digital-art-tutorial

Tips for Illustrators (and other artists too!)

I’m an illustration major at MICA (please check out my blog here as a way to support me for making this post!), so this is catered towards what I learned in my illustration critiques and from professional illustrators. I think these tips can go for other artists too, though!

None of these are things that work all the time, but they’re general “rules” I’ve been taught. You can break them, just know why you’re doing so! These are just things I copied from my critique notes, so most are general tips I’ve heard and copied down.

General

  • Enjoy what you’re working on, but be okay with changing it.
  • Anatomy, and accurately trying to portray it, is really important.
  • Time and space can be portrayed through focus and distance.
  • When working digitally, make some of your own textures (traditionally) and scan them in. Adding them into a picture adds an element of your own hand and makes your work stand apart from other digital work.
  • Contrast is a great thing.
  • Saturation is a great thing, especially in watercolor (soak that brush with pigment!).
  • Your style should never draw an obscene amount of attention to itself; it should just work fluidly.
  • Consider what medium(s) work best for your idea.
  • Cover your paint palettes (particularly reusable ones) to make sure dust doesn’t get in the paints.
  • Spin the page when you’re working. The time is takes to do that will show some major improvement in your art!
  • Use dark watercolor and then a light colored pencil on top, never the other way around (it will look muddy and ruin clarity).
  • Make sure to sometime pin or place you piece far away and step away so you can see the whole composition (or zoom out a lot digitally).
  • Consider the genre and audience of what you’re working for (and if it’s yourself, then you’re your own audience!).
  • Illustration is a branch of fine art, don’t forget that.
  • Fantasy art usually needs a lot of high detail.

Coloring

  • Pick an overall color palette to work in, then add in other colors as needed.
  • Complementary colors (ones opposite on the color wheel), when placed next to each other, can pop an object forward or draw attention to it. (Think of a red ornament on a green Christmas tree).
  • Designate the shadows to be either warm or cool, and the highlights to be the opposite. Stay with this throughout the entire picture.
  • All colors have a warm and a cool hue (cool and warm blues, cool and warm oranges).
  • The more saturated a color is, the more it will pop forward in the picture plane.
  • Don’t use colors right out of the paint tube.
  • When making a shadow, tint the color with the complementary tone (it makes it a little more grey).
  • Colorizing backgrounds lines makes them recede in a colored image with line art.
  • Blue and pink tones are great for use in skin tones.
  • Flats need to be fairly differentiated colors.

Drawing

  • The reference should never be an excuse for a misleading or awkward pose. You have the artistic license to alter an awkward pose and not just draw from a photo.
  • With scratchy or textured line art, find some places of solid black too, to allow the eye to rest (or where you want something to pop out).
  • How you render all the elements of the picture is what makes your own individual style.
  • When something is illuminated, it should be the brightest part of the composition.
  • Anything with a straight angle (like the corner of a room) has one wall/side being lighter in value than the other. There is a crisp distinction.
  • Sometimes adding more lessens the strength of the image.
  • Fabric folds are crisp, if they’re too soft they’ll look like clay.
  • Line heaviness and weight can determine depth.

Anatomy/Characters

  • Anatomical consistency is very important.
  • Inside of the mouth is usually dark.
  • Show character motivations with actions and poses.
  • You can crop a face or figure to set a mood.
  • In any and every picture, pay special and close attention to the hands, feet, and face.
  • Learning musculature, even if you use reference, will help you create the body you want for your character. Understand the human form…it’s easier to alter if you understand it in the first place.
  • To pop a figure forward, add a little bit of rim lighting (great with backlighting).

