dinoflagellate

The Gippsland Lakes in Australia is a beautiful example of bioluminescence.   Noctiluca scintillans, commonly known as Sea Sparkle, is the non-parasitic, marine-dwelling dinoflagellate that exhibits the bioluminescence throughout its cytoplasm when disturbed.

7 magical experiences from Malaysia that are so incredible, you’ll want to book your flight immediately!

Malaysia is no stranger to interesting and astounding locations. Wish you could be whisked away to these magical destinations right now?

THE TOP@KOMTAR — Penang

Experience new heights when you venture to THE TOP of Penang’s iconic urban peak to take in the breathtaking views of George Town. Watch the world go by from the comfort of the air-conditioned Observatory Deck at Level 65 and enjoy a cocktail from at the rooftop bar. Daredevils can put their fear of heights to the test on the open-air Rainbow Skywalk, situated a thrilling 249-metres above ground.

Sipadan Island — Sabah

via GIPHY

Ask any seasoned divers about their top five dive sites and Sipadan will almost always come up. Malaysia’s most famous diving destination is where you can meet the ocean’s most exotic creatures. Giant mantas, barracudas, turtles and varying species of sharks are just some of the aquatic marine life that roam beneath the water’s surface.

Soak in the pristine reefs and underwater biodiversity at this island paradise before sweeping your leg up in a luxurious beach resort by the water’s edge.

Tusan Beach — Miri

Originally posted by slytherinnpride

Tusan Beach is a local sanctuary that is far more pristine and untouched than Miri’s more popular beaches, but that’s not its only selling point. Imagine wading into the warm unpolluted ocean, only to see blue lights shimmering all around you like your personal fairy tale. Due to the presence of an algae called ‘Dinoflagellates’, which produce a blue glow when disturbed by motion, the beach is also a great place for photo enthusiast to try out their low-light photography skills!

Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre — Sabah

Get a chance to meet Borneo’s most fascinating primates at one of the largest and oldest orangutan conservation centres just 25km north of Sandakan. Learn how these injured and orphaned apes are nurtured back to health before returning them back into their natural habitat. 

via Giphy

Check out the little ones from the nursery viewing area as they sharpen their swinging skills on the branches above, visit the outdoor platform during feeding time (10am and 3pm) where the apes congregate for milk and bananas, or embark on a guided forest walk through the Kabili-Sepilok Forest Reserve and be charmed by its huge trees, tropical plants and thriving wildlife within. Doesn’t get wilder than that!

Sekinchan — Selangor

Image: chee.hong

Mere 1.5 hours away from Kuala Lumpur, fertile soil has blessed this tiny beach side village with an abundance of yield, covering the land in a sea of endless green paddy fields that stretch as far as the horizon. Capture the verdant views up close, visit the Paddy Processing Factory and Paddy Museum for a lesson in rice agriculture, or indulge in a seafood feast along the popular ‘Seafood Street’.

Any of the 104 islands in the Andaman Sea – Langkawi

There’s nothing quite like a great beach vacation to relax and recharge. Now think about having 104 islands to choose from. Yep, 104 shades of azure, white sand and sky to show off beach bods of every size. Langkawi is basically an underrated Maldives, and with such an attractive exchange rate, there really is no excuse not to book a flight there right now!

Originally posted by ilsilenziodellasuatristezza

You might want to check out AirAsia for flight details to these awesome locations mentioned above. You’re welcome!

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Sea Sparkle (Noctiluca scintillans)

Also known as the sea ghost or fire of the sea, the sea sparkle is a species of free-living marine dinoflagellate that is widely distributed throughout the world. Sea sparkles are often found along coasts, estuary and shallow areas of continental shelves. N.scintillans is a heterotroph (meaning it gets its own food)  and will feed on other plankton like diatoms, fish eggs, bacteria and even other dinoflagellates via phagocytosis. Unlike other dinoflagellates N.scintillans goes through a life cycle that has a diploid and a haploid phase. True to their name sea sparkles are capable of bioluminescene and when they congregate in high concentrations (usually from environmental conditions) they are known as red tides. Although they are known as ‘red tides’ not all sea sparkle blooms are red, and color is derived from the pigments of organism inside the vacuoles of the sea sparkles. When disturbed N.scintillans will bioluminesce and produce a blue light earning them the ominous names of sea ghost and fire of the sea.

Phylogeny

Chromalveolata-Dinoflagellata-Noctiluciphyceae-Noctilucales-Noctilucaceae-Noctiluca-N. scintillans

Images: Maria Antonia Sampayo and Hans Hillewaert

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During the day, everything seems normal. At night, this beach turns into something out of a fairy tale.  

