nytimes.com
October 2014: Pentagon Signals Security Risks of Climate Change
The Pentagon on Monday released a report asserting that climate change poses an immediate threat to national security, with increased risks from terrorism, infectious disease, global poverty and food shortages.
By Coral Davenport

The Pentagon on Monday released a report asserting decisively that climate change poses an immediate threat to national security, with increased risks from terrorism, infectious disease, global poverty and food shortages. It also predicted rising demand for military disaster responses as extreme weather creates more global humanitarian crises.

The report lays out a road map to show how the military will adapt to rising sea levels, more violent storms and widespread droughts. The Defense Department will begin by integrating plans for climate change risks across all of its operations, from war games and strategic military planning situations to a rethinking of the movement of supplies.

Unstoppable California Gas Leak Being Called Worst Catastrophe Since BP Spill

This methane disaster is worse than can be sufficiently described in words, because while it’s estimated well over 100,000 pounds of methane spew into the atmosphere every hour, the leak can’t be halted, at least until spring. Even then, that stoppage depends entirely on the efficacy of a proposed fix — which remains a dubiously open question.

jimmy kimmel: so how was working with each other again after so many years apart?
gillian: we send exactly Two (2) emails Once (0nce) a year
david: [w heart eyes] well me and gillian, us we gillian and I,

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On 8 January 2005, USS San Francisco collided with an uncharted undersea mountain while operating at maximum speed, leaving one dead, Machinist’s Mate Second Class Joseph Allen Ashley, and 99 injured.

The US Navy found Commander Kevin Mooney, the ship’s captain, responsible for the accident, relieving him of his command but without charging him with any crime nor court-martialing him, another six crew members were also reprimanded.

The accident completely destroyed her forward bow section, including the sonar, which had to be replaced by another section from the recently decommissioned USS Honolulu, costing 79 million dollars; however, her pressure hull nor nuclear reactor were compromised. 

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While hundreds of guests celebrated the wedding of Keren and Asaf Dror on the 24th of May 2001, the third floor of the venue suddenly collapsed, killing 23 people and injuring 380, in an event that has come to be known as the Versailles Wedding Hall Disaster.  After investigation, it was revealed that a structural design flaw had caused the collapse, as the third floor of the building was originally intended to be the roof, and as such was unable to support the weight of hundreds of people.  The terrifying moment the floor gives way was caught on camera by a wedding guest, and is available to watch online.  The three owners of the hall, and an engineer involved with the construction of the site, were charged with death by negligence and manslaughter, respectively.

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29 December 2011 Russian submarine K-84 Ekaterinburg (Delta IV) fire and aftermath.

The fire began while the vessel was in dry dock, after sparks from a welding job ignited wooden scaffolding around the ship, which then spread to the very flammable rubber coating covering the hull. The damage was deemed reparable, and the submarine returned to service in 2014.