discrimination

4

Social studies teachers been lying??? Would it be so hard to believe? Corruption and racism have gone hand in hand for so long. Besides, ask Native Americans. The atrocities done to so many nations across America were rewritten. Once you investigate you see the systemic racism at all levels. Ask Japanese Americans about the concentration camps from WW2 and how their lives, property, businesses were stolen and destroyed. All these things are just blips in books.

Little Cop-Rick Things Our World Needs

His strict adherence to protocol, in holding himself to the highest standards of law enforcement professionalism, even when no one is looking. In an environment where Ricks can get away with literally anything, he holds himself accountable even in gun practice, wearing his protective glasses.

His empathy and sympathy, that renders him hesitant and unwilling to act in violence against even those who are threatening him, if it is unneccesary or in anyway in just. Consider his pause when he is given a handicapped target to shoot, even a virtual one from an enemy species.

His immediacy in apologizing for any unintentional or reflex discrimination which merely crosses his minds (“oh, sorry, I was expecting… ”), even when his actions have not manifested in clear prejudice. His self-policing and correction unlike the inherent or learned behaviour of the discriminatory culture of the citadel.

He remembers and respects his sensitivity training, which although he claims to have been a weakness after his stabbing, is still shown in his unwillingness to simply kill his Morty partner at the club. He dislikes the unnecessary incessant violence and amoral apathy of the dichotomy, and disapproves of it being Morty-incited or Rick-incited.


He wears his safety belt. Safe Cop Rick is a Good Cop Rick.

He knows a Rick’s personality, the capacity for irresponsibility and selfish pursuits, yet holds himself as an individual Rick to a higher standard. When they storm the house, he doesn’t blame the Mortys, he blames the Rick (“is that what I think it is?”) Because he’s the grandfather, he’s the supposedly more intelligent, and he sure as hell should know better.

He admits responsibility, and in a world which shirks the backlash of violence, no matter how culpable and justified it is, he struggles with what Evil Morty comes to describe as “order”.

Because “order” doesn’t neccesitate justice and peace, it simply acts the systemic organization of a society through authority and culture. Rather, tyrannical chaos, discrimination and cruel dictatorship is strictly enforced and becomes this new illusion of “order”. Cop-Rick can’t accept this easily. Hopefully, he fights back.

As a society, we need to fight back.

Today Would Have Been Emmett Till’s 76th Birthday if a White Woman Didn’t Lie on Him

Emmett Till would have turned 76 today, July 25, had a white woman not lied on him. Roy Bryant’s wife, now known as Carolyn Bryant Donham after having divorced and married a few times (something not afforded to Emmett, by the way), broke her silence and admitted that she made up the most damning part of her testimony.

The 82-year-old confessed about 10 years ago to author Timothy Tyson, a Duke University senior research scholar, who was working on the book The Blood of Emmett Till.

That part’s not true,” Donham reportedly told Tyson about her claim that Emmett made verbal and physical advances toward her.

Conveniently, Donham claimed that she didn’t remember exactly what happened in the store.

But Emmett’s family and much of the world were well aware of what happened to Emmett after she accused him of inappropriate advances. The terrified 14-year-old was kidnapped from the home of relatives by Donham’s then-husband and Milam. Emmett was beaten, mutilated and shot to death before the half brothers sank his body in a local river by tying a 75-pound gin fan around his neck.

Meanwhile, more than 60 years later, Emmett’s family is still seeking justice on behalf of their loved one, with his surviving relatives asking for the case to be reinvestigated after Donham admitted to lying on the teen.

One thing that’s always bothered me was that stories and events like this were never really shown or discussed in public schools. When I was going to school it was always: MLK, the Civil Rights movement, sit-ins, the boycotts etc. Schools never really showed the truly horrific stories that came with in this time of American history: the Emmet Till Murder, the Medgar Evers murder, The 16th St. Baptist Church bombing, Nat Turner’s uprising and many more. There are soo many stories like this to be told, yet are never discussed.

buzzfeed.com
Man kicked out from apartment agreement because he's gay -- and it's legal
"When I used the word boyfriend, that’s when everything turned south."
By Lauren Strapagiel

This week in British Columbia, Canada, a gay man named Caleb Gardiner was booted from the room he was renting when his landlord found out he was gay – and based on the nondiscrimination law there, it’s completely legal. 

Gardiner had been renting a room in a shared space where the renter indicated that there would be an additional charge if someone stayed over. Gardiner let the woman know that his boyfriend would be staying over so he could pay the fee, and she told him to find another place. 

