disassembled

9

“I love my atypical job!”

Terry Walschaerts works in the team that manages our recent vertebrate collections. More specifically, she works with the mammals and birds (the so-called ‘dry specimens’, as opposed to the specimens conserved ‘in alcohol’ like reptiles, amphibians and fish).

She adores the atypical and diverse side of her job. Administrative tasks like coding and registering new collections (”When I see an animal, the first thing that pops into my head is its scientific name!”), welcoming visiting scientists, preparing loan vouchers for exhibitions, etc.

There are also the less ordinary tasks: helping disassembling a whale skeleton, doing make-up on the specimens in our Museum (”We make them pretty again with a hair blower!”), handling rare, unknown or extremely soft species (”Arctic hares are incredibly soft, they are my favourites”), receiving specimens from the Zoo of Antwerp (”Discovering these new collections, unpacking them, is like an early Christmas!”).

Scary specimens on Halloween

“In our collections, we have really ancient specimens. They are often posed in a very aggressive way, sometimes even frightening – that used to be in fashion. Sometimes, they are even too damaged to be exhibited or studied. But once a year, just for a few hours, they are brought out of their conservatory: they welcome children who come to spend the Halloween night at the Museum, to set the mood! For the occasion, we also emerge human models. Children love them!”

I have this strange feeling that I’m not myself anymore. It’s hard to put into words, but I guess it’s like I was fast asleep, and someone came, disassembled me, and hurriedly put me back together again. That sort of feeling.
—  Haruki Murakami
Oh, it’s not your job? It is now.

This is a long story.

Intro and Backstory

My dad was a mechanic for 20+ years, and for as long as I can remember, I drove him nuts because I would go around the house with a screw driver he left out and take everything apart because I wanted to see how it work. As I grew older I developed an affinity towards computers and electronics, which led me to be “that kid” in High School who changed his grades, crashed the school districts servers, and used the NETSEND command with great success. I would spend my weekends either with my grandparents and uncle working on science projects or dragging my dad outside to help me fix my car (which consisted of him telling me that he would help once I got it taken apart). Those “figure it out” lessons were the probably the greatest gift he could’ve given me growing up.

I joined the US Army in 2004 and went into communications or “commo” for short (25U) where I managed to go from PVT (E1) when I joined to SGT (E5) by the time I returned from my deployment in 2006. After returning home, I was subsequently transferred from a Light Infantry Unit (walking everywhere) to a Mechanized Infantry Unit (Riding in an armored vehicle everywhere) and placed in charge of the Battalion Commo Shop as the current person running the commo shop was scheduled to retire in a few months and I was the only other NCO. This is where things got interesting and my Commo vs. Mechanics ProRevenge story starts…

Commo vs. Mechanics

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The Disassembly Line and the Body-Bag of Holding

Context- We’re a mostly evil party composed of a Human Necromancer (me), a Deep-Dwarf Barbarian, an Elven Ranger and his wolf companion, and a Halfling Rouge/Bard. It was an adventure’s league Dnd game, so while the players and characters knew each other, the poor DM was ill prepared for our… weirdness.

Dm: Alright, with the bandits dispatched, the forest regains its previous calm. What would you like to do.

Halfling: ASSUME POSITIONS!!!

-The party then proceeds to line up single file after piling the bodies on top of one another.

Dm: What are you doing exactly?

Halfling (OOC): Oh, It’s very simple. The ranger checks a body for valuables, I check any of those for magic. 

Dwarf (OOC): The body gets passed to me and the wolf, who proceed to eat most of the meat off them. (The dwarf has gone a little crazy, and has a taste for raw meat, especially elf)

Necromancer (OOC): Lastly, I take what’s left, turn what I can into skeletons, and throw the leftovers into my Bag of Holding for later use. 

Dm, completely dumbfounded: W…Well…Fair enough. 

-A few in-game-minutes later, the battlefield’s cleaned of corpses, save our new minions. A bit of spell casting and Rangerly-track hiding left the forest trail pristine, leaving anyone following us completely oblivious to the grotesque fate of the bandits. 

Accuse me of not working my full 40, we'll see about that.

(long story: tl;dr at the end)

My job received some dramatic changes with the labor law changes from late last year. While it’s not technically law right now, my company is enforcing our policy to test the waters and see how it works for us. Basically this means, I can only work 40 hours a week. No overtime approval is available. Any days we work over 8 hours we have to use compensated time (comp time) to even it out. To help maintain office coverage we have meetings to plan our comp time.

