disney's giants

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK

We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

Did you guess yet?

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.

Have you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”

Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

the signs as underrated animated films

Aries -  Meet The Robinsons

Taurus - Treasure Planet

Gemini - The Black Cauldron

Cancer -  The Iron Giant

Leo - The Road to El Dorado

Virgo - Atlantis: The Lost Empire

Libra - Brother Bear

Scorpio - The Rescuers Down Under

Sagittarius - Anastasia

Capricorn - Balto

Aquarius - Ferngully

Pisces - Oliver & Company

Why Ducktales is important

At least…If you like Disney Television Animation.  

Which I do.  Oh so much.  

If you’re a fan of Gravity Falls, or Star vs. The Forces of Evil, or Wander Over Yonder, or Kim Possible, or Gargoyles, or any Disney Television show, then gather ‘round because I’m about to teach you some history.  

“Never forget, that it all started with a Mouse,”~~Walt Disney.

Great things come from humble origins.  Never forget that Disney TV…All started with a Duck.  

It was the 1980s.  Disney Television Animation was a new department at Walt Disney Studios.  And Disney was suffering.  These days it’s easy to think of Disney as a mega-giant, but back then, Disney was suffering.  Movies were being produced on shoestring budgets, and animators (such as Don Bluth) were jumping ship to find work at studios that were paying better and producing better content.  The Little Mermaid hadn’t yet hit theaters, sparking the Disney Renaissance.  The fledgeling animation department had produced two shows prior, “The Wuzzles” and “The Adventures of Gummy Bears”.  

Disney was in dire straights from Walt’s passing in 1966 left the studio suffering up until the 80s, when they started to take a few risks.  Risks that paid off.  The studio gambled on the idea that investing more money into quality animation would pay off in the long run if the show went into syndication.  It was something that worked well with live action, but had yet to be done with animation to that degree.  Cheap animation with tons of shortcuts could be syndicated, but something high-quality had never been done before.  

Ducktales was the first show that attempted this, and it paid off handsomely.  Not only was the show a hit with audiences (and a merchandising cash-cow) but it changed the game.  It set the stage for the Disney Afternoon a few years down the road, and paved the path for every show I mentioned at the beginning.  Without Ducktales, there would be no Gargoyles, no Star vs. The Forces of Evil, no Gravity Falls.  

Heck, I take it even one step beyond that…Without the inspiration of proof-of-concept, I’d wager that even OTHER studios cartoon creations wouldn’t exist.  No Animaniacs, No Adventure Time, no Steven Universe (and don’t think I missed the shout-out to Ducktales in “Onion Trade”) 

Ducktales was important because it raised the craft of animation to another level, combining storytelling with good, non-repetitive animation to produce quality TV.  For a time, Ducktales was Disney’s Flagship TV series, waving the banner and representing the company in the realm of television animation. 

And even today, the classic Ducktales series holds up rather nicely.  Sure, some things are a little dated, but at the end of the day, I enjoy watching Ducktales without reservations.  That’s why I own the DVD sets.  

 And it’s why I’m so happy about this reboot.  

This isn’t just a revamp of an old show.  This is Disney returning to its roots, reclaiming a bit of it’s history and polishing it off for the next generation.  I’m a little misty eyed.  I had some initial misgivings when this was announced, but the cast announcement melted those fears away, and now, seeing the trailer that dropped less than 24 hours ago…I don’t think I’ve ever been this excited for a TV series ever.  

Breaking down this trailer, we finally hear David Tennant as Scrooge McDuck.  I’ve actually been aware of Tennant’s presence in the voiceover scene for a few years now (Most notably, he plays bit parts in the How To Train Your Dragon franchise from Dreamworks) But hearing him as Scrooge…I really feel it works.  He’s got a certain quality the echos the late, great Alan Young, and I feel like he couldn’t have been better cast without some of that good old fashioned Disney Necromancy (And as we know, they used up their allotment of Necromancy on Peter Cushing for Rogue One) 

I love that the Nephews are getting unique characterization and personality. I loved Russi Taylor’s performance way back when, but one Nephew was really interchangeable with another.  Dani Pudi, Ben Schwartz, and Chris Moynihan really bring an awesome chemistry to their roles, just from the trailer.