By day, this beach in the Maldives islands seems like any other tropical paradise. By night, however, the beach turns into another world thanks to the bioluminescence from the phytoplankton known as dinoflagellates in the water.

The ethereal blue glow is caused by a reaction between the dinoflagellates’ cell membrane and electrical signals. 

No magic, no chemicals, just nature in all its wonder.

You may still feel miffed from high school over not grasping the concepts of chemistry or biology, or for not being able to ever figure out where a dang spleen is. But science forgives you, because science loves everyone – even the people who slept through it. Think about how many things around you that were either invented or improved by science. Gravity. Nuclear fusion. The crock pot. Those were all science, baby, and we’ve got more science-y goodness coming at you right now.

Glowing orbs have been a sci-fi staple forever, and now you can have your very own with which to scare teens in the woods. This glass sphere is filled with bioluminescent dinoflagellates that glow when agitated and live entirely off sunlight. And no, dinoflagellates aren’t dinosaur farts. It’s cool – we thought they were for a little while too. Get a Dino Sphere for $49.95.

9 Things To Remind You Just How Much Science Rules

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Dinoflagellates! These bizarre microorganisms are found all over the ocean, and occasionally freshwater lakes and ponds. Some are photosynthetic, some are predators, some are both! They are also the plankton responsible for toxic red tides. 

The first two pictures show Pyrocystis dinoflagellates.  These are closely related to the dinoflagellates that bioluminesce a bright blue along coastal waters. In the top picture, you can see a cell dividing its nucleus into two, as well as some sort of protective cyst in the lower right corner.

The 3rd picture is a bloom of Gymnodinium dinoflagellates, and the last picture is a close-up. See the nucleus?

More neat facts: some dinoflagellates have 215 billion base pairs in their genome. For comparison, the human genome is made up of about 3 billion base pairs! No one really knows why they have so much DNA, most of which is heavily modified and wrapped with re-purposed virus proteins. 

5 amazing glow in the dark creatures.

I Recently read About these amazing glow in the dark creatures in the newspapers and thought it was worth sharing

1.  Saprobe Panellus Stipticus, Fungi:

Found in Asia, Australia, Europe and North America, the bioluminesence emitted by the Saprobe fungi tht grows on decaying wood is called Foxfire (not fiefox).Also called fairy fire, it emits green light.

2. Firefly Squid (Watasenia Scintillans):

Japan’s tiny “Firefly” squid emits a blue bioluminescence. These emissions allow the firefly squid to communicate with other members of its species, warning them of predators and to lure fish into its bait.

3.  Glowworms:

Found in the Caverns of New Zealand and Australia, glowworms not only emit light to attract prey, but drop sticky silken thread from cave ceilings. This thread creates a cool visual effect similar to looking at the stars on a clear night.

4. Crystal Jelly ( Aequorea Victoria):

Found off the coast of North America, Crystal Jelly amits a green-blue glow with over 100 tiny, light-producing organs surrounding the body. It is collected for its luminiscent photo-proteins which are used as bio-markers in research studies on genes and to detect calcium.

5. Dinoflagellates

Found in both fresh and salt water, Dinoflagellates can produce a brilliant bioluminescence. When they are disturbed, either naturally or by man-made waves(boats, swimmers, fishermen) the water surface lights up with a beautiful blue glow.

Pretty amazing-nature Huh?…

5 amazing Glow in the Dark Creatures.

I Recently read About these amazing glow in the dark creatures in the newspapers and thought it was worth sharing

1.  Saprobe Panellus Stipticus, Fungi:

Found in Asia, Australia, Europe and North America, the bio-luminescence emitted by the Saprobe fungi that grows on decaying wood is called Foxfire (not firefox).Also called fairy fire, it emits green light.

2. Firefly Squid (Watasenia Scintillans):

Japan’s tiny “Firefly” squid emits a blue biol-luminescence. These emissions allow the firefly squid to communicate with other members of its species, warning them of predators and to lure fish into its bait.

3.  Glowworms:

Found in the Caverns of New Zealand and Australia, glowworms not only emit light to attract prey, but drop sticky silken thread from cave ceilings. This thread creates a cool visual effect similar to looking at the stars on a clear night.

4. Crystal Jelly ( Aequorea Victoria):

Found off the coast of North America, Crystal Jelly amits a green-blue glow with over 100 tiny, light-producing organs surrounding the body. It is collected for its luminiscent photo-proteins which are used as bio-markers in research studies on genes and to detect calcium.