Composition

  • Avoid spots where a line or shape comes really close, but doesn’t cross, the edge of the paper. This is called a tangent and tangents are bad (they suck the eye into just that one spot and stop the composition).
  • Nothing in the picture is accidentally there, it is all drawn by you, so make sure everything has a conscious placement.
  • Don’t crop anything that shows essential character expression (including essential parts of the pose).
  • Never crop a figure at a joint (it makes the limb look amputated unintentionally).
  • Consider how you show detail with smaller characters…what are the essential characteristics?
  • Shapes of color or tone can make great framing devices.
  • For the most part, render the foreground with more clarity than the background…you want atmospheric perspective to be used to make it look like it’s receding.
  • Line heaviness/weight can combat (in a good way) any very dark areas.
  • When the character breaks a border (shape, line, panel etc), it shows dominance.
  • Make the shape of your negative space visually interesting.
  • “Cornerstops” are great. They are a compositional element that visually blocks your eye from running off the corner of a page.
  • Shadows can be a great compositional element.

Narrative Illustration (Portraying the narrative)

  • It is a successful illustration if the story is told.
  • Use every element of the image to tell the story.
  • Sometimes you have to take out elements you love for the sake of storytelling.
  • Think of images as being fast/slow, quiet/loud. What techniques portray these senses for you, and why are you using such techniques? What areas of the picture are slower and faster, why those areas?
  • Indicate how lavish or simple a place is by the details you choose to include in the background.
  • Don’t make it obvious that you “curated” the picture; it should look natural.
  • Cover illustrations don’t always need big and bold text, as long as there’s a strong narrative being portrayed.
  • Something mid action carries the narrative better than pre or post action.
  • You should be able to tell a story without relying on text.

Sequential Art (Comics, etc)

  • Color between panels can draw the eye around the page.
  • Big jumps in narrative can add humor and excitement, just make sure to think of why you are having the jump there.
  • When starting a sequence, make it obvious where you start (establishing shot; biggest to smallest, etc).
  • Make sure panels can read as separate images even if you took the gutter away.
  • Smaller panels are frequently used for faster/quicker actions.
  • Removing the background in certain panels allows the scene to be read faster; you only need one background per page (unless the scene in the background is changing).
  • Style, readability, and timing are key things to keep in mind.
  • Does the punch line/climax happen at the right time on the page?
  • Before planning a page, ask yourself: “How much time is elapsing between the first and last panel?”
  • Consider panel shape and size.
  • The composition, and where the eye flows inside every panel, informs where the eye travels to next…compositionally lead the eye from panel to panel.
  • The more panels you have, generally the more time goes on.
  • Don’t rely on speed/action lines to make things dramatic.
  • Give word bubbles a little breathing room.
  • When doing a graphic novel, you’ll usually have to redraw the first few pages since the characters will come more naturally to you by the end pages.
  • There is a design element to sound effects.

Digital Art (Mostly Photoshop based, but some are general tips)

  • Before printing, you usually want to switch your file to CMYK (though save a file in RGB too). Print at 300 dpi.
  • Before printing, you can up the brightness, saturation and contrast until it just starts to look awkward. You’ll learn the best settings for the printer you print at.
  • Don’t place digital textures anywhere. Consciously arrange them.
  • Don’t overrender. Digital art tends to be the most successful when it feels less digital than someone would expect.
  • If your color scheme doesn’t look cohesive, you can use a fill layer of one specific color to unify everything (Layer->fill layer). Lower the opacity to around 15-30%.
Digital Painting: tips for beginners

Heyo! I got asked if I could make a tutorial on digital painting so I’m gonna throw together some advice meant for people who are starting out and want to figure out exactly how this stuff all works. Because it’s hard! What I hope to accomplish here is to make painting more approachable for you.

Firstly, I have put together something like this before, so for archival purposes here it is: http://holy-quinity.tumblr.com/post/89594801811/i-dont-know-how-much-of-this-kind-of-thing-you

For those of you who don’t wanna bother reading that, here are the main points:

1. Learn your program and its tools, from brush properties to layer styles. And I mean learn them. Make a cheatsheet that shows you exactly what each button and scale does, both in isolation and in conjunction with other buttons and scales. Refer to this as much as possible until it is intuitive. The end goal is to know exactly what to do to your brush’s settings to achieve a given effect.

2. It’s perfectly okay to use your sketches, linearts, and other forms of line in your paintings. They can help guide the form and there’s no need to make something fully “lineless”! I never make things “lineless.”

