurl wave at Thalia, but sees the oracle emerging from the woods and the wave crashes back into the creek*
Day One Hundred And Forty-Two

-Tonight, I was asked to work guest services. Upon reaching the desk, I was handed a large tub containing boxes of “Farewell Dandelion” crayons to hand out to the children. My powers grow stronger still.

-I overheard a woman remark, “As a nurse, it is my opinion that being in a car crash would be both scary and somewhat painful.” As a human who experiences emotions somewhat normally, I concur.

-A mysterious woman with a mysterious purpose entered the store. She told me that she wished to give my manager of letter, content and reason unknown. She insisted upon delivering it herself to avoid the attention of unwanted eyes. I can only hope to one day be a part of such ominous goings-on as have gone on before me tonight.

-Halloween merchandise has arrived, and with it, the canned screams of skeletons and witches echoing down the aisles. I could not be more elated.

-A young boy, perhaps six or seven years of age, excitedly ran through the dollar section, digging around and eventually adorning himself with a pointed black witch’s cap and a tutu as pink and frilly as could be. He was delighted by his outfit, but his delight was nothing compared to his mother’s delight, and his mother’s delight was nothing compared to mine.

-A woman approached the service desk to tell me in a hushed voice that there was a dog outside. She then raised her eyebrows, gave me a knowing look, and walked away. This is precisely the kind of informant I need in my life.

-I processed a return for an elderly woman who was distressed that her new digital thermometer would only display the same numbers with no change. Unsure of how to tell her that she had yet to remove the sticker on the screen, I gladly gave her a refund and sent her on her way.

a friend like mine [2]

Summary: A discussion about a break up leads to….interesting revelations. || Sebastian x Reader || part 2 of 2 || part one is here

Warnings: smut and all that entails, thigh riding, choking, spanking, seb being a dirty lil shit, swearing, and i think that’s it?

Note: I’m going to hell and you’re all coming with me

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washingtonpost.com
People see black men as larger and stronger than white men — even when they’re not, study says
“Our research suggests that these descriptions may reflect stereotypes of black males that do not seem to comport with reality,” an author of the study said in a statement.

This relates to a recent discussion about how fandom often represents Black men in fanwork (See “Why are black characters always portrayed so tall and imposing?”).

But it’s “just fandom.” Doing that doesn’t cause physical harm to actual Black men and boys, right?

Honestly? It kind of does. Not directly, of course. But as the studies above show:

[N]onblack participants believed black men to be more capable of physical harm than white men of the same size. The results also indicated that nonblack observers believed that police would be more justified to use force on these black men, even if they were unarmed, than white male counterparts.

This belief definitely has real world consequences, and it is a belief that has strong parallels in fandom – for example, we see people falsely calling Finn a cold-blooded killer and or a traitor (a term that has had a positive connotation when applied to Leia) for fighting with The Resistance while Kylo Ren has already been pre-emptively forgiven for mass murder and patricide. See also the treatment of Nick Fury and The Walking Dead fandom’s confusion and disappointment when a Black man doesn’t fit their thuggish expectations (which to its credit is pretty often, but I think they were most confused by Tyreese, who had an entire arc involving taking care of baby Judith).

This is why when we see these things in fandom, it’s a problem that is bigger than not liking certain ships and preferring others. These beliefs, when widespread, have real-world consequences, and unfortunately they’re pretty widespread in fandom. We’re supposed to believe that fans who display these beliefs only believe them in a fandom setting when it pertains to fictional characters?

Not likely.

Why I Was Fired By Google, by James Damore

Special to the Wall Street Journal

I was fired by Google this past Monday for a document that I wrote and circulated internally raising questions about cultural taboos and how they cloud our thinking about gender diversity at the company and in the wider tech sector. I suggested that at least some of the male-female disparity in tech could be attributed to biological differences (and, yes, I said that bias against women was a factor too). Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai declared that portions of my statement violated the company’s code of conduct and “cross the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace.”

My 10-page document set out what I considered a reasoned, well-researched, good-faith argument, but as I wrote, the viewpoint I was putting forward is generally suppressed at Google because of the company’s “ideological echo chamber.”My firing neatly confirms that point.

