diseases of the heart

7

Tearful Jimmy Kimmel breaks down revealing newborn son’s heart surgery.

Kimmel used his personal story to blast President Donald Trump for trying to cut $6 billion in funding from the National Institutes of Health, and he applauded Congress for doing the opposite and increasing funding by $2 billion.

He said his experience shows why all Americans need access to health care, especially those ― like his son ― born with preexisting conditions.  

“If your baby is going to die and it doesn’t have to it shouldn’t matter how much money you make,” he said. “I think that’s something that whether you’re a Republican or Democrat or something else, we all agree on that, right?”

Let this sink in - a list of pre-existing conditions lost under #Trumpcare: 

Rape, C-section, AIDS/HIV, acid reflux, acne, ADD, addiction, Alzheimer’s/dementia, anemia, aneurysm, angioplasty, anorexia, anxiety, arrhythmia, arthritis, asthma, atrial fibrillation, autism, bariatric surgery, basal cell carcinoma, bipolar disorder, blood clot, breast cancer, bulimia, bypass surgery, celiac disease, cerebral aneurysm, cerebral embolism, cerebral palsy, cerebral thrombosis, cervical cancer, colon cancer, colon polyps, congestive heart failure, COPD, Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, DMD, depression, diabetes, disabilities, Down syndrome, eating disorder, enlarged prostate, epilepsy, glaucoma, gout, heart disease, heart murmur, heartburn, hemophilia, hepatitis C, herpes, high cholesterol, hypertension, hysterectomy, kidney disease, kidney stones, kidney transplant, leukemia, lung cancer, lupus, lymphoma, mental health issues, migraines, MS, muscular dystrophy, narcolepsy, nasal polyps, obesity, OCD, organ transplant, osteoporosis, pacemaker, panic disorder, paralysis, paraplegia, Parkinson’s disease, pregnancy, restless leg syndrome, schizophrenia, seasonal affective disorder, seizures, sickle cell disease, skin cancer, sleep apnea, sleep disorders, stent, stroke, thyroid issues, tooth disease, tuberculosis, ulcers. 

This cannot pass the Senate, too – contact your senators, people!

[Source]

6

Angry is good. Angry gets shit done. You shed tears for Compe Anansi and here he is, telling you you are staring down the barrel of 300 years of subjugation, racist bullshit, and heart disease. He is telling you there isn’t one goddamned reason you shouldn’t go up there right now and slit the throats of every last one of these Dutch motherfuckers and set fire to this ship.

Researchers say fat shaming could raise a person’s risk for heart disease

  • Comments about weight could add up to big health consequences, according to a new study published in the journal Obesity.
  • Researchers found that overweight women who internalize negative messages about their body size had a higher risk for heart disease and diabetes compared to women who felt more positively about their body size. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Humans are Space Orcs

I discovered (and subsequently gobbled unashamedly on) Humans are Space Orcs, Earth is Space Australia and Humans are Weird trends, and I L O V E D them so here’s my little contribution: medicine, hardy humans, and how-the-heck-is-this-a-medical-procedure??? 

Imagine an alien medical officer going to the Earth to have an update course about human medicine, so he can take care properly of the humans on his crew. He comes back in a shock reporting that apparently humans: 

  • Are born without teeth, then grow a first set, as they mature they shed the first set and grow a permanent one. If the permanent set is not perfect, they literally wield metal contraptions on the teeth of their younglings to force the teeth to grow straight. 
  • Blood is vital. BUT female humans loose blood for five days every month through their genital organs if they don’t get pregnant. This causes an array of problems (from mild pain to ostheoporosis), but females wave this away as a mere inconvenience.    
  • They literally take organs from dead bodies and transplant them into humans with non functioning organs. 
  • They inject pathogens to make themselves resistant to diseases. 
  • Use electrical shocks to reset and restart the heart when it does not function properly. Some humans have a permanent shock machine implanted in their chest. 
  • Consider a perfectly valid emergency procedure to repeatedly hit with a lot of strenght the chest of a person. 

anonymous asked:

i know you meant well when you said 30 isnt ancient, but im nb so my life expectancy is actually 30 :(

Hey anon, I’m so sorry that that’s a fear you’ve had to live with. I know that trans people are at greater risk of violence and suicide, and I’ve heard people say many times that the life expectancy of trans people (or trans women, or trans women of color, depending on who you ask) is anywhere from 23 to 35. Your ask troubled me, so I’ve dug deep looking for solid evidence of any of these, and I don’t believe that these statistics are true.