3. Study other people’s art and try to think how they could have possibly achieved the effects they did. You can learn a lot just by observing and mentally recreating the process stroke by stroke—muscle memory is a powerful tool at your disposal. This becomes easier to do once you’ve started doing item 1 above.

OKAY!

So where the heck do you even begin?

What I’m gonna do is try to make digital painting as approachable as possible for someone who’s never really done it. The main idea here is that digital painting is just like real painting. So if you’ve ever done real painting, you already kinda know what’s coming.

I’m gonna assume you know the basics of digital art: you can sketch, line those sketches using layers and opacity changes, and fill the lines with color, maybe even opting to add some shading…and you’ll get something like this:

You know, cell-shaded, or maybe the shading’s blended, but you’ve still obviously a line drawing with color put down on layers beneath the lines.

The next intuitive step is to try going “lineless”…but when you remove the lines you get this:

idk about you but I’m laughing at how stupid this looks

When I was first teaching myself to paint digitally, I didn’t really know how to deal with this. Without lines, the form of the subject vanished or became a mess like the above. Even if I was meticulous and careful about placing down the color such that without the lines layer turned on, the shapes fit together, it didn’t look quite right. There’d be gaps, I wouldn’t know how to incorporate the subject into a background, the contrast wouldn’t be high enough, or it’d just in general look too much like a screenshot from Super Mario 64.

Painting requires a different process than the above. You’ll have to let go of some of your habits and conventions. Such as staying in the lines. Such as fully relying on the lines. Like, I love my lines, I love my sketches—but in painting, they are guides for form, and are not the form itself. So let me go through how I approach a given painting:


My painting process starts with a sketch (here a boring portrait for demonstrative purposes). I make the opacity of the sketch layer something like 30%, and then throw down my base colors on a new layer underneath. I’m not being meticulous about the sketch itself, because again it’s just meant to guide my placement of color. I’m also not meticulous about my placement of the color.

We’re essentially sketching with color. Because ultimately what we want is for the color to take on the form and shapes conveyed by the sketch.

There’s a lot going into this about how to use value, how to shade, how to use color, etc. that I’m kinda skipping over because it takes a lot of time to explain…but there are hundreds of tutorials out there on those topics so please, google around! I found some helpful tuts that way when I was starting out.

Something I find v useful is to keep selecting colors that already exist in your image for shading and hue adjustment. This is why I start with really blendy, low-opacity brushes when throwing down color on top of the background. I can then select colors within there that are a mix of the two.

For instance, I’ll select the color of the lines here:

…and use that to shade:

And maybe I’ll select one of the darker shades around his eye, but not the darkest, to make the shading a smoother gradient…and so on.

What I do in general at this point is go over the shapes and lines of the sketch. Such that I can turn off the sketch layer and see this:

I’m replacing the lines with shading and value. I’ll continue to do this as I keep adding color.

This is all super loose. I am not dedicated to any particular stroke. I just want the colors and shading and light source to be right. I’ll use overlay layers to boost contrast or add a hue.

Here are other examples where I used this process:

I am constantly changing brushes and brush settings as I paint. It really depends on what effect I want where. I am also constantly selecting new colors and applying or blending those in. I don’t believe in having some uniformly applied base color and then shading with only one or two…that’s what I’d do if I was cell-shading like the first drawing I showed you here, but painting should be about messing with color and opacity and blending to make millions of hues!

Good rule of thumb: Hard, opaque brushes for applying color. Soft, dilute brushes for blending colors. Sometimes hard, dilute brushes can make some cool blending effects! I personally prefer harder edges on my shading so that’s a brush I use often.

This is getting a bit long so I’m gonna split it up into multiple parts, but really what I want you to get from this is:

1. learn the tools at your disposal until they are intuitive

2. sketch and line are guides for form, not the form itself

3. rather, hue and value will produce the form

And of course, practice makes perfect!!! Every drawing you make, every painting you make, will bring you one step closer to the artist you want to be, and thus every drawing and every painting, no matter what, is a success.

