digitalgov

The History Of The United States Looks So Cool In GIFs

Social studies teachers across the country are celebrating right now.

The U.S. National Archives ― aka the official record-keepers of America ― uploaded a lot of historical GIFs on Friday. Teaching just got hella more fun!

More coverage of our new National Archives Channel on @giphy​ from the @huffingtonpost​: The History Of The United States Looks So Cool In GIFs | Huffington Post

Frustrated in your search for the perfect #ReactionGIF?

Our new National Archives Channel on @giphy provides a slew of #ArchivesGIFs to choose, including a number reaction GIFs. But maybe you need some guidance?  

DCist took a look and breaks it all down in  A Handy Guide To Using The New GIFs From The National Archives: DCist


Need to convey excitement? 

Originally posted by justalittletumblweed

Befuddlement? 

Originally posted by todaysdocument

Or just waxing poetic?

Originally posted by todaysdocument


See the rest of DCist’s recommendations at A Handy Guide To Using The New GIFs From The National Archives.

And don’t forget to check out all our GIFs on Giphy!

Announcing History Hub from the National Archives!

We’re excited to announce our new pilot project!

Do you have research questions you’ve always wanted answered? Do you want advice on how to get started with genealogical research?

Now you can ask them on the History Hub.

History Hub is a pilot project, connecting experts at the National Archives, researchers, and the public with discussion boards, blogs, profiles, and other interactive tools for communication and collaboration. The History Hub provides us a platform for eventually working with other cultural organizations—such as the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress—to offer the public a one-stop shop for crowdsourcing information.

The History Hub is a limited six-month pilot project so that we can test the platform for its use and usefulness as a crowdsourcing platform. For the pilot, we are working on a narrow set of topics that have been identified as good test cases for this platform, including genealogy and Native American research.

Do you have research questions you’ve always wanted answered? Do you want advice on how to get started with genealogical research? Give it a try and ask a question at historyhub.archives.gov.

Do You Have Suggestions for NARA’s Digitization Priorities?

As the National Archives sets out on its ambitious goal to digitize all of its holdings, planning just how we’re going to accomplish this is critical to our success.  One of the first steps in that plan is prioritizing what will be digitized. No prioritization would be complete without the feedback and suggestions of the people who discover and use our records every day.  

What would you like to see the National Archives digitize over the next few years?  Is there a particular theme, topic, or event on which you would like to see our digitization efforts focused? 

Now is your chance to tell us! From now until August 14th, engage in the discussion about digitization priorities in our online town hall on Crowd Hall. Post ideas, provide feedback, make suggestions and then vote on your favorites.  

Since our holdings cover a lot of topics, we’ve broken them down into broad categories:

  • Science/Tech/Health: Agriculture, Environment, Public Health, Science and Technology, Space and Aviation
  • Military & Veterans: Military/Wars, Veterans
  • Culture & Heritage: Civil/Political Rights, Genealogy, Ethnic Heritage, Immigration/Emigration
  • Government & Law: Diplomacy/Foreign Affairs, Intelligence, Court Records, Law Enforcement, Maritime Administration, Geography and Land Use

Curious what’s already been digitized? Check out the National Archives Catalog.
(Most of the items we feature here on Today’s Document come directly from the Catalog - just follow the source link on every post.)

What records would you like the National Archives to digitize next?