development dr

My kid does 13K in damage to studio equip, we handle it like lunatics.

[Part 1]

Some background:

I’m an audio engineer and score arranger full time in my self-owned business. It’s how I provide for myself, my fiancée (also CF), and my mother. I record, mix, and master for bands, voice-overs for local commercials, and write music for people’s weddings, college films, indie games, etc.. It was my passion since I was a child and every day I ask myself why I get paid to do what I do.

You know, until today.

I had a woman schedule to come in because she wanted me to record her monologue for an acting class. I thought it was going to be easy enough. I set up a mic and a music stand in the sound booth and got my workstation prepped for tracking. She was supposed to show up at 3:30, so when 4:00 came around, I called her to ask her if she was still coming. It was my last contract for the day and I was wanting to get home to my fiancée, dogs, and dinner.

“Oh, sorry sweetie, I’m going to be there soon. I just had to get my son from ex-boyfriend.”

Uh oh.

4:12, she showed up with her child.

To preface, I’ve never really wanted kids, and don’t really hate them either. But I’ve been childfree of mind for a decade now in league of several bad child experiences in public.

Anyway, I sat her down at the conference table and tried to talk to her about the contract and billing, etc., and just couldn’t because of the six-years-old pile of ovary droppings next to her.

“Mommy it’s cold in here.” “Mommy, I’m bored.” “Mommy, that guy has girl hair.” “Mommy, I want to play on the phone.”

The incessant whining went on for the entirety of the discussion. She did nothing about it. I had an ache in my stomach that this might be a rough session.

I was right.

I showed her to the sound booth, positioned the mic at face level, told her the basics of mic use, and then she floored me with a question.

“Can my son stay in there with you while I do this?” I insisted that he wait in the conference room (across the hall from the control room) because the control room wasn’t a very kid-friendly place considering the 120K of equipment at arms reach.

“But he’s a little angel.”

I shouldn’t have taken her word for it. I SHOULD NOT have taken her word for it. This kid was ANYTHING but. I let him in, told him to sit in one of the office chairs and don’t touch anything. Needless to say, he touched. I queued the recording arm and signaled her to start. She got three lines into her take before I hear a deafening screech and crash.

That little shit machine had just knocked over a $4,000 Korg into a rack with $9,500 of equipment. Completely shattered the touchscreen on the Korg, busted the dials off of half of the effects, and totaled my distressor that I use for almost all the vocals I track.

All of this, by the way, was the room’s length apart from where I told the crotch goblin to stay.

The kid, because of the loud noise, started full-lung screaming. Not crying. Not yelling. Screaming.

The mother, with no hesitation, ran over to the control room and DEMANDED to know what I did to her child. She cussed at me and accused me of hurting her little snot monster. Threatened to sue and even swung at me. When I told her that her precious angel had just racked up at least twelve grand of damages, she said “good”, spit on me, then stormed out, slamming every door on the way. So I pulled the security camera footage and had filed a police report. Grand total: $13,504.25. I also mailed her the bill for her session for good measure.

Of six years in the studio, this is my only truly terrible experience. Fuck mombies. Fuck having children. Thanks for making my vasectomy decision that much easier on me.

[Part 2]

Keep reading

Okay so this is super random but I saw a post a few days ago about Dr. Doofenshmirtz of Phineas and Ferb and father’s day (I cannot find it for the life of me so if you know which one I’m talking about let me know) and I was thinking about it just now and I realized…Dr. Doof’s backstories are the perfect way of thinking about villain motivations. From what I remember, almost every one of his evil schemes were based on some kind of traumatic experience. Each scheme involves some kind of crazy and outlandish machine and passionate speeches about the evils of lawn gnomes or whatever he’s angry about. BUT in the Christmas special he can’t come up with a reason to hate Christmas and therefore has no motivation to go through with his evil plan to ruin Christmas so he sort just goes along with it because “he’s evil” and it’s all just so pointless. WHICH IS EXACTLY HOW IT SHOULD WORK. Just like Dr. Doof, your villain needs a legitimate motivation to go through all the work and be passionate enough to fight with everything they have against the protagonist. Without it they’re boring, easily thwarted. and kind of listless. As goofy and stupid as some of the backstories are for Dr. Doof they make sense to him and that’s what makes for a great villain.

