Can I just say that I see so little about autistic disabled people so????

shoutout to autistic people who need mobility aids

to those who stim with their aids

to those who get labeled as faking for wanting to do more than sit around all day

to those who fall under both autpunk and cripplepunk (aka our triple threat friends)

to those who society entirely rejects

to those who struggle to tell others they don’t need or want the help

we’re all strong and amazing and I wish we got more positivity

Because it’s important to be honest when your knowledge is incomplete, and because I want to expand that knowledge, I have a serious question:
What medical conditions exempt a person from being able to go vegan?
I’ve known vegans with food allergies, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, IBS, nutrient absorbency issues, chronic pain, mobility issues, hormonal issues, eating disorders, depression, anxiety, autism, addiction, and many other issues. I have/am currently dealing with some of these myself.
Specifically, which condition(s) require the consumption of animal products?

Perks of being disabled

With being disabled, you are able to understand and empathise with a lot of people who struggle. Me, having anxiety, depression, and chronic fatigue, I am able to understand some things that people go through a lot better. I can also help and support people, empathise, show them love. And I think that is wonderful, using disability as a way to to help others around me and comfort them. The world could use a little love.

anonymous asked:

Hi! I'm currently writing a story in which the protagonist is blind. The story is set in a fantasy world, and I've found that it's difficult to find advice on how to write a blind character in a fantasy setting. Most articles I stumble across are about blind characters in the modern world. Do you have any tips on writing a blind fantasy character? I want to make sure my story doesn't sound super ridiculous (a huge part of the plot is that she can kick ass).

This is actually a topic that sits quite close-to-home with me. I’m not blind, however, I’m partially sighted. My left eye has no sight, and have reduced vision in my right. I don’t know things from a blind person’s perspective, but I’ll do my best from what I know and what I would do. 

Descriptions

If you are writing this story from a first-person perspective then you will need to think a novel way to include descriptions of your world. It’d actually be quite interesting, relying solely on sounds and the imagined landscapes of your protagonist. If they have not always been blind, then you could include things from that perspective too. 

Also, you must do a lot of research into how blind people cope doing simple every day tasks. A lot of tasks will be the same in a fantasy world as they are in a modern setting: getting dressed, washing pots, etc. But also blind people who, say, take archery classes or anything like that. A lot of cool RNIB groups take blind people out for activity days where they might do a lot of things your protagonist might end up doing.

Research How Blind People were Treated in Different Cultures

A lot of fantasy draws upon different cultures laws, traditions, etc, and plays with them to create a completely different world. 

Add a lot of historical cultures, too. Because in the modern day many cultures are bound by the UN and Geneva Human Rights conventions, but some practises, right or wrong or simply tradition, might have gone on beforehand. 

Here’s some to start you off;

The Human Condition is Still The Human Condition

I’ve often heard it said about fantasy and sci-fi that, all though the worlds are different and strange, the characters must be human. (Well, unless they are aliens—that’s another topic.) But they must feel things, think things, work things out. And, all though your protagonist lives in a world that’s not like our own, they will still no doubt have a lot of the same feelings. Especially if they are young. I don’t know how old you are going for here, but here’s some things that really effected me as a partially blind person and some people I knew from various projects who were actually blind. 

Being independent: A lot of us really wanted to be independent above all else, even when it made things harder for us. I was offered the chance to do exams in a separate area and be able to leave when I was done but I wanted to do them in the Hall and have to sit there for hours. We had teaching assistants who sat with us and most of us used every opportunity to ditch them or go without, half to prove we can do things by ourselves but half so we could join in. 

Joining in: This brings me happily onto my second point. A lot of that first point was solely just to be able to join in. Yes, in the modern day it’s more of a… ‘Man, I was I could play games well,’ thing, but in a fantasy world it might be some great Tourney or Hunt, or simple childhood games in the woods that the protagonist wishes to join in with. 

More than bullying, it was the people who tried to tell me I couldn’t do anything that hurt me. Bullies got told off sometimes, or came and went, but people like my mom or teachers saying what I couldn’t do; that sticks. 

TL:DR: It’s the circumstances that change, not the emotions. 

Avoid The Badass Blind Monk Who Can Kick Your Ass Trope

Yeah, unfortunately being blind can be a problem. As a half-blind person myself, and knowing how lucky I am to have any sight at all, I do find it annoying the amount of blind characters who seem to only be blind so that the audience can be amazed when they start pulling off amazing martial arts moves, or knowing exactly where things are to pick up, etc.

This isn’t to say your character won’t be able to learn martial arts, or maybe some magic that helps them with placement, etc. That’s fine. But please include drawbacks of actually being blind, things that blind readers would identify with and that readers with sight would learn a lot from. 

For example, yes, it can be quite scary, when you are alone, and you can’t open your eyes. You don’t know who’s around you, friend or foe or terrifying monster. The protagonist never has to admit their fears or problems to others if that’s their character, but they can admit them to themselves. And, in that way, they can hopefully overcome them, too. 

Finally, It’s not the best movie ever, but I’d also give The Village a watch, especially the scene in the forest. It handles the protagonist being blind quite well in that regard. But you’ll need to try and read some books that describe the situation, too.