To clarify, we can only use our comp time only on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays since we need a full staff on Monday and Fridays to assist our sales team. Also we can’t use it to come in late or leave early. So basically we’re left with taking long lunches (2.5-3 hours sometimes) right in the middle of the work day. But randomly, they’ll give us full days off when we work 6:30-7 hours on a weekend (which is nice, but this also is creating productivity problems). The staff who are a part of this have grown very frustrated because these long lunches are interfering with our work, meetings, appointments, and for the commuting staff they have to sit in their office for a long period of time and do nothing. Finally after a few months of this ineffective system, we told our CEO that we need to discuss some changes we think would make this better for everyone. He meets with our Exec Team and they agreed to attend our comp meeting to discuss things.

So, this Monday we all walk into the meeting with some level of hope. At the very least we’ll be heard and be able to say that we’d like to be able to come in a little late or leave a little early when things are slower. Our CEO explains his view on comp time and then a co-worker of mine explains how it isn’t working for us and it’s causing problems. Now our CEO is normally a chill guy, but he used an angry and defensive tone I’ve never seen before and went on a 15 minute rant about comp time. His rant included:

Keep reading

2

Built from salvage near Providence, Rhode Island

My friend and I built this cabin by hand with two hammers and two hand saws. We completely disassembled a 100+ year old garage owned by this old man, Donald. We took every piece apart and stacked them up while Donald pulled out all the nails and put them in a bucket. 

We put all the wood in a box truck, drove it into the woods and dropped it off. Over the next few months, we would carry the wood on our shoulders a few hundred feet into a section of the woods we liked that was hidden and inaccessible by car. We spent a couple months getting it together, but it’s been an ongoing project for a couple years.

We have to straighten out each nail Donald put in that bucket to reuse them. We’re $30 into this cabin so far. We just recently installed a woodstove we found. No power tools were used at all. 

Contributed by Adam Benoit

3

Ruger 10/22 Takedown Silent-SR ISB

New integrally suppressed barrel assembly from Ruger for their popular 10/22 Takedown rifles. The barrel’s suppressor follows the design of their Silent-SR series. Ruger claims to be able to reduce standard velocity .22 LR to an average of 113.2 dB. The last photo shows the disassemble suppressor which is simply to clean and put back together. (GRH)

2

hopeless fountain kingdom 6.2.17
Today I sent fans worldwide in 9 different territories on a hunt. They were given coordinates, where a tiny toy gun was hidden. The toy gun disassembled to become a USB stick containing a small piece of the album cover. All over the world fans worked together to collect the pieces and reveal the album art. I am so excited for what the future holds and there are many more adventures coming your way. #FindMeInTheKingdom

Kylo Ren is a mess, but he’s a competent mess. Powerful, witty, and intuitive. The majority of Ren’s failures stem from a lack of faith in himself.

  • He senses something in Finn, but doesn’t act on it.
  • He clearly senses that Rey is a powerful force-user, but instead of trusting himself to handle the situation he runs to Snoke.
  • He knows - the Ben part of him, at least - that killing Han Solo isn’t right (I’m being torn apart), but follows through anyways because Snoke commanded it.
  • And as a result, he finds himself weakened. Subjugating grief into anger, already wounded, he impulsively chases after Rey and Finn.
  • When Luke’s lightsaber doesn’t come to him, you can see Ren lose faith in himself. It’s plain on his face. Later, when Rey starts to meet him stroke-for-stroke, he grows even more uncertain. Rey - who remains focused and furious - gains the upper hand, and kicks his ass.

(let me know if I’m missing any examples or counterexamples)

And ever Ren’s mirror, Hux’s failures are a result of him trusting himself (or at least, the institution and ideals that he identifies with) too much - placing too much faith in the stormtrooper program, in his weapon’s shields.

Cheap Pleather

Summary: You and Bucky have been given what was meant to be a simple task - but is it?

Word Count: 1,042

Warnings: Language

A/N: It’s short, it’s (hopefully) sweet, and I hope you enjoy it. The idea for this came as I was settling in to my new apartment, and dealing with the same frustrating task. 

Originally posted by gimmebuckysloveorelse

“Just put it in.”

“Like this?”

“Ow, oh -”

“Babe?”

“No, no, I’m okay. Just go a little slower.”

“What in the hell -”

Keep reading

They disassembled the self checkout at our target for some reason so my cashier had to ring up my very depressing purchase of 3 bags of microwave rice and tiny bottles of seasonings

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Word Bank

We finally have our Work Bank.