Ciel vs his twin and the true vengeful intent

This is purely theoretical seeing as we’re not even sure that the person who tried to kill Soma is Ciel’s twin but, assuming it is in fact the Twin and that he’s after revenge against his own brother for what happened four years ago, I’m wondering if Yana’s purpose in having the twins confronting each other precisely in this arc isn’t because it’s finally time for our!Ciel to reflect on himself and several choices that he made ever since their parents’ death.

What I mean by that is that if Soma’s shooter is in fact the Twin…

…then you can feel his dead cold anger and vengeful intent through the violence of the attack against both Soma and Agni.
Even if Agni was ultimately killed by the other man, if the Twin is Lord Sirius then Lord Polaris, as his butler and Agni’s killer, is obeying him anyway, so if ch126/127 were all about the Twin’s revenge, then you can just see how angry he is at his brother, which is why Agni was killed so violently.

And that’s precisely where the Twin could be different from our!Ciel, if that’s indeed him.

After all, we don’t know exactly what the Twin’s existence could have been like during these last 4 years and we don’t even know what he currently is (BD-like? still alive?), but what’s certain is that he wasn’t surrounded by what was left of his family all this time, unlike our!Ciel.

And that’s the thing, our!Ciel pretends that he only cares about revenge, that it’s the only reason he is still alive and I don’t doubt that he actually really believes it deep inside, but at the same time, Soma is right when he says…

…that Ciel is aware of the love around him, but that he refuses to accept it.

However, if the shooter of ch126/127 is Ciel’s Twin, then he wasn’t as lucky as Ciel during the last 4 years: from being sacrificed to being… revived/cared after by the blue sect, he didn’t get to be looked after by Lizzie, he didn’t get to meet the same people as his brother who cared about our!Ciel even if he always pushed them away…
So maybe that’s why his vengeful and murderous intent is greater than our!Ciel at this moment.

Because sure, our!Ciel believes he only lives for his revenge and he pushes people away because he’s indeed terrified of being happy, but at least he knows that he has people caring about him, which is not his twin’s case at all.

So if the two brothers indeed face each other in this arc, I’m thinking it might make Ciel realize that Soma is right when he says that Ciel only keeps trying to be alone with his revenge, but he definitely can’t manage to be doing that as well as his brother, since his brother truly has no one at all to divert his mind from revenge.

You could say that it’s as if Ciel’s twin would be revenge personified, because that’s truly all that he really cares about, whereas our!Ciel, despite inwardly believing that he only cares about revenge, might be lying to himself because “the love around him” ended up having an effect on him after all. 

We already had hints before that our!Ciel was more selfless than he thought + that he lied to himself during the previous arc when he said…

…because he endangered his life more than once trying to protect Lizzie (amongst other things).

So facing his twin might be what will trigger more development for Ciel, because it might force him to realize that if he truly was only living for revenge (without a care of anything besides that), then he would be a lot more like how his brother currently acts.

Not to confound, I don’t think Ciel will ever stop wishing for revenge, but reflecting back on all the choices that he made ever since his parents’ death is an important part of his character development, and maybe facing his twin is the only way to trigger that (besides the involvement of Soma and possibly Lizzie in his everyday life).

Finally, if the twin really is all about revenge (as I believe he could be) then…

…Lizzie is probably used (or going to be used) as a way to hurt our!Ciel as well, just like it was supposed to go with Soma and Agni.
Maybe the twin intends on making Ciel experience what it feels like to really be alone, like himself was ever since he was sacrificed on the altar, while Ciel managed to escape and stole his identity.

Obviously though, Lizzie probably doesn’t know about that part (and about Soma and Agni being attacked) and she stays with the twin because she’s confused about his revival (?) and pained at the thought of our!Ciel lying for the last 4 years. However, there is a strong possibility that the twin doesn’t care at all and she’s nothing but a pawn in order to get to our!Ciel and hurt him. 

TL;DR character development and self reflection for our!Ciel is probably a sure thing in case the one who almost shot Soma is indeed his twin and he’s looking for revenge against our!Ciel for everything that happened 4 years ago. 

Black History Month 2017

Planned Parenthood strives to create a world where sexual and reproductive health care is accessible, affordable, and compassionate — no matter what.

Black women have always championed reproductive freedom and the elimination of racism and sexism as an essential element of the struggle toward civil rights. This Black History Month, Planned Parenthood honors the resilience of Black women like Dr. N. Louise Young and Dr. Thelma Patten Law,  two of the first Black women health care providers at Planned Parenthood — and the resistance of women like Angela Davis who continue to fight for the full dignity, autonomy and the humanity of all women.

