devil doctor woman

bee-cake-deactivated20150916  asked:

Hello, Tena! Do you have a good list of Asian horror films? I'm on a kick tonight and want to watch some good ones! Thank you so much in advance (:

Ah, an excellent choice.  Asian horror is one of my favorite flavors (okay, so all flavors of horror are my favorite, so sue me).  In any case:

If you have access to Netflix:

  • Ichi the Killer (2001)
  • Ju-on: The Grudge (2002)
  • The Host (2006)
  • Helldriver (2010)
  • White: The Curse of the Melody (2011)
  • Zombie Ass: Toilet of the Dead (2011)
  • Dumplings (2004)
  • Tormented (2011)
  • Dororo (2008)
  • Sick Nurses (2007)
  • Strange Circus (2005)
  • Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky (1991)
  • Battle Royale (2000)
  • I Saw the Devil (2010)

(Sadly, they’ve removed quite a few titles recently)

Available elsewhere online:

Guinea Pig film series:

Bear in mind, all of these are pretty strong stuff.  The series is notorious for a reason (the second one in particular for being falsely mistaken for a snuff film).  Some of the other films above, such as Tetsuo: The Iron Man, and Bunman: The Untold Story, contain some pretty graphic and disturbing imagery.

I’m only disappointed that I couldn’t find links for Organ (1996), or Ab-Normal Beauty (2004).  Also, take note that some links may require a bit of cajoling to get things started (whether it be waiting for ads, or waiting for it to load).  I’m sure I’m probably forgetting a few good ones, as well.  In any case, enjoy! :3

hinatathepredatorylesbian  asked:

Is guinea pig as horrible as people say?

Well, the entire series is notorious not simply for the gruesome, somewhat malicious content of the films, but also due to one of the entries being mistaken for a genuine snuff film.  As I’ve mentioned previously, a copy of the second film, Flower of Flesh and Blood (1985) was given to actor Charlie Sheen by Film Threat founder Chris Gore.  Sheen, not being as familiar with horror cinema in general, mistook the film (excessive even by the standards of 80’s horror) as legitimate snuff, and turned it over to the FBI.  Because of this, as well as investigation from Japanese law enforcement officials, the creators of the series produced a documentary titled Making of Guinea Pig (1986), which profiles how the effects were created for both Flower, and and third entry in the series, He Never Dies (1986).

Flower was also the film mistakenly believed to have been confiscated among the film collection of Japanese serial killer Tsutomu Miyazaki, and speculation was given that the film had served to influence him in his killings.  In reality, it was the series’ fourth entry, Mermaid in a Manhole (1988), that was discovered among his belongings.

I have discussed in the past just why these films were created, and why they gained such a cult status among horror fans.  Unlike even more intentionally vicious and barbaric fair like Tumbling Doll of Flesh (aka Psycho: The Snuff Files; Niku Daruma) (1998), the Guinea Pig series was not intending to be fetishistic in it’s portrayal of horror and gore, because it is completely lacking any truly sexual element to any of the films.  The blanket term of “guinea pig” stems from the common theme of people being used as experimental subjects, which is, more often than not, painful and torturous, and typically resulting in death.

Films in the Guinea Pig series:

  1. Guinea Pig: The Devil’s Experiment (1985) - As far as films go, it is hard to classify this among others, as it is completely without plot or character development.  It attempts to create what a true snuff film might possibly look like, though fails right from the start by giving us an explanatory text introduction.  What follows is literally nothing more than the prolonged, explicit torture of a captive woman by a group of men, under the guise of testing the human threshold of pain.  It is quite graphic in its depiction of gore, which I believe is really the entire point.  It isn’t meant to “entertain” us.  It is meant to shock us, and make us feel uneasy, despite also forcing us to watch due to our own, innate curiosity of the inner workings of the human body.  It is a group of effects people trying to push the boundary of realism in horror effects.
  2. Guinea Pig 2: Flower of Flesh and Blood (1985) - Much like the first film, the second film not only begins with explanatory text, but also revolves around the torture and dismemberment of a captive woman.  However, this time around, there is only one man, inexplicably dressed as a samurai, and spouting poetic lines in between each act of mutilation.  It is also shot in a much more artistic manner, and (while still not particularly “enjoyable”), comes off with a higher level of sophistication and aesthetic merit.  This may be due to this entry being directed by celebrated horror mangaka, Hideshi Hino, based on one of his stories.  In the end, its intention appears to be equating gore with the beauty of nature, but is also really just the effects team (headed by Nobuaki Koga) showing off their skills.
  3. Guinea Pig 3: He Never Dies (1986) - This installment is the first to make an attempt at a plot and characterization, and has to do with a man, driven by a woman to attempt suicide, discovering that he can endure any amount of pain and dismemberment, not only without feeling any pain, but without dying.  Like the previous entries, it revels in excessive gore, but this time around, it is a male inflicting it upon himself, and the overall tone of the film is much more comical.
  4. Guinea Pig 4: Mermaid in a Manhole (1988) - This is another entry directed by Hideshi Hino, based on another of his stories.  It concerns a man finding a mermaid in a sewer, and bringing her home to tend to the wounds she has, only for her condition to continue to deteriorate (ostensibly the result of living in a heavily-polluted sewer).  During this time, the man attempts to paint a picture of the mermaid, and—much like another of Hino’s stories, “Zoruko’s Strange Disease”—eventually begins to use the effluence from the numerous boils forming on the mermaid’s body as paint for his canvas.  The man eventually ends up killing the mermaid, or at least, what he thought was a mermaid.
  5. Guinea Pig 5: Android of Notre Dame (1989) - The fifth film in the series centers around a scientist with dwarfism trying to find a cure for his terminally-ill sister, using test bodies supplied by a mysterious stranger.  Unlike all of the other entries in the Guinea Pig franchise, this entry lacks the same taboo-breaking excesses, and its flimsy story is more along the veins of traditional horror (the most obvious influence being Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein).  While there is gore to be found, it is performed mostly on cadavers, and lacks the audacity and shock value of its predecessors, and overall stands out as an oddity of the series.
  6. Guinea Pig 6: Devil Woman Doctor (1986) - The last of the franchise is by far the most comical, to the point where it can be considered pure camp.  There is less a plot than there is a succession of patients with bizarre afflictions seeking help from the titular physician, who is played by famous Japanese drag actor, Peter.  Of course, the entire affair is rife with blood and gore, and—much like Android of Notre Dame—is wildly different in tone from previous installments.  Produced in 1986, it was actually intended to be the fourth film of the bunch, but was released as the final.
  7. The Making of Guinea Pig (1986) - This look behind-the-scenes of both Flower of Flesh and Blood and He Never Dies exists solely as proof to both the FBI and Japanese authorities that there was nothing but movie magic behind the brutality present in Flower.  It is nonetheless a fascinating look into the impressive work that went into the making of both films.
  8. The Best of Guinea Pig (1988) - This compilation exists purely as a showcase for the goriest moments from the franchise, with nothing new to add to the mix.

There is another Japanese splatter film, Lucky Sky Diamond (1989), that is often erroneously credited as being part of the Guinea Pig collection.  While it is short, gory, and bizarre (with a definite streak of malice towards yet another captive woman pitted against menacing and shady hospital personnel), it is a stand-alone film that has no association with the series.

Overall, the entire franchise (also produced by Hideshi Hino), existed initially to be a film adaptation of his manga work, but ended up becoming a unique part of Japanese horror history.  While newer filmmakers like Yoshihiro Nishimura have built their careers around films featuring outlandish levels of blood, guts, and violence, there have been no films since the Guinea Pig series ended that have matched the level of graphic violence and sheer malevolence of what has rightfully become known as the most infamous and reviled horror franchise in Japanese cinema history.

An Open Letter to Stephen Moffat (re: Sexism)

Mr Moffat, 

The following is meant as a general summary of the areas in which your writing could use work, in relation to  reducing the sexism your fan base has found within your writing. Given my bias, I will admit that it might not be entirely polite, though  I have endeavoured to be as fair in my advice as possible, and provide no more examples than absolutely essential for your understanding of the error of your ways. 

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