diamondback-terrapins

Blastoise variants! This time I did body variants (top row) and some color/subspecies variants (bottom row) 

Things can cross around too, like a Red-eared Slider subspecies in the Battle body variant or an Aquatic Diamondback Terrapin. Would be fun getting to draw some of those too…

(oh yeah I wanted to do a Matamata subspecies but forgot to draw it fff had the refs open and everything but it got lost in all the other tags…maybe I’ll add it later)

Carolina Diamondback Terrapin - Malaclemys terrapin centrata

An attractive adult male of the Carolina Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin centrata (Testudines - Emydidae), a subspecies found from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to northern Florida, in the United States.

Reference: [1

Photo credit: ©Kevin Stohlgren | Locality: Glynn Co., Georgia, US (2013)

Made with Flickr
3

Diamondback Terrapin Babies at National Aquarium

Recently, the National Aquarium’s Conservation team welcomed 51 hatchling Diamondback Terrapins from the aquarium’s site at Poplar Island.

Diamondback Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are native to brackish coastal swamps of the eastern and southern United States. Their range stretches from Cape Cod to as far as the Florida Keys.

After passing their Animal Health exams, these tiny turtles have remained under watchful eyes. In a few weeks, the hatchlings will be distributed to schools throughout Maryland as part of the National Aquarium’s “Terrapins in the Classroom” program!

Through this program, students and teachers are charged with caring for a little turtle all school year. They collect growth data, observe behaviors, learn animal care skills and research the natural history of the species. In late spring, the students release the terrapins back onto Poplar Island. The hatchlings are quarter-sized right now, but throughout the year they grow steadily in a warm, clean classroom tank with all the UVB and basking heat they could want…and without fear of predators!

Find the rest of the story at: ZooBorns.com

photosgraphs via: National Aquarium