The word bank is not an index, or a glossary. Instead, it’s a selection of words that we consider worth learning, or at least putting somewhere in one’s mind. 

As you’re aware, every single word in the episode is defined. So this is something more for the hardcore studiers. 

You’ll find the word in Japanese script, the Romaji in parentheses (), the definition, and then the Part of the runthrough where this word can be found in brackets []. It may not be the first time it appears, but it will be there.


Functional Units

は (wa) — topical particle

って (tte) — casual topical particle

が (ga) — nominative particle

に (ni) — dative particle 

へ (he) — locative particle

の (no) — genitive particle

で (de) — instrumental particle

を (wo) — accusative particle

と (to) — quotative particle

って (tte) — casual quotative particle

と (to) — comitative particle

も (mo) — secondary particle, meaning “too” or “even”

さ (sa) — emphatic secondary particle

の/ん (no/n) — substantivizing suffix

し (shi) — conjunctival suffix, marking an item in a non-exhaustive list 

でしょう (deshou) — dubitative ending particle (verbal expression)

だろ (daro) — dubitative ending particle (verbal expression)

ね (ne) — dubitative ending particle

な (na) — casual dubitative ending particle

よ (yo) — emphatic ending particle

ぞ (zo) — emphatic, sometimes imperative, ending particle

か (ka) — interrogative ending particle 

から (kara) — post-position, meaning “from”

まで (made) — post-position, meaning “to” or “up to”

で (de) — post-position, meaning “at” 

より (yori) — post-position, meaning “than”

けど (kedo) — conjunction, meaning “though”

が (ga) — conjunction, meaning “though” 


Nouns & Pronouns

あっち (acchi) — over there [5]

あなた (anata) — second person singular pronoun [26]

あんた (anta) — casual second person singular pronoun [23]

あの (ano) — that over there [4]

跡 (ato) — sign, indication [14]

挨拶 (aisatsu) — greeting, salute [8]

あいつ (aitsu) — casual third person plural pronoun, “that person over there” [3]

あれ (are) — that (thing) [11]

明日 (ashita) — tomorrow [20]

あったり前 (attarimae) — obvious [6]

ば (ba) — old woman, grandmother [16]

バカ者 (baka-mono) — idiot [1]

別 (betsu) — separate [17]

僕 (boku) — first person masculine singular pronoun, “I” [4]

部下 (buka) — subordinate [11]

分解 (bunkai) — disassembly, deconstruction [34]

美人 (bijin) — beautiful person [2]

血 (ち) — blood [5]

地下 (chika) — basement [8]

小さい (chiisai) — small [6]

ちっぽけ (chippoke) — tiny [4]

地図 (chizu) — map [4]

中尉 (chuui) — lieutenant (military rank) [8]

中心 (chuushin) — center, middle [8]

大総統 (daisoutou) — great leader, supreme leader, führer [8]

だけ (dake) — only [12]

駄目 (dame) — no good [13]

誰か (dareka) — somebody [36]

誰も (daremo) — nobody [36]

電話 (denwa) — telephone [12]

どっち (docchi) — which one? [34]

度胸 (dokyou) — courage, nerve [29]

永遠 (eien) — eternity [36]

獲物 (emono) — prize, catch [10]

餌 (esa) — bait [29]

不死身 (fujimi) — immortality [17]

服 (fuku) — uniform [24]

不可解 (fukakai) — mystery [9]

付随 (fuzui) — paralysis [11]

我慢 (gaman) — patience [2]

現実 (genjitsu) — reality [6]

犠牲者 (giseisha) — victim [29]

誤報 (gohou) — misinformation [33]

軍 (gun) — army [9]

軍曹 (gunsou) — sergeant [14]

牛乳 (gyuunyuu) — (cow’s) milk [6]

派手 (hade) — showy, flashy [26]

鋼 (hagane) — steel [9]

排除 (haijo) — elimination [35]

花 (hana) — flower [36]

発砲 (happou) — firing (of a gun) [32]

変 (hen) — weird [9]

部屋 (heya) — room [2]

日替わり (higawari) — daily special [4]

光 (hikari) — light, a beam of light [4]

暇 (hima) — free time [23]

額 (hitai) — forehead, brow [16]

人 (hito) — person [1]

人目 (hitome) — public notice [26]

星 (hoshi) — star [36]

方 (hou) — way, manner [2]

一 (ichi) — one [10]