A trans woman, Helen, looked into the “23 years” claim and traced it back to someone’s notes on two workshops at a 2007 conference, which stated that trans people’s life expectancy is “believed to be around 23” (emphasis mine) but cites no actual source. This claim has been presented as fact in many news articles since then, but as far as I can tell, no one seems to know where this figure came from.

Another claim is often sourced to an Argentine psychologist quoted in this NPR article

Psychologist Graciela Balestra, who works closely with the transgender community, says it’s an especially vulnerable population.

“Transgender people have an average life expectancy of about 30 to 32 years,” Balestra says. “They don’t live any longer; I think that statistic alone says so much.”

But again, the article gives no source for this figure

I found an article claiming that a 2014 report by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) “concludes the average life expectancy of trans people in the Western Hemisphere is between 30-35 years.” However, when I tracked down the report, An Overview of Violence Against LGBTI Persons (pdf), its only reference to this is (emphasis mine): “[T]he IACHR has received information that the life expectancy of trans women in the Americas is between 30 and 35 years of age.” Again, this is no source.

Someone said on my post that these statistics may have come from the NCTE/NGLTF report Injustice at Every Turn (pdf), but I can’t find any reference to any such claim in the report.

Thinking about these claims, they seem unlikely for some basic reasons. Consider that we simply don’t have a long enough span of data on trans people, and that what data we do have is extremely limited because we can’t always know who is trans and who isn’t. Consider also that, although obviously the murder rates for trans people are extremely high, the number of deaths of 20-something trans people would have to be ENORMOUS to offset the existence of older trans people and bring the average down to 30. Especially since, unlike with racial groups for example, the data on trans people would likely include almost no childhood deaths, simply because it would be much more difficult (and in many cases impossible) to identify these children as trans. And since we know that trans women of color are extremely disproportionately affected by violence, statistics that include white people and/or trans men would be especially unlikely to be so low.

And as to your specific situation anon, again given that trans women of color are most at risk, I don’t think we have reason to believe that being non-binary specifically puts a person at anywhere near this level of increased risk of dying young.

I don’t say any of this to question anyone’s experiences or to deny the state of emergency that trans women face with regard to violence. That is very real. But I think it can be harmful, even dangerous to trans people to spread claims like this around, especially without evidence. Expecting to die by 30 would take an extreme emotional toll on anyone, and trans people deserve better.

But don’t take my word for it: FORGE, a national transgender anti-violence organization that works with trans survivors of sexual assault, wrote the following in its 2016 publication “First Do No Harm: 8 Tips for Addressing Violence Against Transgender and Gender Non-Binary People” (pdf) (I have moved two footnotes into the main text and provided links to some endnote sources; italicized emphasis is theirs while bold is mine.): 

Promote Hope for the Future

It certainly is not the same as a murder, but publicizing a low “life expectancy” rate for transwomen of color is another way to steal away their future, a “crime” that has been committed repeatedly by trans, LGBQ, and mainstream press. Think about the people you know or have heard of who have been diagnosed with a fatal illness and given a short time to live: how many of them have enrolled in college, undertaken lengthy training for a new occupation, had a new child, or tried to establish a new non-profit? A few do, certainly, but many more focus on their bucket list, arrange for their good-byes, or simply give up entirely, essentially relinquishing whatever time they have left to depression and regrets. When we tell transwomen of color they cannot expect to live very long, we rob them of hope. We rob them of any motivation to invest in themselves, their relationships, and their communities. We rob them, in short, of their lives even while they are still living. (This statement in no way negates the need to systemically work to improve and increase the life expectancy of trans people through working to end transphobia, racism, poverty, pervasive violence, and health and healthcare inequities, and more.)

One trans woman of color was trying to come to grips with an estimated lifespan figure more than ten years shorter than the one that has been published most often. (We are not repeating any of the (incorrect) estimated lifetime figures that are circulating, to avoid even inadvertent reinforcement.) Faced with the report of yet another attack on another trans woman, she wrote:

These days, I look at the latest reports of stabbed, shot, beaten trans women, search myself for tears, and I cannot find a thing. I want to mourn and rage. I want to honor all of our sisters — the hundreds each year who are ripped, namelessly and without fanfare, from this life — who are taken so young before their time. But the grief and anger — even empathy — do not come. I don’t feel anything but numbness and fatigue, and somewhere far below that, fear.