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!! ART TUTORIAL !!

This is my first real attempt at doing a walkthrough for one of my landscapes, I’d really appreciate some feedback!

it is pretty much my workflow process, there’s always something slightly big to change during render I should have solved earlier!

Anyway everyone, feel free to message me if you have any questions and I hope this helps anyone!!

Da, da, da, daaaaaaaa…… that’s a little more dramatic than I had intended. I love all these wonderful Sai tutorials that get posted on here but I haven’t seen much attention payed to Sai’s Lineart tool which I can’t get enough of. I’m sure there probably are Lineart Layer tutorials out there - I just haven’t come across one so I’m just adding to the pile. The Lineart tool is so awesome it deserves any number of tutorials anyway. It’s so easy to use, it saves me so much time, and it offers so much control which I really love. Honestly, the tool is so easy to use that this is less of a tutorial and more of just a general encouragement to just whip it out and start playing with it. Yeah. So say we start with a simple line like this swirly-wirly thingy that I drew with the marker tool. Well, the first step would be to create a linework layer by clicking the linework layer button.

There we go. Now, a lineart layer in Sai is different from any other regular layer in Sai and it will bring up a completely new range of tools. I’m gonna briefly go through them but the best way to understand exactly what each does is to just try them out for yourself. There’s no substitute for experience or however the saying goes.

  • Pen - This is your freehand lineart tool and to best honest I don’t really use it that often. That’s just me personally. I have an expensive gaming rig that has all sorts of magic running under the hood but we all know that Sai’s memory management is pretty crappy and I don’t need the lag or crashes that come with this tool when working at a high DPI. You may have a different, entirely pleasant experience with this particular tool but for me, if I’m doing freehand inking, I’d much rather just use the regular Pencil tool.
  • Eraser - Kinda speaks for itself.
  • Weight - This one I do love. Say you’ve drawn a line - or a path as Sai calls it. With this tool you can adjust the thickness of the particular line by simply selecting the brush size and then clicking on the line.
  • Color - Same as Weight. Simply select your desired colour and then select the desired line you’d like to change. Very useful. For the aesthetic.
  • Edit - This one comes with its own subset of mini-tools that I’ll get into in a moment. But this is definitely a useful tool - for me it’s probably the most useful.
  • Pressure - This is the one that adds the character to your linework. I’ll explain further below.
  • SelPen - A selection tool. Pretty standard. Since the Lineart layer works in ‘Anchor’ points (which again, I’ll get in to further down below) I don’t really use this one.
  • SelErs - Selection Erase. Goes hand in hand with the SelPen. I can’t say that I personally use this one  much.
  • Curve & Line - The Curve and the Line tools are the cornerstones of the Linework layer. I’m explain both further down.

The Edit tool, as I mentioned, brings up its own list of sub-tools. And they definitely have their uses. Again, it’s best to play around with them to truly get a grasp of what they do but I’ll just run through them quickly before I get on with the main tutorial.

  • Select - For selecting anchor points of paths. Honestly, I don’t really use this one too much simply because hovering over a point or path and clicking will select it.
  • Move/Add - Now this one I use a lot. Moving an anchor will affect the curvature of your line if you’ve used the ‘Curve’ tool, or you can add curves to a straight line by clicking and dragging in between anchor points.
  • Delete CP/Curve - Kinda speaks for itself. It will delete an achor point in your line. Sometimes this can be useful for making your curves rounder if you’ve added too many points to it.
  • Deform Path - Again, kinda self explanatory. It will warp your line. I don’t really use this one myself but that’s not to say that it couldn’t have its uses.
  • Deform Anchor - See above.
  • Move Path - Instead of moving just an anchor or adjusting the curvature of your line you can move the entire line at once. Can be useful.
  • Duplicate Path - Does exactly what it says - creates a copy of your line. Haven’t found much use for this simply because I don’t particularly like copy/paste stuff in linework. Faults or differences add character.
  • Delete Path - deletes a line you’ve drawn independently of other lines on your linework layer. Can be useful as well.
  • Connect CPs - This is difficult to explain the benefits of. It’s one that should be experimented with. It basically joins lines together. I use it quite often. Just pick this option and drag from one anchor point to another to join them.
  • Pointed/Rounded - See the diagram below for this one. I find it very useful.