In commemoration of Black History Month each year, we lift up and celebrate those who have defied their time and circumstances to become Dream Keepers and freedom fighters. #100YearsStrong of Planned Parenthood could not be possible without the vision, tenacity and determination of those who have kept and protected the dream of reproductive freedom, justice and autonomy.

The 2017 Dream Keepers

Ida B. Wells-Barnett
Journalist, Civil Rights Activist

Ida B. Wells-Barnett was the most prominent Black woman journalist of the late 19th and early 20th century. Her research and reporting around the lynching of Black people helped to bring national attention to the crisis and pushed federal legislation to hold mobs accountable.

Marsha P. Johnson
Activist, Stonewall Rioter

Marsha P. Johnson, co-founder of the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR), is credited with being one of the first people to resist the police during the Stonewall Riots of 1969. On the commemorative anniversary of the riots in 1970, Johnson led protesters to the Women’s Detention Center of New York chanting, “Free our sisters. Free ourselves,” which demonstrated early solidarity between LGBTQ rights and anti-prison movements.

Former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm
Black Feminist, Former Presidential Candidate

In 1990, Shirley Chisholm — along with former Planned Parenthood Federation of America president Faye Wattleton, Byllye Avery, Donna Brazile, Dorothy Height, Maxine Waters, and Julianne Malveaux (among others) — formed the group African American Women for Reproductive Freedom to show their support for Roe v. Wade, doing so with what we now call a reproductive -justice framework. The former New York representative was the first African American woman elected to Congress. During her seven terms, Rep. Chisholm pioneered the Congressional Black Caucus and was an unwavering champion for women’s reproductive rights and access to health care, including abortion. In 2015, President Obama awarded Rep. Chisholm with the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award.

Dr. N. Louise Young

Dr. N. Louise Young, a gynecologist and obstetrician, opened her practice in Baltimore in 1932. She later operated a Planned Parenthood health center that was opened with the assistance of the local Urban League and other community partners.

Dr. Thelma Patten Law

Dr. Thelma Patten Law becomes one of the first Black women ob-gyns in Texas. She provided health care for more than 25 years at the Planned Parenthood Houston Health Center, which opened in 1936.

Faye Wattleton
Author, Advocate for Reproductive Freedom, Former President of PPFA

In 1978, Wattleton became the youngest individual at the time and the first African American woman to serve as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA). During Wattleton’s 14–year tenure, PPFA became one of the nation’s largest charitable organizations. Under Wattleton’s leadership, the organization secured federal funding for birth control and prenatal programs; fought against efforts to restrict legal abortions; and, along with reproductive health allies, helped to legalize the sale of abortion pill RU-486 in the United States.

The Coiners of Reproductive Justice

Black women’s existence has inherently challenged the “choice vs. life” argument. However the creation and coining of reproductive justice ushered in a new framework where women of color could express all of the ways their sexual and reproductive autonomy is systemically limited.

Dr. Dorothy Roberts
Author, Scholar, Professor

Dorothy Roberts is an acclaimed scholar of race, gender and the law. Her books include Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century (New Press, 2011); Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (Basic Books, 2002), and Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (Pantheon, 1997) — all of which have shaped and informed scholarship around reproductive justice.

@DorothyERoberts


Monica Roberts
Historian, Founder and Editor-In-Chief of TransGriot

Monica Roberts, aka the TransGriot, is a native Houstonian and trailblazing trans community leader. She works diligently at educating and encouraging acceptance of trans people inside and outside the larger African-American community and is an award-winning blogger, history buff, thinker, lecturer and passionate advocate on trans issues.


Dr. Iva Carruthers
Past President of Urban Outreach Foundation, General Secretary of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference

Carruthers uses her ministry as a vehicle for addressing social issues, particularly those involving people of African descent both in the United States and abroad. She is past president of the Urban Outreach Foundation, a nonprofit, interdenominational organization that assists African and African-American communities with education, health care, and community development.

@IvaCarruthers



Rev. Dr. Alethea Smith-Withers
Founder and Pastor; The Pavilion of God, Washington, DC; and Chair of the Board of Directors for Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice

Rev. Smith-Withers has been an active advocate for reproductive justice for many years. She is currently serving as the chair of the board of directors of Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice (RCRC). She is the founder and pastor of The Pavilion of God, a Baptist Church in DC.  She hosts “Rev UP with Rev. Alethea”, a BlogTalkRadio show.