If you guys are gay, I cannot allow this to happen in my house. Pls don’t bring your boyfriend to sleepover in my house,” the renter, identified as Jenny, told Gardiner over text message. “If you insist to do so, I would refund you all your money & please leave tomorrow, & find somewhere to stay.” 

The renter said she is a Christian and that their relationship is “totally against God’s will. I don’t want this thing in my house at all.” […]

Although it is illegal to discriminate against tenants based on their sexual orientation when renting out a whole place, that doesn’t apply in shared spaces, such as when someone is just renting a bedroom.

According to Section 10 of BC’s Human Rights Code, if “sleeping, bathroom or cooking facilities” are shared, renters can discriminate however they wish.

Maybe don’t post a public listing if you’re going to turn people away for being gay. That’s all there is to it. 

“Anti-Muslim activists often attempt to foment hatred against Muslims by claiming that Islam is inherently anti-queer. 

While homophobia certainly still exists in American Muslim communities, as a whole, American Muslims are slowly becoming more accepting of homosexuality. 

And notably, they’re doing it at a faster rate than white evangelical Protestants.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/american-muslims-are-now-more-accepting-of-homosexuality-than-white-evangelicals_us_597f3d8de4b02a4ebb76ea3d?ncid=engmodushpmg00000003

I hear a lot about the “gay agenda” in my work as an advocate for L.G.B.T. people. Sometimes I hear that we are agitating for “special rights.”

Which — let’s be honest — is true. I do want special rights.


I want the special right, for instance, to not be beaten or murdered by ignorant bigots. At least 15 transgender women have been killed so far this year for the crime of being themselves.I want the special right not to be fired from my job. In 28 states, it’s perfectly legal to terminate an employee because you don’t like the gender of the person that he or she is in love with. In others, gay employees are protected, but trans ones aren’t. In some states, it is even illegal for local governments to pass or enforce anti-discrimination laws.


I want the special right to not be homeless. In this country, an estimated 1.6 million young people experience homelessness each year; 40 percent of them are L.G.B.T. A third of the homeless queer young people ran away from home because they faced physical, emotional or sexual abuse.


I want the special right to be able to turn on the television, or go to the movies, and see, maybe just once, a person like myself on the screen. I mean someone other than a murder victim in a crime show, or a straight, cisgender actor getting a trophy honoring his bravery for pretending — ineptly — to be someone like me, or trans people being interviewed on talk shows as if gender transition is something as distant as the moon and they are transsexual Buzz Aldrins.


I want the special right to open up the newspaper and not have to read one more clever “think piece” in which the humanity of people like me is held up for public debate.

—  My Gay Agenda | Jennifer Finney Boylan for the New York Times 

As an abled-body person, you do not get to decide what a disabled person can and can’t do.
You do not get build a world that is only suited for your needs, and then tell us it’s not your fault we can’t do something.
You do not get to blame inaccessibility on our disability.
You do not get to choose if you want to accommodate us.
You do not get to limit us just because we are disabled and “that’s the way life is.”

huffingtonpost.com
Supreme Court overturns state ruling, allows same-sex spouses to be listed on birth certificates as parents
The justices ruled in favor of lesbian couples by throwing out a December ruling by the Arkansas Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court has overturned a state court ruling that allowed Arkansas to refuse to list two same-sex spouses as the parents on a baby’s birth certificate.

The Arkansas Supreme Court had upheld the discriminatory law in December. 

The justices ruled in favor of lesbian couples by throwing out a December ruling by the Arkansas Supreme Court that upheld state officials’ refusal to name the wives of the birth mothers as parents on birth certificates.

The Arkansas court said state officials do not have to list both same-sex spouses as named parents on birth certificates, even though state law allows a birth mother’s opposite-sex husband to be listed when the baby is not biologically related to him. Both couples received the birth certificates they wanted when they won in trial court.

Conservative Justices Neil Gorsuch, Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas dissented, saying the lower court decision should not have been reversed.

Good good good. (Also, welcome to SCOTUS, Neil Gorsuch, thanks for already giving LGBTQ people a big ol’ slap in the face.)