異常 (ijou) — abnormality [33]

いくつも (ikutsumo) — a great many [4]

一飯 (ippan) — meal [19]

入り口 (iriguchi) — entrance [14]

入れ墨 (irezumi) — tattoo [16]

石 (ishi) — stone, rock [12]

一緒 (issho) — together [2]

いや (iya) — disagreeable [7]

邪魔 (jama) — hindrance, intrusion [35]

自分らしさ (jibunrashisa) — individuality [36]

自重 (jichou) — prudence [9]

実家 (jikka) — childhood home [12]

人体 (jintai) — human body [34]

情報 (jouhou) — information [5]

壁 (kabe) — wall [36]

下半身 (kahanshin) — lower body [11]

快晴 (kaisei) — good weather [28]

監察医 (kanatsui) — medical examiner [11]

看護師 (kangoshi) — nurse [2]

可能性 (kanousei) — possibility [5]

官邸 (kantei) — residence [8]

体 (karada) — body [5]

彼 (kare) — third person masculine singular pronoun, “he.” [3]

仮説 (kasetsu) — theory [5]

憲兵 (kenpei) — military police [13]

危機 (kiki) — danger [17]

貴様 (ki-sama) — second person singular pronoun, “you” [2]

季節 (kisetsu) — season [36]

こっち (kocchi) — this one, over here [6]

こちら (kochira) — this one, over here [31]

国家 (kokka) — the state [13]

心 (kokoro) — heart, mind [4]

この (kono) — this [8]

これ (kore) — this (thing) [16]

個室 (koshitsu) — private room [2]

気 (ki) — energy [10]

貴重 (kichou) — precious [14]

君 (kimi) — second person masculine singular pronoun, “you” [36]

ここ (koko) — here [14]

こと (koto) — thing [1]

言葉 (kotoba) — word; language [1]

交差 (kousa) — crossing [4]

国 (kuni) — country, nation [24]

食らう (kurau) — to eat [11]

傷 (kizu) — scar, wound [16]

行動 (koudou) — action [27]

距離 (kyori) — distance [8]

巨大 (kyodai) — huge [11]

許可 (kyoka) — permission [12]

今日 (kyou) — today [52]

興味 (kyoumi) — interest [18]

協力 (kyouryoku) — cooperation [18]

急 (kyuu) — urgent, sudden [36]

休暇 (kyuuka) — leave, vacation [13]

街 (machi) — town, neighborhood [26]

街中 (machijuu) — the whole town [26]

持ちきり (machikiri) — hot topic [26]

窓 (mado) — window [18]

前 (mae) — in front, ahead [17]

まま (mama) — still, as it is [4]

真っ白 (masshiro) — pure white [4]

巡り (meguri) — circumference [36]

命運 (meiun) — fate [19]

道 (michi) — road [36]

見舞い (mimai) — visiting the sick [8]

もの (mono) — thing [11]

申し訳 (moushiwake) — excuse [1]

基 (moto) — base, origin [8]

ムチャ (mucha) — absurd [29]

むだ (muda) — useless, futile [35]

無理 (muri) — impossible [14]

無用 (muyou) — useless [25]

涙 (namida) — (crying) tear [36]

何 (nani) — what? [11]

ネズミ (nezumi) — mouse; rat [4]

鼠色 (nezumi iro) — gray-colored [4]

兄 (nii/ani) — older brother [5]

肉体 (nikutai) — one’s body, one’s flesh [5]

臭い (nioi) — scent [33]

じ (ji) — uncle, old man [16]

お前 (omae) — casual second person pronoun, “you” [11]

女 (onna) — woman [12]

おおよそ (ooyoso) — rough [8]

おおきな (ookina) — large [16]

おれ (ore) — casual first person masculine singular pronoun [6]

恩 (on) — debt, gratitude [19]

終わり (owari) — ending [13]

落書き (rakugaki) — scribbling, graffiti

礼 (rei) — reward, gesture of appreciation [25]

錬金術師 (renkinjitsushi) — alchemist [12]

錬成 (rensei) — transmutation [5]

練習 (renshuu) — those people [8]

力量 (rikiryou) — ability, capacity [14]

利用 (riyou) — use [3]

両足 (ryou-ashi) — both legs [10]

了解 (ryoukai) — understanding, comprehension [24]

両目 (ryou-me) — both eyes [4]

先 (saki) — before, previous [23]

作戦 (sakusan) — strategy [18]

さすが (sasuga) — as one would expect [31]