@RevAlethea


Rev. Dr. Susan Moore
Associate Minister at All Souls Church Unitarian

Dr. Moore’s ministry has focused upon the challenges facing urban America. An HIV/AIDS and teen pregnancy prevention educator and trainer, she has worked with several community and faith-based groups, including the DC Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Planned Parenthood, and AIDS Action Foundation. She actively advocates for a national, coordinated AIDS strategy to reduce racial disparities, lower the incidence of infection, increase access to care, and involve all stakeholders.


Bevy Smith
CEO and Founder of Dinner with Bevy

A Harlem native and New York fashion fixture, Smith is outspoken about women’s empowerment and social justice. She gives back by connecting and engaging a network of top leaders to promote social change.

@bevysmith


Mara Brock Akil
Screenwriter and producer and founder of Akil Productions

Mara Brock Akil is the co-creator of hit TV shows Girlfriends, The Game, and Being Mary Jane.  She is a tireless advocate of women’s health and rights.

@MaraBrockAkil


Tracy Reese
American fashion designer

Relentless PPFA supporter, Reese is a board member of the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

@Tracy_Reese


Kimberlé W. Crenshaw
Scholar, Professor at the UCLA and Columbia Schools of Law

Kimberlé W. Crenshaw is a feminist scholar and writer who coined the term “Intersectionality.” Kimberlé  is the co-founder of the African American Policy Forum, which developed seminal research on Black women and girls and the school-to-prison pipeline and policing, including, respectively: “Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected” and “Say Her Name.”

@SandyLocks

Angela Peoples
Co-Director of GetEqual

Serving as the Co-Director of GetEqual, Angela is working to ensure that Black lives and gender justice is a guiding force in LGBTQ work.

@MsPeoples


Jazmine Walker
Reproductive Justice Leader

Jazmine is a big fine woman who specializes in reproductive justice and agricultural economic development.

Her dedication to public scholarship and activism is driven by a passion to amplify feminist and reproductive justice discourse around Black women and girls, especially those in Mississippi and the broader South.


Amandla Stenberg
Actress, Author

This Black queer feminist makes us look forward to the next generation of feminist leaders and thinkers.

Her YouTube video, “Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows,” clapped-back against the cultural appropriation of Black fashion and style and won our hearts.

@amandlastenbergs


Charlene A. Carruthers
National Director for Black Youth Project 100

Political organizer Carruthers is building a national network and local teams of young Black activists.  She is committed to racial justice, feminism, and youth leadership development.

@CharleneCac


Monica Simpson
Executive Director of SisterSong National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

At SisterSong National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, Simpson works to amplify and strengthen the collective voices of indigenous women and women of color to ensure reproductive justice through securing human rights. She has organized extensively against the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon the minds, bodies, and spirits of African Americans with an emphasis on African-American women and the African-American LGBT community.

@SisterSong_WOC


Deon Haywood
Executive Director, Women With A Vision, Inc.

Haywood works tirelessly to improve quality of life and health outcomes for marginalized women of color.  Since Hurricane Katrina, Haywood has led Women With a Vision, a New Orleans-based community organization addressing the complex intersection of socio-economic injustices and health disparities.  

@WWAVinc


Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
Congresswoman, D-TX 18th District

Congresswoman Jackson Lee has been a staunch supporter of Planned Parenthood and women’s health.

This year she has become a valuable champion as a member of the House Judiciary Committee, where she was vocal at both hearings displaying a clear understanding of the important role Planned Parenthood health centers play in the communities they serve. She also came to the floor on several occasions and attended a Planned Parenthood’s press conference, lending her voice in the fight against backwards legislation.

@JacksonLeeTX18


Del. Stacey Plaskett
Congresswoman, D-US-VI

Delegate Stacey Plaskett became a supporter of Planned Parenthood this year when she spoke out for Planned Parenthood health center patients during a Oversight and Government Reform hearing, where she is a member, commenting that she would like a Planned Parenthood health center in the Virgin Islands.

@StaceyPlaskett


Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton
Congresswoman, D-DC

As a fierce, passionate, Black feminist and reproductive health advocate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton has supported Planned Parenthood unwaveringly. She also sponsored the EACH Woman Act and, in 2015, held an event with young women on abortion access.

@EleanorNorton


Rep. Joyce Beatty
Congresswoman, D-OH 3rd District

Rep. Beatty has been an active supporter of women’s health during her tenure in Congress, cosponsoring legislation, signing onto pro-letters and always voting in the interest of women’s health.