Female Chinese Adoptee in the US

Hi, I’m a female Chinese adoptee who spent more time with a foster mother than in the orphanage. I was adopted before I was half a year old by a white American single mother, and later raised by two white American parents once she married. I have a younger sister who is also adopted from China, but we aren’t blood related at all (yes people do ask me if we are). I grew up in a largely white portion of the south and went to religious schools with largely white populations (My mom did not adopt me from some misguided Christian white supremacist stance of saving me). I’m currently getting a degree in theater and film, so well thought out representation and minority stories are very important to me. Every adoption story is different, and as far as I can find, you only have the one POC profile on Chinese adoption and I wanted to give my point of view for variation.

I want to preface this by saying that my adoption has had a big impact on my life, but it is not my identity, and the impact it’s had isn’t something that I was consciously thinking about as it happened. It’s mainly as I’ve gotten older and looked back that I’ve realized how it has impacted certain aspects of my life. Growing up, my adoption isn’t something that was always on my mind, and it’s only through trying to better understand myself and who I identify as that I’ve come to analyze it more. Also sorry this is super long, I just wanted to be thorough.

Beauty Standards

Again, not something I consciously thought about when I was younger. Contrary to the popular stereotypes and fixations about Asian eyes, the shape of my eyes wasn’t something I thought about. What I was self-conscious about when I was a kid was how “flat” my face was, especially my nose. I felt like I didn’t have any definition, and because I didn’t grow up seeing many other Asian people or POC for that matter, I didn’t understand that different races had different facial structures. I just internally accepted that the caucasian facial structure was how people were supposed to look. I’ve since accepted the way I look, and while I don’t think I’m the hottest chick out there, I like the way I look.

Culture

When I was young, my mother enrolled me in Mandarin Classes and Chinese Culture classes/camps designed for Chinese adoptees to help me connect to my native culture and to surround me with other people like me. At one point I was even enrolled in a Chinese Fan Dance class if I remember correctly. I’m sure I had fun with some of them, just as I’m sure my attention span was short when I was a kid and that I got bored quickly. I didn’t have a problem with them at the time, but looking back I do remember feeling mildly annoyed with going to the events specifically for adopted kids because if felt like people just assumed we’d be friends because off of us shared the adoptee experience. I get that same feeling of annoyance when people to this day tell me “Oh, so and so is adopted from China too! You’d like her,” because I personally resent the idea that people assume my adoption is my identity and that alone is enough for me to connect with someone.

Identify Issues

I have always identified as a Chinese-American. My parents were always very honest with me about my adoption for as long as I can remember, so I was always somewhat aware that I was different. That being said, growing up surrounded by white people meant that the people I identified with where white, and there was a time in middle school where a teacher mentioned something about me being different in regards to my race (we were talking about casting for the school play). For a good 5 minutes I was confused about what she meant until I remembered that I was Chinese and not white like everyone else. That’s a moment that’s stuck with me throughout my life and I’ve always been a little ashamed of forgetting myself.

Recently I was asked if I identify as an immigrant, and I didn’t know how to answer. Technically I am one. At one point I had a green card and my mother had to fill out paperwork to make me a US citizen, so I don’t feel like I wasn’t an immigrant, but I also don’t identify with the typical image of immigrants. My story of finding my place in America isn’t the typical story of POC immigrants so I don’t necessarily feel solidarity with them. 

Within Asian Americans’, there’s been a stereotype about them being too Asian, but not Asian enough which is something I’ve also struggled with on both sides. In high school when I mispronounced pho, I was accused of being a “bad Asian” by a white friend, but when I was talking diversity politics with a teacher, my point of view was dismissed because she knew I was adopted so I was “basically white anyway.” While I do try to defer to the point of view of Asian immigrants and descendants of immigrants when it comes to certain topics and experiences, I also think it’s important for people to understand that when I interact with the majority of people, I am treated as an Asian woman. I live life as an Asian woman, not a white woman. Alternatively, because I grew up in such a white area, I admit that I grew up with a lot of internalized racism and have found myself judging mixed race Asians for the same thing from time to time though I am actively trying to unlearn that habit.

Honestly, as I get older and try to understand who I am more, the more confused I get over my identity. It’s still something I’m working to understand.

Language

Outside of the Mandarin classes I went to briefly as a kid, I also took 3 semesters of Mandarin in college to fulfill my language requirement. I did actively choose to take Mandarin because I thought it was important for me to learn, not because of my culture, but because as an aspiring Chinese American actress, many breakdowns for roles require a knowledge of fluent Mandarin. I am not fluent. I fulfilled my requirement and haven’t pursued it any further as of yet. I might try again in the future.