生活 (seikatsu) — lifestyle [12]

精神 (seishin) — soul, mind [5]

世界 (sekai) — world [4]

背中 (senaka) — back (anatomy) [24]

戦友 (sen’yuu) — war buddy [11]

せず (sezu) — without [9]

至急 (shikyuu) — urgent [31]

死者 (shisha) — deceased [16]

身長 (shinchou) — height [6]

心配 (shinpai) — worry, concern [3]

少佐 (shousa) — major, lieutenant commander (military rank) [13]

すぐ (sugu) — immediately [15]

睡眠 (suimin) — sleep [7]

真相 (shinsou) — truth [17]

司令部 (shireibu) — headquarters [13]

下 (shita) — below [4]

失礼 (shitsurei) — discourtesy [21]

少年 (shounen) — youth, young boy [32]

そこ (soko) — there [2]

その (sono) — that [8]

そんな (sonna) — such, like that [5]

曹長 (souchou) — sergeant major (military rank) [8]

空 (sora) — sky [4]

大佐 (taisa) — colonel (military rank) [1]

旅 (tabi) — travel [4]

退役 (taieki) — retiring from military service [12]

大切 (taisetsu) — important [26]

対峙 (taiji) — confronting [17]

大将 (taishou) — chief (military rank) [12]

魂 (tamashii) — soul [2]

多数 (tasuu) — great in number [16]

手詰まり (tedzumari) — stalemate, dead end [21]

敵 (teki) — enemy [1]

扉 (tobira) — gate [3]

途中 (tochuu) — en route, along, midway [36]

時 (toki) — time [5]

特徴 (tokuchou) — feature, characteristic [16]

所 (tokoro) — place [13]

年 (toshi) — year [6]

年寄り (toshiyori) — old person [11]

つぼ (tsubo) — vase [26]

次 (つぎ) — next [31]

使い (tsukai) — talk [8]

通達 (tsuutatsu) — notice [16]

腕 (ude) — arm [20]

上 (ue) — top, above [24]

噂 (uwasa) — rumor [26]

分け前 (wakemae) — portion [30]

我々 (wareware) – first person plural pronoun, “we” [2]

私 (watashi) — first person singular pronoun, “I” [1]

約束 (yakusoku) — promise [19]

野郎 (yarou) — brat; bastard; disliked person [2]

やつ (yatsu) — casual third person singular pronoun, “that guy” [2]

よう (you) — form, likeness [25]

予想外 (yougai) — unexpected [10]

行方不明 (yukuefumei) — missing, unaccounted for [27]

夢 (yume) — dream [4]

雑貨屋 (zakkaya) — general store [12]

全市 (zenshi) — the entire city [16]


Verbs

あごで使う (ago de tsukau) — to push someone around [29]

当たる (ataru) — to hit

会う (au) — to meet [14]

開ける (akeru) — to open [14] 

諦める (akirameru) — to give up [1]

現れる (arawareru) — to show up [16]

ある (aru) — copula [1]

歩く (aruku) — to walk [36]

ちゃう (chau) — to complete; for an occurrence to be inconvenient [1]

だ (da) — copula [2]

出来る (dekiru) — to be able to do [3]

出る (deru) — to leave, to exit [1]

どこか (dokoka) — anywhere, somewhere [10]

降り出す (furidasu) — to begin to rain [4]

払う (harau) — to buy [25]

働く (hataraku) — to work [10]

始まる (hajimaru) — to begin, to start [30]

引き出す (hikidasu) — to draw out [9]

拾う (hirou) — to pick up, to gather [36]

生きる (ikiru) — to live [1]

行く (iku) — to go [4]

いらっしゃる (irassharu) — to come, to go (honorific) [21]

いる (iru) — copula [1]

言う (iu) — to say [1]

退く (hiku) — to stand aside [30]

自分 (jibun) — oneself [22]

帰す (kaesu) — to send (back) [2]

かける (kakeru) — “to hang” or “to apply” [9]

描く (kaku) — to draw [36]

感じる (kanjiru) — to feel [33]

変わる (kawaru) — to be different; to change [35]

数える (kazoeru) — to count [8]

汚す (kegasu) — to dirty, to get hurt [7]

聞き出す (kikidasu) — to get information out of someone [15]

決まる (kimaru) — to decide [22]

傷つく (kizutsuku) — to be wounded [8]

困る (komaru) — to get in trouble [14]

こんな (konna) — like this [23]

殺す (korosu) — to kill [2]