The terrible irony of the life expectancy “fact” is that it is based on an impossibility. The only ways to determine a given population’s life expectancy are to: examine decades or more of death certificates or census data containing the information being studied, or follow a specific set of individuals for around 100 years and record every single death. There is not and never has been a census of transgender people. Our death certificates do not mark us as transgender. There has been no 100-year-long study of a representative group of trans people. So where are the estimated lifespan figures coming from?

FORGE tracked the most commonly-cited figure back to what was most likely the 2014 Philadelphia Transgender Health Conference, where a workshop presenter gave the figure and explained she had calculated it by averaging the age of death for all of those listed on the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) website. This means the figure is actually the average age of those trans people who were both murdered and came to the attention of someone who added them to the TDOR list. Interestingly, this average is very close to the average age of everyone who is murdered in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Justice statistics. [I’m not seeing an average age given in the cited source but you can see on page 5 of this Bureau of Justice Statistics report (pdf) that the average age of homicide victims in the U.S. was between 30 and 35 from 1980 to 2008.]

But not everyone is murdered.

Despite how many there may appear to be, only a tiny, tiny fraction of transpeople are killed by other people. Most of us, transwomen of color included, live average lifespans and die of the most common U.S. killers — heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, and unintentional injuries (accidents).

Please don’t add to fear and hopelessness by spreading inaccurate and profoundly disempowering data.

Since I can’t respond to everyone directly, I’m @ing some people who’ve brought this up on my post and may be interested: (urls removed after posting for their privacy). I appreciate your thoughtfulness in bringing this to my attention. If you or anyone else has a source on any of these figures that can provide specific methodology, I’d be very grateful to see that.

In closing, here are some resources that provide a more hopeful view of trans aging. They are well known but I hope they will be helpful to someone.

She was damaged, just like me. That’s what made her so magnetic. Pulling me in with eyes that reflected a sadness similar to my own. A familiar pain in which I was drawn to.

But unlike me,
 She had a way of making broken look beautiful. Beautiful in the way that she still believed in fairytales. A hopeless romantic wanting to be swept off her feet. Aimlessly waiting for someone to break down her walls and actually stay this time.

I envied that about her. 
She believed in love and “happily ever afters”. And I worry there is no such thing.

My life is chaotic, just like hers. Maybe that’s what made me so magnetic. Pulling her in with eyes that reflected a fearfulness similar to her own. A familiar uncertainty in which she was drawn to.

But unlike her, 
I have a way of making broken look ugly. Ugly in the way that I am beginning to believe love is just a highly contagious disease. An infection that spreads throughout your body attacking your heart. Slowly decaying over time. And I am infected. My heart is nothing more than an unrecognizable pile of rotting flesh. And I have felt nothing but emptiness for as long as I can remember.

Maybe she envied that about me. 
I was numb. 
And she felt every emotion imaginable.

—  AB

Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds

Consuming cheese, milk and yoghurt – even full-fat versions – does not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to research that challenges the widely held belief that dairy products can damage health.

The findings, from an international team of experts, contradict the view that dairy products can be harmful because of their high saturated fat content. The experts dismiss that fear as “a misconception [and] mistaken belief”.

The results come from a new meta-analysis of 29 previous studies of whether dairy products increase the risk of death from any cause and from either serious heart problems or cardiovascular disease. The study concluded that such foodstuffs did not raise the risk of any of those events and had a “neutral” impact on human health.

“This meta-analysis showed there were no associations between total dairy, high- and low-fat dairy, milk and the health outcomes including all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease,” says the report, published in the European Journal of Epidemiology.

The study concluded that dairy products had a neutral impact on human health. Photograph: Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

Bob Harper had a heart attack.  Now leave fat people alone.

Bob Harper, a former trainer on the Biggest Loser, has been one of the fittest men on television for over a decade.  He had a massive heart attack a couple of weeks ago and was hospitalized for eight days.

Bob Harper – a fitness guru who’s the host of “The Biggest Loser” – suffered a heart attack that left him unconscious for 2 days.

Harper tells us he was working out in a NYC gym 2 weeks ago when he collapsed. A doctor who was also working out administered CPR and used paddles to keep Bob alive.