As you can see I used the Curve tool to draw a simple curve (left) and then I used the Pointed/Rounded tool to convert the curve into a point (right) by selecting the tool and then clicking on the anchor point at the height of the curve. I find it very useful. Anyway, back to our swirly-wirly thingy.

Because our swirly-wirly thingy is basically one long curve, I simply select the curve tool and start clicking. Starting at the centre point on one end, I click to add anchor points as I trace the shape of the object. Each point adjusts the curvature from the last point. It’s kinda hard to explain verbally or even visually but try it out and you’ll quickly see how it works.

Once I have a line over whatever I’m inking done I like to adjust the weight to suit my preferences. I like to work with thicker lines because they give more room to play around with weight. So to adjust the weight you click on the Weight tool, select a brush size and then click on your line. If only it were that simple in life.

Once I have a good weight selected I move on to the Pressure tool. The pressure tool gives you two options. Pressure for width and pressure for density. Width is like controlling the weight of the line at individual points and density controls the transparency. I don’t usually use the density option. As with traditional inking I prefer to denote depth, shadow, etc. with weight as you can see in the image above. To adjust the pressure, simply select the pressure tool and then select an anchor point. Click, hold and drag to the left to make the line thinner of more transparent and to the right to make the line thicker and more dense. As you drag, a percentage will appear over the anchor point you’ve selected. This can be useful for keeping things consistent.

That’s all well and good for curved lines but what about straight lines? That’s where the line tool comes in. It works exactly the same way except it won’t add a curvature to your anchor pints. Still very useful though. Especially when combined with the Weight and Pressure tools.

Here’s an example of one my drawings. It’s Dark Empress Kitana from Mortal Kombat. The one in red is the pencils which if converted to black would probably make a pretty good linework layer. I’m a firm believer in taking the time to clean up your sketch/pencils layer because it will dictate your entire drawing. The one below in black was done using Sai’s linework layer feature. Although not entirely.

As much as I love Sai’s linework layer, it can look a little too clean which is not great when you’re drawing people. Although, it’s all art so it’s all up to personal preferences and personal style. There’s no wrong way to do it. For me though, I prefer to do skin, facial features, hair, etc. by hand using Sai’s Pencil tool on a normal layer and reserve the Linework Layer for architecture, clothing or any non-organic substances. I inked Kitana’s eyes and eyebrows freehand ( or as freehand as you can be with Sai’s amazing stabilisers) but everything else such as her armour or her fan weapon thingy was done using the Curve and Line tools on the Linework Layer.

I hope this tutorial has been useful. Or if not useful - then at least encouring to try out Sai’s linework layer. It’s such a robust feature that I don’t see get much attention and I can’t even begin to describe how much time it saves me or how much I adore it. If you have any questions (because I’m well aware how unsuited I am to writing tutorials - this is so damn rambly - sorry!) then feel free to drop me an ask here at keithbyrneart.

P.S, sorry about my handwriting in the stills. It’s gotten a lot messier these days.

on painting skin

imo painting skin is more about lighting than shadows or really anything else? if you create a dark base and build light up on top of it the shadows will form naturally.

a big thing is the coloring of the cheekbone area, it is NOT always like this. coloring the cheekbones is completely determined by the MOUTH!

in its most basic form the corners of the nostrils connect to the corners of the mouth and coloring the cheekbones should be determined based on the line between them! light hits off the highest point on the cheekbone and moves outward from there, a scrunched up face would have fewer highlights and more shadows for this reason. 

How to erase grey/white outlines on line art on Photoshop

One of the biggest frustrations for digital artists is when we separate traditionally scanned line art and then it has the dooming grey areas around it like this: 

Ugh! It totally kills how the line art looks, right? 

