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100 Days of Productivity // Day Nine

Wow! Sorry this is so late at night, but I got through a lot more bio today, which is good! But I actually still have to work on a presentation I have tomorrow for my humanitarianism class. Thank god I don’t have class until 1pm, which means I feel a lot less guilty about sleeping really late tonight!

🎧 Giovane Fuoriclasse - Capo Plaza


Science Fact Friday - Tapetum lucidum!

So why don’t all vertebrates have this adaptation? It’s an advantage to animals that are active in the dark - cats, dogs, owls, raccoons, crocodiles, and so on - but it makes everything slightly blurry. Many daytime vertebrates (including humans and most other primates) do not have one and instead have better day vision.

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Edwin D. Babbitt. The Principles of Light and Color. 1878-1896.

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Geometry at work: Orbital Resonance, Sound and Water

Richard Proctor, Old and New Astronomy, 1892

What men recognized then in the movements of the heavenly bodies is true now and true for all time. And even in dealing with the limited knowledge and the imperfect methods of ancient astronomers, we need not hesitate to consider these movements as they are now recognized and understood.

Ernst Chladni, Die Akustic, 1802

Nodal lines of vibrating circular or polygonal  plates, according to Chladni and Savart.The breakthrough work acquired a status of foundational work of a new scientific field and earned him a title of “father of acoustics”. It was the first systematic description of the vibrations of elastic bodies.

Snowflake Man

Wilson Alwyn “Snowflake” Bentley (February 7, 1865 – December 23, 1931), is one of the first known photographers of snowflakes. He perfected a process of catching flakes on black velvet in such a way that their images could be captured before they either melted or sublimated.

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Geometry at work: Sea animals, Fruits and Vegetables and Plants

The Nautilus

The nautilus (from the Latin form of the original Ancient Greek ναυτίλος, ‘sailor’) is a pelagic marine mollusc. Although not a golden spiral, the nautilus shell presents one of the finest natural examples of a logarithmic spiral.

Geometry of fruits and vegetables

When sliced in half, the majority of the depicted fruits and vegetables will display a geometric shape or pattern, based on symmetry or platonic solids.

The arrangement of leaves

Phyllotactic spirals form a distinctive class of patterns in nature, depicting the  arrangement of leaves on a plant stem.
The basic patterns are alternate, opposite, whorled or spiral, many of them arranged based on consecutive fibonacci numbers.