ください (kudasai) — “please;” from kudasaru (honorific verb) to give to one [2]

くれる (kureru) — to give to one [13]

来る (kuru) — to come [2]

加える (kuwaeru) — to add [16]

任せる (makaseru) — to entrust [1]

まねる (maneru) — to mimic [29]

回る (mawaru) — to turn [13]

迷う (mayou) — to get lost [36]

交ぜる (mazeru) — to combine [5]

見る (miru) — to see [4]

見捨てる (misuteru) — to abandon [24]

認める (mitomeru) — to recognize, to admit [6]

持ち逃げる (mochinigeru) — to run off with something [19]

戻る (modoru) — to return [20]

もらう (morau) — to receive, to receive a benefit from another’s action [10]

持つ (motsu) — to carry [5]

向き合う (mukiau) — to come face-to-face with” [6]

泣く (naku) — to cry [17]

失くす (nakusu) — to some something

直す (naosu) — to correct [26]

なる (naru) — to become [32]

寝る (neru) — to sleep [7]

逃げる (nigeru) — to escape [35]

滲む (nijimu) — to run away [4]

伸びる (nobiru) — to grow [6]

残す (nokosu) — to leave behind [14]

飲む (nomu) — to drink [7]

おびき出す (obikidasu) — to lure out [17]

思う (omou) — to think [17]

おく (oku) — to place [22]

襲う (osou) — to attack [17]

咲かす (sakasu) — to hold up to the light [4]

誘う (sasou) — to invite [4]

刺す (sasu) — to stab [12]

背負う (seou) — to be burdened with [6]

しまう (shimau) — to finish, for an action to be an inconvenience to one [28]

信じる (shinjiru) — to believe [1]

死ぬ (shinu) — to die [20]

する (suru) — to do [1]

捨てる (suteru) — to discard [22]

食べる (taberu) — to eat [35]

企む (takurami) — to scheme [11]

頼む (tanomu) — to beg [23]

助ける (tasukeru) — to rescue [18]

立つ (tatsu) — to stand up [8]

照らす (terasu) — to illuminate [36]

届く (todoku) — to reach, to get through [4]

途切れる (togireru) — to be interrupted [12]

捕まえる (tsukamaeru) — to arrest, to capture [30]

付ける (tsukeru) — to affix, to attach [15]

作る (tsukuru) — to make [36]

繋がる (tsunagaru) — to be connected [6]

釣る (tsuru) — to fish [10]

強がる (tsuyogaru) — to act tough [36]

飛ぶ (tobu) — to fly, to leap [33]

取る (toru) — to take, to take in [5]

疑う (utagau) — to doubt [18]

分かる (wakaru) — to scheme [11]

忘れる (wasureru) — to forget [27]

焼く (yaku) — to burn [3]

役立つ (yakudatsu) — to serve a purpose, to be useful [27]

やる (yaru) — to do [12]

よこす (yokosu) — to hand over [30]

揺れる (yureru) — to sway, to shake [36]


Adjectival Verbs

危ない (abunai) — dangerous [20]

ありがたい (arigatai) — thankful [11]

早い (hayai) — early [20]

ほしい (hoshii) — wanted, desired [27]

いい (ii) — good [7]

痛い (itai) — painful [2]

怖い (kowai) — scary [27]

長い (nagai) — long [36]

多い (ooi) — many, various (countable) [13]

遅い (osoi) — late; too late [3]

寂しい (sabishii) — lonely [36]

しんどい (shindoi) — tired [30]

楽しい (tanoshii) — fun, enjoyable [31]

突拍子もない (toppyoushi mo nai) — crazy, far-fetched [6]

強い (tsuyoi) — strong [4]

うるさい (urusai) — noisy, loud; “be quiet” [2]

安い (yasui) — easy, relaxed, cheap [26]

よしい (yoshii) — good (polite) [33]


Adverbs

あんまり (anmari) — too much, too - [11]

ちゃんと (chanto) — properly, exactly [8]

ちょっと (chotto) — a little, “wait a minute” [5]

大至急 (daishikyuu) — as soon as possible [33]

だいたい (daitai) — generally, mainly [2]

どう (dou) — how? [5]

どこまでも (dokomademo) — anywhere, persistently [4]

再び (futatabi) — once again [16]

はっきり (hakkiri) — clearly, definitively [8]

引き続き (hiki-tsudzuki) — for a long time [1]

他 (hoka) — other [16]

以後 (igo) — henceforth, from here on out [9]