Fortunately, this has a super duper easy fix. 

Just lock the line art layer: 

And then take a big dark colored brush (or whatever color you want the lines to be) and paint over the entire layer. It’s locked, so it will only affect the actual lines! 

Then voila~ 

SO much better!! Now just clean up the lines as you like and all that jazz. 

P.S. If you want to make traditional line art colored, you do this same thing but then choose the colors you want instead of just a dark brush. :) 

Reblog to save a frustrated artist who has beautiful line art that deserves to fully shine~!

ask-jack-eevee  asked:

I'm interested in trying to make a similar seamless image like the dragon one you did. Have you ever done a tutorial on how to do that? If not would you be willing to? Even a few small tips is fine.

I’ve always wanted to make a tutorial! So here’s some semi-coherent ramblings, feel free to ask more questions of any of it doesn’t make sense!

Hope this helps!

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WOOOO REUPLOADED AS A MILLION SEPARATE HIGH QUALITY IMAGES

Here’s a tutorial for you chicks n dudes!! I love lineart. With my entire being. I also hate it.

If you’ve got any extra questions feel free to shoot me an ask, and PLEEEEEASE don’t repost this anywhere without my permission. Thank you!

Part 2 

Ahhh thank you again//// im kinda flattered you would ask me for tips;;;;; Well colouring is really VERSATILE and so many possibilities!!! So there’s no right or wrong way to colour//// Here is just some stuff on how I colour, hope it helps!!!

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Hi everyone! 

First of all, I just wanted to thank y'all for all the love on the last tutorial I posted -I’m glad people found it worthy of sharing and reading. I wanted to make this one more in-depth. I don’t think I would call this a “tutorial” to achieve something specific, but a look into the thought process that goes on regarding environments, storytelling and execution. Hopefully you can relate it to your own thought processes you currently have.

Have a good one, guys! If you got questions, do ask ‘em. :)

(Also. I know I’ve been quiet in posting new art lately. A lot of the art I can’t show yet but there is cool stuff on the way.) 

{  Finished piece -original post: Bright Autumn  }

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9

Soft Colouring Tutorial

I’ve been asked countless times what is my tecnique of colouring and well, this tutorial was promised long ago.

I made other tutorials on colouring but they’re getting old and I’m changing my ways. So, here we go, a soft colouring tutorial for you guys! c: As I wrote there, I am not a professional, so don’t take it as the only way to do it.  But I really, really hope I helped!  Enjoy!
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I did a hair tutorial for my Patreon! If you want to see more tutorials, please consider supporting me there :) 

hakimirektman  asked:

Im trying to draw(beginners) on my desktop do you have any suggestions and tips ? And what type of software do you prefer ?.

Ah!! I’m so happy for you!!  :D

Well I’m also a self-taught digital artist for the past… two years?  xD So I’m just gonna give you some tips based on my experience as a beginner so far.

1. Get a graphics tablet / pen tablet

You don’t need to get the fancy or expensive ones, anything compatible with your computer / laptop would do :)

-This would help SO MUCH when drawing! Its less time consuming and has features like the pen pressure, which can’t be found on a trackpad  / mouse :’3 

* they are kinda hard to get used to at first, but with lots of practice, you’ll get pretty good at it :) I actually put away mine for like a year because I gave up after using it after the first few tries xD  Please just… Don’t give up! ^^”

2. Suitable software(s)

There’s… a lot of softwares you can choose to begin with!

As for me, I begin using Sketchbook Express because I’m on a Mac.  Its a very simple and neat software for beginners! But not so many features they offer for making more professional looking arts . I suggest you get the free art programs first unless you’re very serious about pursuing into digital art. 

I heard Krita, MediBangFireAlpaca, and Gimp and  are also other good free softwares as well. 

