dinosaur-of-the-day

5

i thought that in spirit of this holiday i would make some valentine’s day cards 

4

etsyfindoftheday | gifts for a valentine: plant lovers | 2.7.17

dino planters by twotreesbotanicals

i love me some classic jurassic park, and stegosaurs are my fave … but all of these painted dinosaur planters are on my gift list!! their cute faces look so happy! i want all four.

Dinomas Day 11: “Nanuqsaurus having a snowball fight with their tails”

The sun shines brightly on this winter day and the two Nanuqsaurus siblings decide to engage in their favorite game, but not without wearing a nice set of winter gear. :D

Fun fact: When I went about to paint the snow, it started to snow in my home area, so I could actually do kind of a life drawing of the environment.

Well, it might be a bit early, but that’s just a question of the time zone you are in.

@a-dinosaur-a-day

Eocypselus vincenti, E. rowei

By Fraizer on @saint-nevermore

Name: Eocypselus vincenti, E. rowei

Name Meaning: New Swift

First Described: 1984

Described By: Harrison

Classification: Dinosauria, Saurischia, Eusaurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria, Tyrannoraptora, Maniraptoriformes, Maniraptora, Pennaraptora, Paraves, Eumaniraptora, Averaptora, Avialae, Euavialae, Avebrevicauda, Pygostylia, Ornithothoraces, Euornithes, Ornithuromorpha, Ornithurae, Neornithes, Neognathae, Neoaves, Cypselomorphae

Why am I doing a very long ago described bird randomly and out of order? Because art was donated of it of course! Eocypselus is an interesting little bird that looks a lot like what you’d expect the common ancestor of Swifts and Hummingbirds to look like. A small bird, less than 13 centimeters in length, it also probably had black feathers. It was found in the Fur Formation in Denmark and the Green River Formation in Wyoming, and though right now it has two species ascribed to it, it’s entirely possible that more will be in the future (because bird paleontology does a lot more with species than nonavian dinosaur paleo). It lived in the Ypresian age of the Early Eocene, with Y. vincenti living between 55 and 53 million years ago, and E. rowei living between 53 and 48 million years ago. Though it shares many features with swifts and hummingbirds, it is not thought to be in Apodiformes (the group containing the two) proper; instead, it shows that that group evolved their small size first, and then went on to evolve the specialized flight capabilities (speed and hovering) later. It probably was black in coloration, at least E. rowei was, and its feathers made up half the size of its wingspan. It also would have fit in the palm of your hand, and probably was an insectivore. 

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eocypselus_rowei

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cypselomorphae

Harrison, C. J. O. 1984. A revision of the fossil swifts (Vertebrata, Aves, Suborder Apodi) with descriptions of three new genera and two new species. Mededelingen van de Werkgroep voor Tertiaire en Kwartaire Geologie 4(21): 157-177. 

Ksepka, D. T., J. A. Clarke, S. J. Nesbitt, F. B. Kulp, L. Grande. 2013. Fossil evidence of wing shape in a stem relative of swifts and hummingbirds (Aves, Pan-Apodiformes). Proceedings of the Royal Society B 280: 20130580. 

Mayr, G. 2005. A new Cypselomorph bird from the Middle Eocene of Germany and the Early Diversification of Avian Aerial Insectivores. The Condor 107:342-352. 

Shout out goes to @justthatguyme!