How did Google, the company that hires the smartest people in the world, become so ideologically driven and intolerant of scientific debate and reasoned argument?

We all have moral preferences and beliefs about how the world is and should be. Having these views challenged can be painful, so we tend to avoid people with differing values and to associate with those who share our values. This self-segregation has become much more potent in recent decades. We are more mobile and can sort ourselves into different communities; we wait longer to find and choose just the right mate; and we spend much of our time in a digital world personalized to fit our views.

Google is a particularly intense echo chamber because it is in the middle of Silicon Valley and is so life-encompassing as a place to work. With free food, internal meme boards and weekly companywide meetings, Google becomes a huge part of its employees’ lives. Some even live on campus. For many, including myself, working at Google is a major part of their identity,almost like a cult with its own leaders and saints, all believed to righteously uphold the sacred motto of “Don’t be evil.”

Echo chambers maintain themselves by creating a shared spirit and keeping discussion confined within certain limits. As Noam Chomsky once observed, “The smart way to keep people passive and obedient is to strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion, but allow very lively debate within that spectrum.”

But echo chambers also have to guard against dissent and opposition. Whether it’s in our homes, online or in our workplaces, a consensus is maintained by shaming people into conformity or excommunicating them if they persist in violating taboos. Public shaming serves not only to display the virtue of those doing the shaming but also warns others that the same punishment awaits them if they don’t conform.

In my document, I committed heresy against the Google creed by stating that not all disparities between men and women that we see in the world are the result of discriminatory treatment.

When I first circulated the document about a month ago to our diversity groups and individuals at Google, there was no outcry or charge of misogyny. I engaged in reasoned discussion with some of my peers on these issues, but mostly I was ignored.

Everything changed when the document went viral within the company and the wider tech world. Those most zealously committed to the diversity creed—that all differences in outcome are due to differential treatment and all people are inherently the same—could not let this public offense go unpunished. They sent angry emails to Google’s human-resources department and everyone up my management chain, demanding censorship, retaliation and atonement.

Upper management tried to placate this surge of outrage by shaming me and misrepresenting my document, but they couldn’t really do otherwise: The mob would have set upon anyone who openly agreed with me or even tolerated my views. When the whole episode finally became a giant media controversy, thanks to external leaks, Google had to solve the problem caused by my supposedly sexist, anti-diversity manifesto, and the whole company came under heated and sometimes threatening scrutiny.

It saddens me to leave Google and to see the company silence open and honest discussion. If Google continues to ignore the very real issues raised by its diversity policies and corporate culture, it will be walking blind into the future—unable to meet the needs of its remarkable employees and sure to disappoint its billions of users.

wonder (m)

Originally posted by dear0901

summary: that was the snag, the inconvenience if you will, Jeon Jungkook had next to no experience with girls. It was his best friend that insisted on dragging the poor boy from the safety of his dorm and to the nearest frat party. But now Jungkook no longer attended the parties instead taking refuge on your couch. He’d find comfort there, stretched out upon his back with your legs on either side of his body, your fingers threading lazily through his hair. virgin!kook

word count: 6,028

warning: usual filth, basically sex ed with kook

It’s the way he stares. Eyes almost childlike, shining with an innocence so pure and wondrous. Resisting the urge to indulge in such vulnerability becomes a daily fight because you stare too, except it’s not sheer curiosity that is fuelling you, it’s unadulterated lust. A passionate yearning that has your heartbeat racing and skin setting alight, a fire so intense you ponder on whether or not he’d soothe it or ignite it further.

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Title: At Last
Summary: The day Sakura found out she was pregnant was quite one to remember indeed.
Disclaimer: I don’t own Naruto.
Prompt: That Day
Rating: M
A/N: While I don’t believe they planned to have a baby on the road, this is still a fun and cute scenario to think about. I had lots of fun writing this :)


It wasn’t exactly how she’d ever pictured she would find out: sitting in the middle of a forest, tending to a campfire, watching the love of her life training aggressively against the trunk of an old tree, the warmest smile to her lips—and then, a faint thrumming sensation, odd and completely unfamiliar, sparking low in her belly.