今 (ima) — now [3]

まさか (masaka) — “no way!” “you don’t say” [3]

まっすぐ (massugu) — straight ahead [4]

まだ (mada) — still, yet, hithero [4]

もっと (motto) — more [1]

なんで (nande) — why? [2]

なんて (nante) — a thing like (despective) [22]

なぜ (naze) — why? [2]

のこのこ (nokonoko) — nonchalantly [1]

おそらく (osoraku) — likely [27]

せっかく (sekkaku) — finally [12]

しょっちゅう (shocchuu) — always, constantly [7]

そう (sou) — such, in that way [7]

少し (sukoshi) — a little bit [20]

すんなり (sunnari) — with no objection [13]

多分 (tabun) — perhaps [17]

やっぱり (yappari) — as expected [26]


Interjections

あ (a) — “oh” [2]

はあ (haa) — “huh?” [5]

はい (hai) — “yes” [1]

ほう (hou) — “Oh”

くそ (kuso) — “Shit…” [21]

ったく (ttaku) — “damn..” [12]

うわっ (uwah) — “agh” [31]

やあ (yaa) — “hi” [10]

よう (you) — “hi” [10]

And It’s Like No Time Has Passed

without trying very hard at all you can see bob’s current Look™ in this

(ao3) (general warning for 4x13 spoilers just in case)


“Predictable.”

Bellamy looks up like he’s been caught, pushing up his glasses and smiling guiltily. For all the times Clarke drew him over the past six years– on every spare piece of scrap paper she could find, every blank stretch of wall in the lab– she never imagined him like this: hair shaggy and long, the sharpness of his jaw shadowed with stubble, wearing glasses.

Smiling, easy and relaxed.

It feels wrong that most of her memories of him are shadowed by tension, broad shoulders pulled tight, jaw muscle jumping, gaze hard and canny. A soldier in wartime. Her heart aches that she gets to see him like this, gets to see him at all.

“What are you trying to say, Princess?”

His voice makes her breath catch.

Six years of talking to an empty radio channel, hoping against hope that she’d hear his voice coming through, but never really expecting it to. And now he’s here, and he’s answering back, and it’s just– it’s a lot to take in.

“Leave it to Bellamy Blake to find his way straight to the armory,” she says with feigned exasperation, and he ducks his head, smiling. “Most of your crew is enjoying the feast we prepared for you guys, but not you.”

“You think I’m gonna waste my first chance in six years to really get away from Murphy?”

Clarke laughs and comes to stand next to him, watching as he meticulously cleans each piece of the gun before him, fingers deft and sure. It’s pretty hot, if Clarke is honest with herself.

And she’s learned to be very honest with herself the past few years.

They’re barely touching, his arm skimming hers every time he moves, but it sets her heart racing fast as ever.

Get it together, Griffin. You’re not seventeen anymore.

Keep reading

The Goiânia accident

The Goiânia accident was a radioactive contamination accident that occurred on September 13, 1987, at Goiânia, in the Brazilian state of Goiás, after an old radiotherapy source was stolen from an abandoned hospital site in the city. It was subsequently handled by many people, resulting in four deaths. About 112,000 people were examined for radioactive contamination and 249 were found to have significant levels of radioactive material in or on their bodies.

In the cleanup operation, topsoil had to be removed from several sites, and several houses were demolished. All the objects from within those houses were removed and examined. Time magazine has identified the accident as one of the world’s “worst nuclear disasters” and the International Atomic Energy Agency called it “one of the world’s worst radiological incidents”.

What follows in a incredible series of events motivated purely out of ignorance, childish wonder and greed, and the dire consequences this brought to the people involved and the city as a whole:

The accident began when two thieves, Roberto dos Santos Alves and Wagner Mota Pereira, broke into the abandoned and partially demolished Instituto Goiano de Radioterapia (IGR), where they came across a caesium-137-based teletherapy unit.

 They partially disassembled the unit, and placed the source assembly – which they thought might have some scrap value – in a wheelbarrow, taking it to Alves’s home, and once there, they began dismantling the equipment. That same evening, they both began to vomit. Nevertheless, they continued in their efforts. The following day, Pereira began to experience diarrhea and dizziness and his left hand began to swell. He soon developed a burn on this hand in the same size and shape as the aperture – he eventually had partial amputation of several fingers. 