Daily Struggles

Since turning roughly 18, whenever I go places with my parents, we’re typically asked if we want to split the check, but if my younger sister is with us, no one asks. I don’t know if it qualifies as a struggle, but it’s something I’ve noticed that biological parents and children don’t go through as much. I’ve also come to explain that I’m adopted when I’m talking about my childhood or my past. I do it partially to give context to whatever story I’m about to tell or for whatever I’m explaining. Ex: I’ve had to explain my background during a workshop when I wrote a paper on representation in media for Asian Americans because the people reading the paper didn’t know I was Asian American simply from the context of the personal experiences I presented in the paper and were guessing my race off of my white sounding name. I’ve also had to explain my background when another Asian American commented repeatedly that I “sound so white.” I’m also very open about the fact that I’m adopted if people ask because it’s not something I’m ashamed of, and I want to normalize the idea of adoption.

When I was only a couple years old there was a girl who made fun of me for being adopted. It’s one of my mom’s favorite stories, because rather than letting the girl get to me, I said something snarky in return, but I’m assuming that’s why I try to normalize the idea of adoption, because being adopted doesn’t make me any less of a person than someone who is still with their biological parents.

I also witnessed a lot of the Asian eye jokes, but curiously enough they were never directed at me. I guess that says something about the kind of environment I lived in, because when I said something to a boy drawing an “Asian smiley face” he looked stunned and was surprised that I was Asian. I guess this instance doesn’t have as much to do with adoption but is more of a comment on the stereotype about how Asians are supposed to look distorting the fact that we actually look like regular human beings and not caricatures.

Dating and Relationships and Home/Family Life/Friendships

I’m putting these two in the same category because my abandonment issues have had a similar impact on them. As a kid, I always hated leaving when we were visiting my out of state grandmother or whenever my mom would go on a work trip. I would cry and fuss, and even as an adult, I hate saying goodbye for a long period of time. Intellectually, I know I’ll see these people again, but emotionally I worry about what if? I also get really scared and start tearing up if my parents are late coming to pick me up from the airport when I come to visit. I worry about being left alone. And I want to emphasize that this isn’t a conscious, “Oh, I’m adopted, I’m worried I’m going to be abandoned again” type thing. So much of these feelings are internalized and subconscious. It’s just that fear of never seeing someone you care about again, and even though I’m a logical person who knows that they’re just late, I can’t override that fear.

I have never had a romantic relationship and I have a few close friends, but I’m not the life of the party. I’ve always been careful about forming connections with people and have even actively resisted it when I was younger and was going to camps or doing something where I’d only see these people for a small amount of time. I had the mentality of “It’s not worth it because I’ll never see them again,” and that’s another thing I’m trying to overcome, because I still don’t like making connections if I know they’re not going to last. For similar reasons, I’m also very bad at vocalizing my affections and feelings towards people. I’ve never liked letting people close, and there was a time when I was a teen where I even distanced myself from my family, and that’s a bridge I’m still trying to repair to this day.

My family has always been understanding of the fact that I’m dealing with a lot when it comes to understanding my adoption and my identity, but there are also some things that they don’t understand and it can be hard to talk to them about things like my cultural identity and growing up around tons of micro-aggressions that they’ve never had to deal with. 

Misconceptions

The idea of who my real parents are. The idea of one set of parents being more valid than the other just seems fucked up to me, especially when it’s been posed to me as “So if they tell you to do something, do you ever just say, ‘No, you’re not my real parents, you can’t tell me what to do.’” My adopted parents are still my parents. I also think of my biological parents as my parents. I have never hated or resented my biological parents for giving me up nor have I ever used my adoptee status as an excuse to act out towards my adopted parents. While I do know about the One Child Policy, I don’t know the specific circumstances surrounding why I was given up for adoption. I don’t see the point in being angry about it without knowing the whole story, and I’ve come to terms with the fact that I may never know the whole story.

I also don’t feel particularly grateful towards my adopted parents or like I owe them anything for adopting me. Don’t get me wrong, I still love them, but I’m not actively trying to repay them for adopting me. I don’t owe them my life, they’re just my family.

Self-Esteem

I had a lot of self-esteem issues growing up, and they still persist today. They aren’t something I linked back to my abandonment issues until I sat down and talked to a therapist. I’ve always been a perfectionist to the point where I was never happy with anything I did, unless it was perfect. I literally never felt good enough. Part of the reason I distanced myself from my family is because I didn’t want to be a bother. Intellectually I knew I wasn’t going to be abandoned again, but I still felt like I had to be as good as I could possibly be to make sure. This is another one of those things that was never consciously thought about, it’s just how things were. I didn’t feel like I or whatever issues I was having was worth the trouble of bothering people, especially my parents, so I just didn’t, and had a habit of keeping a lot of things bottled up inside without telling anyone*. It’s another thing I’m also currently working to better my perception of myself.