Bemused, Sakura looked down on herself and blinked, touching a palm to her abdomen. An infection, perhaps? she mused, brows furrowing. Shaking her head, the thought was dismissed near-instantly; no, that wasn’t possible—in all her years of experience, she knew with certainty that infections had never been capable of throwing chakra paths off route so much.

Growing evermore perplexed, Sakura simply summoned forth the most basic of her medical techniques, setting about a curious exploration to her body. It was only seconds before she found herself stiffening rigidly, brilliant mind blanking and green eyes snapping wide, rendered entirely speechless by her discovery.

It wasn’t an infection—she’d been right about that. And it wasn’t an instability in her chakra channels either—in fact, there was absolutely nothing wrong with her.

No, she was simply… pregnant.

Her heart stuttered in her chest. A flurry of warmth washed over the whole of her. Pregnant, she thought again, feeling the sweet pulse of this new chakra.

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4

I played with Silas’s strength modifiers a little more after he got a strength surge lmao. My favorite pastime is intentionally getting Sienna injured for Vow of Friendship to activate, whoops.

My hero <3

As a girl with ADHD, Little Witch Academia continues to strike a chord with me with the portrayal of Akko.

Akko not only displays common traits that come with ADHD, she also has to deal with the problems often caused by these traits. She’s hyperactive, she says things before thinking, she struggles to be able to focus/she becomes too focused, she displays time and time again struggles to learn things the “traditional way”. And as Episode 16 kinda shoved in our faces, she is impatient.

While “genki” characters aren’t that uncommon in anime, they are usually comical relief side characters or characters that can somehow lose their ADHD-related flaws when the situation needs it.

I feel LWA has had a more nuanced, more realistic depiction of this “genki” archetype than many other series. Like how they tackle the issue with learning difficulties and assuming everyone learns in the same way. I can imagine that many others with ADHD have been in a situation similar to Akko in episode 7, with Professor Finneran berating her for her lack of progress. But Akko’s struggle to learn isn’t entirely caused by herself. A big part of it is because of the teachers’ unwillingness to understand that Akko may need to be taught in different ways compared to other students. However, Professor Ursula acknowledges this and stands up for Akko (sadly, not everyone with learning difficulties had a “Professor Ursula” to stand up for them in real life).

Something that makes me sad is when people call Akko “insufferable” or something similar. I feel like these people fail to understand Akko’s problems. While, no, she should not get away with hurtful things she does to others, I think it might be easy to forget something: Akko is not an adult.

Akko is still just starting to realize her shortcomings and how to deal with them. She doesn’t fully understand herself yet, and why she struggles with certain things. She may not always realize that her behavoiur can hurt others around her.

This also means that her problems will not just stop, just because she realized how to deal with it. As an example, she will not now suddenly stop becoming impatient after episode 16. She will most likely be able to tell herself to calm down more often now, but not every time.

Character development doesn’t mean a characters flaws disappear entirely, and especially not for a character with ADHD traits.

Honestly Guren would be such a great character if he wasn’t painted as a hero by the narrative because like?? Even though he’s a complete fucking asshole, he’s also very morally grey, and morally grey asshole characters are GREAT for story progression and development because they tend to power/influence the plot far more than most of the protags ever will. So Guren’s dickish, secrative, manipulative nature is actually a very good thing in storytelling terms, but the fact that he’s painted in a more heroic light is just kinda…bluh. It ruins some of his appeal, to be honest, because he’s very clearly not a hero or a savior, so it feels forced. Characters like Guren are perfect as they are while depicted in a neutral light, because you see their good side contrasting with their horrible actions, and it allows the readers to appreciate them for who they are- as flawed, but still interesting, characters. To put Guren’s actions and behavior in a more positive, heroic light ruins the whole thing because the whole appeal to what he’s doing is that it’s flawed and not the right thing. That’s what makes a character like him likeable. To display it as the ‘right’ thing, the heroic thing, ruins it.