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SHOWCASE PRESENTS SERIES 1 ACTION FIGURES
Based on the classic stories in the SHOWCASE PRESENTS Library!

Four DC characters are presented here as they were portrayed by some of their top artists! This inaugural series includes Superman by Curt Swan, Batgirl by Carmine Infantino, Hawkman by Joe Kubert, and Jonah Hex by Tony DeZuniga. Each figure features multiple points of articulation and a base.


Advance-solicited; On sale June 18, 2008 o Action Figures o PI

JONAH HEX 6.75"


HAWKMAN 6.75"


SUPERMAN 6.75"


BATGIRL 6.625"

SUPERMAN INCLUDES ALTERNATE RED KRYPTONITE HEADS

Filipino Comics Art Fridays | Ernie Guanlao

Every Friday, I take a look at the work of one of the almost 200 Filipino artists who illustrated horror, sword-and-sorcery/fantasy, western, sci-fi, and war comics for American publishers during the 1970s and early 1980s. The “Filipino Wave,” as it came to be called, saw the likes of Nestor Redondo, Alfredo Alcala, Alex Niño, Tony DeZuniga, Rudy Nebres, Ernie Chan, and many others pencil and/or ink scores of issues for DC, Marvel, Warren, and other outfits, helping define the look of an era.

This week’s featured artist is Ernie Guanlao.


Ernesto “Ernie” Guanlao made his American comics debut in the September 1975 issue of DC Comics’ The Witching Hour, illustrating a six-page short story written by Carl Wessler:

He would go on to draw five strips for DC between 1975 and 1979, all written by Wessler, including the featured story (“… and in this corner: Death!”) in The Unexpected #188 (November/December 1978):

In between his sporadic DC assignments, Guanlao continued to work in the Philippine komiks industry and he also found time to illustrate Pendulum Press’s unofficial comics biography of the Beatles.

Guanlao made the permanent move to the United States in 1985, eventually settling with his family in California and embarking on a prolific 20-year career as a designer and storyboard artist in animation. He would make a brief return to comics in 1989 to pencil NOW Comics’ four-issue miniseries adaptation of Terry Gilliam’s The Adventures of Baron Munchausen.

Guanlao’s many animation credits include The Transformers: The Movie (character/background designer and storyboard artist), G.I. Joe (30 episodes, layout artist), The Real Ghostbusters (13 episodes, character designer), Animaniacs (24 episodes, background layout artist), RoboCop: Alpha Commando (40 episodes, storyboard artist and prop cleanup), House of Mouse (45 episodes, prop designer), and Kim Possible (7 episodes, prop designer).

Guanlao passed away in 2010 at the age of 67.


Ernie Guanlao’s American comics bibliography:

  • The Adventures of Baron Munchausen: The Four-Part Miniseries #1 (NOW Comics, July 1989): pencils only
  • The Adventures of Baron Munchausen: The Four-Part Miniseries #2 (NOW Comics, August 1989): pencils only
  • The Adventures of Baron Munchausen: The Four-Part Miniseries #3 (NOW Comics, September 1989): pencils only
  • The Adventures of Baron Munchausen: The Four-Part Miniseries #4 (NOW Comics, October 1989): pencils only
  • The Beatles (Pendulum Press, 1979)
  • Codename: Ninja #1 (Solson Publications, January 1987): inks only
  • Ghosts #73 (DC Comics, February 1979): “Phantom of the Catacombs”
  • Secrets of Haunted House #17 (DC Comics, October 1979): “The Dread Sting of Death”
  • Secrets of Haunted House #20 (DC Comics, January 1980): “Heads You Lose!”
  • The Unexpected #188 (DC Comics, November/December 1978): “… and in this corner: Death!”
  • The Witching Hour #58 (DC Comics, September 1975): “The Witch of Raven’s Pass”

To view all of the previously posted Filipino Comics Art Fridays entries, click here.

Filipino Comics Art Fridays | Domy Gutierrez

Every Friday, I take a look at the work of one of the almost 200 Filipino artists who illustrated horror, sword-and-sorcery/fantasy, western, sci-fi, and war comics for American publishers during the 1970s and early 1980s. The “Filipino Wave,” as it came to be called, saw the likes of Nestor Redondo, Alfredo Alcala, Alex Niño, Tony DeZuniga, Rudy Nebres, Ernie Chan, and many others pencil and/or ink scores of issues for DC, Marvel, Warren, and other outfits, helping define the look of an era.

This week’s featured artist is Domy Gutierrez.


Domy Gutierrez worked primarily as a spot illustrator in the Philippines through the 1970s, although he did contribute to a number of local, Tagalog-language comics, most prominent of which was a graphic novel adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’s The Count of Monte Cristo

Incidentally, Gutierrez’s first American comics work was also an adaptation of a literary classic: working alongside compatriot artist Angel Trinidad, he illustrated Pendulum Press’s graphic novel version of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The House of Seven Gables, published in 1977.

It would be almost three years before Gutierrez’s second (and final) American comics work would see print, a four-page pencil-and-ink job DC Comics’ Ghosts #85 (February 1980):


To view all of the previously posted Filipino Comics Art Fridays entries, click here.