*Just because I was trying to be a good kid and didn’t vocalize affection much does not act as an excuse for writing a submissive, emotionally stunted stereotype of a Chinese Adoptee. I am also snarky and sarcastic and opinionated and outgoing with my friends.

Things I’d like to see less of

Stop using adoptees in the abortion argument in general, especially if you don’t understand the adoption process or the issues adoptees face. Stop asking me to choose who my real parents are. It also bothers me the way people romanticize adoption, even if it’s people in various fandoms goofing around. People who adopt are not saints. Fandoms who make light of adoption and squee about wanting to adopt a character or wanting one character to adopt another makes light of a whole situation. Adoption is a great thing. It’s great for kids without families to get a family, but it’s also a painful thing for the kid, because a kid needing to be adopted means that they’ve also lost a family at a young age. Please be sensitive of that. Don’t romanticize adoption. People trying to empathize with those internalized feelings of abandonment and mistrust when they don’t have the same or similar experiences. Other people are allowed to feel those things, but please understand that the degree of what we feel is immense. From a personal perspective, when people try to do that, it feels like they’re making light of what I feel.

Things I’d like to see more of

Just normalizing the idea of adoption and understanding the good and the bad. Adoption stories in media that don’t hinge on the angsty, rebellious adoptee being angry at their adoptive parents. Stories that give adoptees identities outside of their being adopted. Understand that all adoptees are not the same. We all have different experiences based on race, religion, the region we’ve been adopted into, the kind of parents we have. There are so many variables that make up who we are.

“ENOUGH OF THE GAY STUFF”

Sent to my website email this morning - Subject: Enough Message: Enough of the gay stuff on Bright Sessions. Please we are begging you. Sent on: June 2, 2017.

So here we are, two days into PRIDE month. How’s everybody doing?

I’m going to start off by leaning into the mic and saying with full-throat clarity: “Fuck you…you fucking fuck”.

I am a gay man…and before that, I was a gay kid…a scared and angry kid who had so much internal homophobia brewing inside of him that he thought he might explode because nothing in the world was convincing him, or trying to convince him for that matter, that it was normal and okay to be who he really was. And I can tell you, when I was that scared kid, shows like The Bright Session were almost non-existent; and what a shame.

I would have cried from happiness if The Bright Sessions existed when I was a boy. Shows like The Fosters, Glee, Eye Witness, Riverdale, Shadowhunters…shows where I could see myself on the screen in a way all of my heterosexual friends could without question since birth. 

Today I turn on the radio…and 99.999% of the music is, narratively, written/produced with a straight audience in mind…and in some cases/genres it’s used to target and ridicule me and my sexuality.

I live in a world where gay men are being thrown off of rooftops and “exorcized” in Chechnya because they are seen as aberrations; less than…underserving of love and existence. I live in a world where in my own country, a venomous discriminatory fear-based movement validated by the election of their figurehead sent a resounding message that my rights are actually up for debate.

In a world where there is so little positive reflected back at me…so little out there saying that my truth and the stories that express my life and experiences on this earth are valid…in a world where I feel like every day and every breath is a stand to qualify my existence…In that world, I get a message that tells me “enough of the gay stuff”. 

So…to the person who sent this message, I feel sorry for you; I genuinely do…I truly, genuinely and absolutely do. How terrible your life must be, and how delicate your self-image must be to reach out and say something like that. At first look, the message is mean and evil…but then the shaky-ground of masculine fragility reveals itself, as it always does, and I pity you. 

This is Pride Month…It’s meant to celebrate the LGBT+ community and our allies by opening up to share the beauty and diversity of our lives with everyone. I am proud of who I am…and it took a damn long time to get here.

I can’t really speak for Lauren, our creator/show-runner, or the rest of the cast, but…we have a gay character, a bi character, a lesbian character and a “no labels at this time” character confirmed as canon in The Bright Sessions…and I’m here to tell you we will never “enough with the gay stuff”. We are here to celebrate the people and stories that matter to us…Caleb, Adam, Mark and Rose are my friends; these are the people I have in my life and I think you’d be lucky to know. So yeah, no…not “enough of the gay stuff”. 

*throws glitter in the air and walks off*

- Briggon