And then there’s Webbigail.  Oh my God, I love how they’ve rebooted Webby.  She was always the annoying load back in the classic series.   Making her a Donald Duck fangirl is freaking GENIUS (and Kate Micucci is perfect for this role too) Bonus points given for Webby’s infamous “Quacky-Patch Doll”  being used for dart practice in the background of her room.  Webby has gone from outright “The Load” territory, to one of the most fun-seeming characters present in the reboot.  

And all of this from one minute and a half trailer.  I can’t wait for this series, even though I know I must.  I know it’s gonna be something special, I can feel it.  Maybe even Disney’s Flagship show, once again.  Stay tuned to my Tumblr, for much, much more.

One thing I know for certain that I’m going to do when the pilot for this airs…A side by side comparison of the Classic Pilot and the new one.  

Peace out, 

Disney Wizard

Zootopia’s ‘The Big Donut’


Yields one 9 inch donut

The things you’ll need

Ingredients
  • ¾ cup warm milk
  • 1 packet active dry yeast
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon almond extract
  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 2 egg yolks
  • Pink royal icing in a decorating bag fitted with a #3 tip
  • Vegan sprinkles
  • Bench flour
Ganache
  • 2 cups chopped chocolate
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon corn syrup
Equipment
  • Large bowl
  • 9 inch cake ring
  • Cookie sheet lined with parchment paper
  • Paper towel
  • Large measuring cup
  • Rubber spatula
  • Whisk
  • Pastry brush
  • Drying rack
  • Large frying pot
  • Candy thermometer
  • Pan spray

Let’s get started!

  1. In a small bowl, combine warm milk, yeast and sugar. Allow to sit for 10 minutes to activate.
  2. Pour the mixture into a large bowl and then mix in egg yolks, butter and almond extract.
  3. Mix in half of flour and then salt. Add the other half of the flour and then knead for a few minutes.
  4. Place dough into a greased bowl and allow it to sit until it has doubled in size.
  5. Place rested dough onto a floured surface and form it into a large circle.
  6. Use a large cake ring to cut the dough into a circle. Use a smaller cookie cutter to hollow out the center and then cover with a towel to proof.
  7. Heat oil to 350ºF and preheat oven to 350ºF.
  8. When the donut has set for about 10 to 15 minutes, place it into the hot oil.
  9. Fry for 1 to 2 minutes and then flip once the edges are golden brown. Fry for another minute or two.
  10. Remove from oil and place onto a paper towel-lined cookie sheet to drain.
  11. Move donut to a clean cookie sheet and bake for 5 minutes.
  12. Remove the donut from the oven and cool completely before decorating.
Ganache
  1. Chop chocolate into small pieces and place into a medium bowl.
  2. Heat cream in a small pot and bring to a scald.
  3. Pour hot cream over chopped chocolate and then add corn syrup.
  4. Allow the mixture to set for 3 minutes and then stir to melt the chocolate until smooth and shiny.
  5. Place donut onto a cookie sheet with a drying rack and pour the ganache over it immediately. Refrigerate before decorating.

Time to decorate!

  1. Carefully place rainbow jimmies onto the donut and then use pink royal icing to pipe “The Big Donut” on top.
  2. TaDa! This larger than life donut will roll right through Zootopia and into your mouth!
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((Epilepsy warning!!)) 

A simple story about a woman with a child who remarries. <3

Programs used: After Effects, Premier Pro, Photoshop

Movies used: The Princess And The Frog, Iron Giant, The Secret of Arrietty

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Showed my Rule 63 work to a friend, but because she is not familiar with some of the movies, it was hard for her to see what changes I had done (expect for adding/removing boobs :P) so I put together this post. Then she was all like “How do you remove facial hair?!” XD

Links to all the GIFs:  ShanPhoebeEsmeraldo 1Esmeraldo 2Miss CharmingDeanaNaveen & Davida

PS: Some of the designs are based on Lettherebedoodles’ work! :D