The 51-year-old was taken to the hospital and says he woke up 2 days later. He was hospitalized for 8 days and is still in NYC – he lives in L.A. – because his doctors have not cleared him to fly.

(cont. TMZ)

Heart disease and heart attacks run in Bob Harper’s family and he says it’s all genetics.  I’m sure he’s absolutely right, but why are we okay agreeing with a fit man who says his heart attack was genetics while we view fat people who say “it’s genetics” with such disdain?

Keep reading


I found this on Facebook:

————————————————–

If you or a loved one have a pre-existing condition, your insurance premiums and deductibles will skyrocket under the Republican (non) healthcare plan, or may be denied coverage. Pre-existing conditions include, but are not limited to:

AIDS/HIV,
acid reflux,
acne,
ADD,
addiction,
Alzheimer’s/dementia,
anemia,
aneurysm,
angioplasty,
anorexia,
anxiety,
arrhythmia,
arthritis,
asthma,
atrial fibrillation,
autism,
bariatric surgery,
basal cell carcinoma,
bipolar disorder,
blood clot,
breast cancer,
bulimia,
bypass surgery,
celiac disease,
cerebral aneurysm,
cerebral embolism,
cerebral palsy,
cerebral thrombosis,
cervical cancer,
colon cancer,
colon polyps,
congestive heart failure,
COPD,
Crohn’s disease,
cystic fibrosis,
DMD,
depression,
diabetes,
disabilities,
Down syndrome,
eating disorder,
enlarged prostate,
epilepsy,
glaucoma,
gout,
heart disease,
heart murmur,
heartburn,
hemophilia,
hepatitis C,
herpes,
high cholesterol,
hypertension,
hysterectomy,
kidney disease,
kidney stones,
kidney transplant,
leukemia,
lung cancer,
lupus,
lymphoma,
mental health issues,
migraines,
MS,
muscular dystrophy,
narcolepsy,
nasal polyps,
obesity,
OCD,
organ transplant,
osteoporosis,
pacemaker,
panic disorder,
paralysis,
paraplegia,
Parkinson’s disease,
pregnancy,
restless leg syndrome,
schizophrenia,
seasonal affective disorder,
seizures,
sickle cell disease,
skin cancer,
sleep apnea,
sleep disorders,
stent,
stroke,
thyroid issues,
tooth disease,
tuberculosis, and
ulcers

Republicans in Congress have exempted themselves and their staff members from losing the ACA protections that cover pre-existing conditions.

A few years ago, Dr. Gregory Thomas’ research made him think that no matter how much you exercise, how much kale you eat and how many cigarettes you avoid, heart disease is inevitable. Eventually, everyone’s arteries will harden up with some calcium plaque as they age, Thomas thought, increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

Now a group of farmers in Bolivia have blown that theory out of the water, Thomas says.

Who Has The Healthiest Hearts In The World?

Image by Matthieu Paley/National Geographic

Fruit and vegetables fall into five different colour categories: red, purple/blue, orange, green and white/brown. Each colour carries its own set of unique disease-fighting chemicals called phytochemicals. It is these phytochemicals that give fruits and vegetables their vibrant colour and of course some of their healthy properties.

What’s in a colour?

RED
Red fruits and vegetables are coloured by a natural plant pigment called lycopene. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that can help reduce the risk of cancer and keep our heart healthy.

PURPLE /BLUE
The plant pigment anthocyanin is what gives blue/purple fruits and vegetables their distinctive colour. Anthocyanin also has antioxidant properties that protect cells from damage and can help reduce the risk of cancer, stroke and heart disease.

ORANGE/YELLOW
Carotenoids give this group their vibrant colour. A well-known carotenoid called Betacarotene is found in sweet potatoes, pumpkins and carrots. It is converted to vitamin A, which helps maintain healthy mucous membranes and healthy eyes. Another carotenoid called lutein is stored in the eye and has been found to prevent cataracts and age-related macular degeneration, which can lead to blindness.

GREEN
Green vegetables contain a range of phytochemicals including carotenoids, indoles and saponins, all of which have anti-cancer properties. Leafy greens such as spinach and broccoli are also excellent sources of folate.

BROWN/WHITE
White fruits and vegetables contain a range of health-promoting phytochemicals such as allicin (found in garlic) which is known for its antiviral and antibacterial properties. Some members of the white group, such as bananas and potatoes, are also a good source of potassium.