Things they don't tell you about being a first time wheelchair user in highschool

Literally everyone will ask if you broke your leg(s). Everyone. Even people you don’t know. Theyll ask a lot and think you’re extremely fragile.

bruises show up within the first day of rolling around, and they can really suck

people will try to grab your chair if they think you’re struggling and it can be hard not to snap at them for it

static electricity is a huge issue. You will probably either continuously shock your leg when you’re rolling around or do what I did today and zap someone so hard as you pass that both of you nearly keel over

people will call you out as a faker if you do anything even remotely fun ever on your wheelchair. Wheelies? Obviously your legs are fine lol not like you have to go down fucking curbs /s

puddles are the worst and if there’s a curb with a puddle all around and you have some ability to walk its a better idea to just stand up and navigate the chair than to fall backwards into said puddle

weird looks from people are inevitable, especially from people who don’t like you

bus drivers will often push your chair and give you advise you don’t want to hear, even if you tell them nicely you can push yourself. Its really hard not to get mad at them for it

no wheelies in school. Though if you do it in the elevator when no one else is with you you can’t really get caught.

speaking of wheelies, always be ready to throw at least one arm behind you in case you fall. They say tuck your chin in but its easier and more reliable to throw your hands back and keep your neck up so you don’t hit the floor. Sore arms are way easier to put up with than head injuries

don’t even bother to try and roll back up curbs. You will either be there for an hour or fall backwards. I managed to do both.

90% of classrooms that aren’t special ed are not very wheelchair accessible.

people will automatically assume you’re faking something if you’re not considered dumb enough in their standards to fit in with disabled students (aka high class ableism at its finest)

people are going to give you weird looks if you don’t suddenly start sitting with the other disabled kids

standard backpacks usually dangle way too much to keep on you easily, so try to pack light

built in storage on wheelchairs cannot sufficiently carry books

don’t try to hold an umbrella. Period. Especially not with your teeth. It doesn’t work.

don’t try to give the bus driver your ticket while you’re stuck on the ramp. And speaking of, its easy to start falling down the bus ramp so be careful, and when in doubt throw on the breaks

and finally if you’re like me pray to god you don’t go nonverbal when someone is trying to push you and you don’t want them to because it is hard to get them to stop if you can’t speak

able-bodied people can and should 1000% reblog this, some of these things I’ve seen on tips about using a wheelchair but a lot of these weren’t things I’ve seen

If you were born as you are in a world where everyone had superhuman fighting abilities, you would be considered disabled.

If you then studied martial arts for 10 years to gain fighting abilities, you would still be disabled, because you had to put years of effort into doing something that everyone else does naturally, and because there would still be fighting moves that you’re not able to do (for example, no amount of martial arts training will make you able to throw someone across a room).

Disabled people learn coping techniques to survive in a world that was not designed for them. Even after learning the coping techniques, they are still disabled.

Disabled people’s lives are not tragedies.
Parents and carers are not “heroes” for loving disabled people.
Disabled people’s private moments should not be shared without consent on your “warrior mom” blog.
Disabled people are not your pity hires, dates, or friends.
Disabled people do not exist to be saved or spoken for by non-disabled people.

Treat disabled people with respect and dignity.
Treat disabled people like people.

Shoutout to all the people who grew up dreaming big only to have chronic illness take your dreams away
Things I've learned since becoming ill...

• It’s nobody’s fault. It is genetic. It just happened.

• Do not be too proud or stubborn to ask for help. You need it.

• Brush your teeth and wash your face (even just with a baby wipe) everyday if you’re able to do so. It makes you feel more human.

• Shower or bathe whenever you are able to. Good personal hygiene is good for your mental health.

• Some people will leave. You don’t need those people. Others will stay and they are wonderful human beings.

• You are not a burden. You are not useless. Do not be guilty. Please. Guilt will eat your insides.

• You have not lost who you are. You just now have to make adjustments to accommodate this new thing.

• Accept the fact that you have an illness. Being in denial will only make your mental and physical health worse.

• Clean pyjamas are a divine gift. As are clean bedding and blankets.

• Self care is entirely subjective. If you want to do yoga then do it, if you wanna sit and eat takeout in front of the TV in a squirtle onesie then that’s fine too. Whatever makes you feel good, or at least better.

• If you are tired then rest. Do not burn yourself out. It doesn’t matter what time of day it is, if you need a nap then you have one.

• Talk. Write. Sing. Paint. Draw. Dance. Do something to express your feelings. Don’t keep them inside. You’ll explode.

• Don’t worry if you can’t adjust right away. It takes time. A lot of time.

• Do not feel ashamed or embarrassed. Unfortunately illness often has embarrassing symptoms or such. It isn’t your fault. People who allow you to feel embarrassed about such things are terrible people.

• Keep your sense of humour. Some days it’s the only thing that gets you through.

• There will be good days. Grab them with both hands and enjoy them. Savour them. Spend them doing things you love, things that you can’t do on bad days.

• Prepare yourself to the best of your ability. Like…always have a hospital weekend bag packed for emergencies, keep a bed day drawer or bag near to where you sleep, have food or snacks close by, always have a water bottle…

• Take your meds. Please. If you have a serious illness for the love of god don’t listen to the “big pharma” conspiracy theorists. You need your meds. They keep you alive. They enable you to function.

• Research your illness. Keep yourself informed. But don’t dwell on what might happen. Please don’t scare yourself.

• It’s okay not to feel positive all the time. It’s okay to feel down. It’s perfectly natural. But try to be as positive as you can. For your own sake.

• Your own health comes first. It’s not selfishness it’s survival.

• Be kind to yourself.

• The bad days can be horrific but the good ones are beautiful, and so worth holding on for.

• Don’t give up on love. Just don’t.

• You are a badass warrior.

Sympathy is only for the able.

People only care that you are sick as long as you are going to get better. Once they find out it is a forever thing, their sympathy suddenly has an expiration date.