diamonds & pearls era

3

PRINCE Dancer “Diamond” Worn Body Leotard

From the collection of a former employee of Paisley Park, a Vivienne Westwood designed body leotard worn by Prince’s dancer “Diamond” (Lori Elle) during Prince’s “Diamonds & Pearls” era. Inside there are two Vivienne Westwood labels, one with “Lori” written on it in pen.

Pokemon Card of the Day Schedule: Mysterious Treasures

The second set in the Diamond and Pearl era, Mysterious Treasures brought more new Pokemon to the game. It brought some solid Pokemon, most notably Blissey, but it was the Trainers that really shone through. Cards such as Bebe’s Search, Night Maintenance, Team Galactic’s Wager, and Time-Space Distortion saw plenty of play, and in one case, made people really hate the game rock-paper-scissors. No, that’s not a joke. While not the most impactful set in the long run, it did bring a few important cards along.

2/20: Aggron
2/21: Alakazam
2/22: Ambipom
2/23: Azelf
2/24: Blissey
2/25: Bronzong
2/26: Celebi
2/27: Feraligatr
2/28: Garchomp
3/1: Magmortar
3/2: Mesprit
3/3: Typhlosion
¾: Tyranitar
3/5: Uxie
3/6: Abomasnow
3/7: Gyarados
3/8: Mantine
3/9: Nidoqueen
3/10: Ninetales
3/11: Toxicroak
3/12: Ursaring
3/13: Walrein
3/14: Dewgong
3/15: Bebe’s Search
3/16: Dusk Ball
3/17: Lake Boundary
3/18: Night Maintenance
3/19: Quick Ball
3/20: Team Galactic’s Wager
3/21: Electivire LV.X
3/22: Lucario LV.X
3/23: Magmortar LV,X
3/24: Time-Space Distortion

HOLY MOLY i just thought of a cool AU

and for once it’s not a role swap AU

imagine SU where everything is the same except all of the gems wear outfits that resemble different time periods in history

like, imagine the diamonds and their pearls wearing renaissance era dresses

imagine all of the crystal gems wearing outfits that match different time periods of the 20th century

imagine lapis in a victorian era dress

imagine jasper dressed up like a pirate from the 1600s

imagine how cool fusion outfits would look

this is such a good idea i’m glad i just thought of it

4

THE POKEMON ANIME: SOME DETAILS

In case you’ve been living in a damp cave in Antarctica, Pokemon Go is the big thing in town right now. The Pokemon Company has been collectively forcing players of all ages and gaming backgrounds to get their butts outside and catching ‘em all. So, in honor of this resurgence, we’re going to talk a little bit about the anime (which is still going, mind you).

NUMBERS: The anime has had nearly 1000 episodes (935 at the moment), 21 films, and has been broadcast in over 70 countries around the world. While there are many seasons, the main anime is currently divided into 5 blocks: the original series, Advanced Generation, Diamond and Pearl, Best Wishes, and XY. Each block correlates to an era in the franchise: Gens 1 and 2, Gen 3, Gen 4, Gen 5, and Gen 6, respectively. In the dub, the show has had 19 different theme songs. Speaking of…

DUBBING: The anime was initially dubbed by 4kids Entertainment, a powerhouse for bringing popular childrens’ anime to the west. It was also a powerhouse for localization issues–most of which were due to broadcasting standards. A rewatch of the show displays some inconsistencies with dubbing choices. A scene notoriously has the cast repeatedly refer to onigiri as “jelly doughnuts,” but another episode refers to them plainly as riceballs. Dubbing is a weird science. The dub is now done by Pokemon USA alongside DuArt.

THRIVING: Masaki Iwane, an animator, once stated that the anime was only supposed to have a run of about a year and a half. It’s kept going on sheer popularity. It’s the third-longest running animated series ever, only being beaten out by The Simpsons and Arthur on PBS.

TEAMWORK: Pokemon is aired by TV Tokyo over in Japan, and has been aired on a variety of other countries globally. The show’s main writers have been Takeshi Shudo and Atsuhiro Tomioka. Producing are the big names from the game side of things: Ken Sugimori, Satoshi Tajiri, and Junichi Masuda. OLM inc. is the studio working the magic.

PRANKING: The first episode of Pokemon aired on April 1st, 1997. If you count it as an April Fool’s joke, it’d probably be the longest.

Pokemon can be watched on Netflix and on the Pokemon TV app