Rep. Maxine Waters
Congresswoman, D-CA 43rd District

Since arriving in office in 1990, Rep. Waters has voted in the best interest of the health of women and communities of color, making a career of addressing these issues by closing the wealth gap.    

When I'm Sad, I Sort of Just Look at These Gifs and Feel Better

Feeling better yet?

What about now?

Now?

You sure that’s not a smile on your face?

Not working for you yet?

If not, comment some funny gifs of your own!

Who knows? Maybe some of your gifs will make another person’s day a world better.

8

dr. isaacs / alice gifset [Part 1 of 2]
    (requested by anonymous)

why is there a need for every dr game to have some character with a goatee 

Flightless Bird

Warning: This is very much based off of Season 1 Episode 4 of House and I suggest you read a synopsis of the episode before reading. I don’t want to trigger anyone or upset anyone because there is infant death in this. DO NOT READ THIS IF YOU THINK IT WILL UPSET YOU PLEASE!!!!

“A baby had a seizure?” Nico repeated after Will recounted the events of the hospital that day.

Exhausted, Will opened a beer he didn’t really want and chugged half of it. “Yeah. So the hospital administrator has the trainees taking samples of everything. Because another baby in another room started getting the same symptoms. Fever, low blood pressure, rashes. We had to isolate them.”

“Isolate them,” he repeated again. “And their parents?”

Will scoffed and ran his hands through his hair. “What, you think they’re going to tell us, ‘No give me back my seizing baby this instant!’?”

Nico placed a cold, gentle hand onto his. “Hey. Calm down.” Will sighed and nodded.

“I’m sorry. We just don’t know what’s wrong with them. And it’s driving me nuts because I can’t heal them if I don’t know what I’m healing.” He closed his eyes and took a deep breath. He sighed and chugged down the rest of his beer as Nico looked at him somberly. “Where’s Lily?”

“She’s asleep. She’s been asleep for a while, so I think she’ll wake up in a bit for a bottle.” He pushed his chair back and walked around Will’s. He began to run his hands through his hair, and Will shut his eyes and focused on the feeling of Nico’s fingers.

Behind closed eyelids, he could see the shallow rise and fall of the newborn’s belly as she breathed. He saw the clammy, splotchy skin, the look of discomfort in the small pudgy face so like his own daughter’s, and yet completely different. And completely helpless to say what hurt her aloud.

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BPD Is Not A Life Sentence

“One of the most harmful misconceptions about BPD is that it is a life sentence—that people with BPD will struggle with the disorder for their entire lives, and that little can be done about it. The term “personality disorder” does not help the situation, as it implies that there is something fundamentally flawed with an individual’s personality, or who they are as a person.

In fact, there are many reasons for hope. First and foremost, studies have found that rates of recovery from BPD are much higher than previously thought. In one of the longest studies on BPD, Dr. Mary Zanarini and colleagues found that, over 10 years following hospitalization:

86% of people with BPD stopped meeting criteria for BPD for at least four years.

50% of people recovered completely (as shown by no longer meeting BPD criteria and having good social and work functioning)

Many of these people were receiving some kind of treatment, but some were not. Although many people with BPD clearly struggle for a long time, BPD is not a hopeless diagnosis, and many people recover.

A second reason for hope is that treatment works. The most extensively researched treatment for BPD is dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT), developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan at the University of Washington in Seattle. DBT involves the following:

Weekly individual therapy sessions aimed at helping clients reach their goals, reduce self-destructive behaviours and move forward on a path toward a more fulfilling life.

A weekly training group that teaches skills in the areas of mindfulness (paying attention to the present), emotion regulation (understanding and managing emotions), interpersonal effectiveness (dealing with relationships and acting assertively), and distress tolerance (surviving crises, and accepting yourself for who you are)


Availability of the therapist by phone, e-mail, or other means in between sessions when help is needed.

Several rigorous clinical trials have shown that DBT works. In my own experience, I’ve seen clients improve their lives and relationships, achieve goals they never thought they could achieve, reduce their suffering, and even use what they’ve learned to help others in their lives and in the mental health community.

Aside from DBT, other promising psychological treatments have emerged in recent years, further showing that there is hope for recovery from BPD: mentalization-based therapy (MBT), schema-focused therapy (SFT) and transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP).

Medication also can be helpful for people with BPD (especially mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotic medications, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs). Experts caution, however, that treatment by medication alone, without any psychological treatment or therapy, is not advisable.

The bottom line is that BPD is not a life sentence: Many people recover and sustain their recovery, and effective treatments exist.”