5. Dinoflagellates

Found in both fresh and salt water, Dinoflagellates can produce a brilliant bio-luminescence. When they are disturbed, either naturally or by man-made waves(boats, swimmers, fishermen) the water surface lights up with a beautiful blue glow.

Pretty amazing-nature Huh?…

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Fuck Yeah Physics!


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Microscope Monday: Dinoflagellates Unite

How many creatures do you see moving through the water? If at first glance it looks like just one, don’t be deceived. This dinoflagellate, called Polykrikos hartmanii, forms “pseudocolonies,” in which several individual organisms (called zooids) are joined together, hunting for other dinoflagellates to feed on. A single pseudocolony can contain anywhere from 4 to 16 individuals. It’s thought that these pseudocolonies form because of incomplete cell division: Another nucleus forms, but the new cell doesn’t break off. (Video: Tim Mullady)

Have you ever seen coral under the microscope?

Well now you have! This is a coral called Frogspawn coral. One of its tentacles had to be removed because it was attacking another coral! See the bleached edges of the red plate coral?

This is a common behavior among corals and sea anemones. They can send out those extended tentacles filled with stinging nematocysts, which are basically poisonous harpoons. Some of you might have had some personal experience with nematocysts- if you’ve ever had close contact with a jellyfish, that’s what caused the stinging! Makes sense, since jellyfish and corals are actually closely related

And that’s what they look like at high magnification. The arrow on the left is pointing to the spiny string that can penetrate like a hypodermic needle. The arrow on the right is the empty cell were the nematocyst was previously coiled up. Overlaying the cell is a cell with a nematocyst that has not yet been released. Note all the strings in the background- those are more nematocysts! 

You’ll notice that the tentacle is chock-full of little red-brown dots. Those are actually symbiotic algae called zooxanthellae (don’t ask me to pronounce that) that live in coral by the millions and help the coral gain energy. To be more specific, those algae are dinoflagellates, which I’ve featured on my blog before

Whenever you head to the beach, look for signs like this. No, not the nude bathing part, but the water quality part. Some parts of America and the world experience serious dinoflagellate or bacterial blooms which can be harmful to your health. Always take a peak at the signage to make sure there are no health advisories before jumping into the water.

[Echo] (a supernatural x danny phantom crossover)

for mabel-but-slytherin​ Here’s everything I could get done on your bday haha. A finished and actually named version will go up on fanfiction as soon as I can get it edited with reconciled povs…

Danny, Sam and Dean W. ~4k. K+


They’d seen some freaky stuff in their day. Reanimated corpses that were decayed enough that they could have started the skeleton war, people who had been torn to shreds around an inexplicably intact appendix, the one guy with the third shoulder blade out in Iowa…

But the house that they were looking at now just might take the cake. Dean weren’t even sure it could be classified as a house, what with the rusting debris hanging from the top two stories. Sam had eyed it warily while he had knelt to pick the lock– locks– in record time in case the stuff felt like dislodging and dumping the equivalent of a car or two on the top of their heads.

Things only got weirder once they were inside. The first few rooms they slowly walked through looked fairly normal, actually. Carpeted floors, a couple couches, what would have passed for a nice TV back in 2004. Nothing in sight to justify the handgun loaded with cold iron that Dean held in front of him except for years of training– never break into anyone’s house unarmed, even if it has clearly been abandoned for years– and the prickle zinging up his spine.
Sam’s shoulders were stiff too, though, and he moved behind him slowly, almost reverently, trying not to disturb the dust or the silence. 

Keep reading

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My pets!

These close relatives of jellyfish and sea anemones are known as Aiptasia. They are infamous in the saltwater aquarium trade as invasive pests, but that doesn’t matter to me! I actually took one from a saltwater tank, saving it from being pulled out and left to die or poisoned. Owners were okay with it :-)

Right away it started budding off adorable little Aiptasias.

These organisms are also important for the study of dinoflagellate-cnidarian symbiosis, since they harbor photosynthetic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae). Most of the corals we know of also harbor these algae. Coral bleaching is when these algae die off. 

Microscope videos to be uploaded soon! 

“Obon” Artist Miya Ando released 1,000 non-toxic resin leaves coated w/ phosphorescence into a small pond in Puerto Rico. During the day the leaves would “recharge”, & by night, give off a ghostly, ethereal glow. The installation “Obon” was inspired by a Japanese Buddhist festival of the same name, & to simulate Puerto Rico’s bioluminescent bays, a natural phenomenon caused by dinoflagellates, photosynthetic underwater organisms that emit light when agitated.