^^^ download link is on the name of softwares (bold) ^^^

*Once you feel like you got the hang of it, you can try out those not-free softwares. Those have tons more features that you can experiment with!  :) As for me, I use Photoshop CC (I realised most professional Illustrators use this) , while others may use Paint Tool Sai (this software can’t be used on Mac),  or maybe an upgrade of other free-art software like the  Corel Painter and ArtRage. These programs have way more features you can try compared to the free ones. Even I’m still not an expert on my own software XD But we’ll get there someday! TvT”

3. Look up for tutorials! :D 

This is important, because digital art is a bit more different to traditional art in terms of its ability to do more. Some things important to know in digital art:

  • Layers 
  • Terms used in art softwares to work with often
  • Colouring
  • Brush effects
  • Other features you think is important to know…

I suggest learning these from youtube tutorials or online art classes like Schoolism . Also, If you’re also new in drawing, you should try looking up for fundamentals in drawing! It will help improve your art skill for both digital and traditional :) 

But if you’re already good at traditional art, digital would be a lot more easier for you to work with.

And yeah, thats from me I guess. Hope this helps! 

Drawing Process- Nico

Step 5- Line Art

In this step, I use a Mapping pen to outline the Finished sketch. 

It sounds easy- but in truth, this is the most difficult part for me.  The lines need to be as even and consistent as possible.

This step can take anywhere from hours to a full day- and is by far the most complicated and LEAST fun part of drawing fanart.

First I start with the finished sketch I prepared in the last post.


(as the last check for proportions and such I flip the finished sketch upside down and a few other directions- changing the direction of your work helps you spot any wonky things)

Then I turn the prepared Final Sketch layer blue and lower its opacity.

Then I start my outline.  After doing this so many times I have found that I start from one point every single time- the head.  Particularly the eyes. From there I draw outward. But I always start at the eye.

I prefer to make my lines thin at first.

Once that is done I remove the sketch layer.


I remove dust- my software has a cool little button for that, so it is no hassle- you probably cant even tell that I did anything to it. But once the color is on- you will be able to see those tiny black dots and stray lines. 

I also thin out any lines that are too thick.  I use a Curve Line tool with clear paint- or just the Snap eraser to do this.

Next, I thicken lines, close gaps, and add black where there should be ‘deep shadows.

Here is a quick example of cleaning, closing gaps, and thickening.

^^^ This is done while CLOSELY EXAMINING THE ENTIRE PROJECT.  It is EXHAUSTING and takes FOREVER. DX

^^^ After that fun is done, I prepare the line art for Step 6- Base Colors by filling in my line art.

I use the paint fill tool for this- and adjust the ‘close gap’ setting as needed to properly fill the work.

The hair needed to be filled in by hand- for that I used the G-Pen tool.

The coloring is next!


<<<< Step 4- Finished Sketch                              Step 6- Base Colors >>>>

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Hi everyone! In my past tutorials, I showed how to paint over 3D models to speed up the drawing process (for artists who hurt their hands or just want to put out more art in a shorter period of time for comics). In this tutorial, I’m using a photo base instead of a 3D render.

The differences are it’s harder to control the lighting in a photo (hence the extra editing in Lightroom), and it’s harder to extract lineart. in 3D you can just render the lineart, but photos can’t do that. I mentioned the Filter Forge plugin in this video which I used for making the background look painted, although not demonstrated in this video, Filter Forge also has lineart extraction filters. I’ll probably be showing the lineart feature in the future :)

I’m thinking of doing short narrated videos of specific techniques in the future, so stay tuned! (I need to work up the courage to record my own voice lol)

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New Head Painting Tutorial is up on youtube! Thought it might be helpful to get some basics of painting across while painting up this old dude. I’ll walk you through the lay in, talk about form , brushstrokes and edges in 5 minutes. Feel free to join me over at my Tumblr and Instagram for more updates and tips!

A little teaser: my new Skin Tutorial series is in the works. I’m adding 6 new natural skin tones and repainting all the old ones, plus a few fantasy skin tones. This is the revised “Ebony” tone.

You can see the tutorial develop on Patreon. (Nothing there yet–commission bound/Illuxcon prepping currently). I plan for this to be the first of many future tutorials because damn, I miss making them!