On September 15, Pereira visited a local clinic where his symptoms were diagnosed as the result of something he had eaten, and he was told to return home and rest. Alves, however, continued with his efforts to dismantle the equipment. In the course of this effort, he eventually freed the caesium capsule from its protective rotating head. His prolonged exposure to the radioactive material led to his right forearm becoming ulcerated, requiring amputation.

On September 16, Alves succeeded in puncturing the capsule’s aperture window with a screwdriver, allowing him to see a deep blue light coming from the tiny opening he had created. He inserted the screwdriver and successfully scooped out some of the glowing substance. Thinking it was perhaps a type of gunpowder, he tried to light it, but the powder would not ignite.

On September 18, Alves sold the items to a nearby scrapyard. That night, Devair Alves Ferreira, the owner of the scrapyard, noticed the blue glow from the punctured capsule. Thinking the capsule’s contents were valuable or even supernatural, he immediately brought it into his house. Over the next three days, he invited friends and family to view the strange glowing substance.

On September 21 at the scrapyard, one of Ferreira’s friends succeeded in freeing several rice-sized grains of the glowing material from the capsule using a screwdriver; Alves Ferreira began to share some of them with various friends and family members. That same day, his wife, 37-year-old Gabriela Maria Ferreira, began to fall ill. On September 25, 1987, Devair Alves Ferreira sold the scrap metal to a second scrapyard.

The day before the sale to the second scrapyard, on September 24, Ivo, Devair’s brother, successfully scraped some additional dust out of the source and took it to his house a short distance away. There he spread some of it on the cement floor. His six-year-old daughter, Leide das Neves Ferreira, later ate a sandwich while sitting on this floor. She was also fascinated by the blue glow of the powder, applying it to her body and showing it off to her mother. Dust from the powder fell on the sandwich she was consuming; she eventually absorbed 1.0 GBq, total dose 6.0 Gy, more than a fatal dose even with treatment.

Gabriela Maria Ferreira had been the first to notice that many people around her had become severely ill at the same time.

On September 28, 1987 — 15 days after the item was found — she reclaimed the materials from the rival scrapyard and transported them to a hospital. Because the remains of the source were kept in a plastic bag, the level of contamination at the hospital was low.

In the morning of September 29, 1987 a visiting medical physicist used a scintillation counter to confirm the presence of radioactivity and persuaded the authorities to take immediate action. The city, state, and national governments were all aware of the incident by the end of the day.

News of the radiation incident was broadcast on local, national, and international media. Within days, nearly 130,000 people swarmed local hospitals concerned that they might have been exposed. Of those, 250 were indeed found to be contaminated— some with radioactive residue still on their skin— through the use of Geiger counters. Eventually, 20 people showed signs of radiation sickness and required treatment.

Ages in years are given, with dosages listed in grays (Gy).

Fatalities:

  • Leide das Neves Ferreira, age 6 (6.0 Gy), was the daughter of Ivo Ferreira. When an international team arrived to treat her, she was discovered confined to an isolated room in the hospital because the hospital staff were afraid to go near her. She gradually experienced swelling in the upper body, hair loss, kidney and lung damage, and internal bleeding. She died on October 23, 1987, of “septicemia and generalized infection” at the Marcilio Dias Navy Hospital, in Rio de Janeiro. She was buried in a common cemetery in Goiânia, in a special fiberglass coffin lined with lead to prevent the spread of radiation. Despite these measures, news of her impending burial caused a riot of more than 2,000 people in the cemetery on the day of her burial, all fearing that her corpse would poison the surrounding land. Rioters tried to prevent her burial by using stones and bricks to block the cemetery roadway. She was buried despite this interference.
  • Gabriela Maria Ferreira, aged 37 (5.7 Gy), wife of junkyard owner Devair Ferreira, became sick about three days after coming into contact with the substance. Her condition worsened, and she developed internal bleeding, especially in the limbs, eyes, and digestive tract, and suffered from hair loss. She died October 23, 1987, about a month after exposure.
  • Israel Baptista dos Santos, aged 22 (4.5 Gy), was an employee of Devair Ferreira who worked on the radioactive source primarily to extract the lead. He developed serious respiratory and lymphatic complications, was eventually admitted to hospital, and died six days later on October 27, 1987.
  • Admilson Alves de Souza, aged 18 (5.3 Gy), was also an employee of Devair Ferreira who worked on the radioactive source. He developed lung damage, internal bleeding, and heart damage, and died October 18, 1987.


Devair Ferreira himself survived despite receiving 7 Gy of radiation. He died in 1994 of cirrhosis aggravated by depression and binge drinking.

Source