deuteragonists

The 10 Elements of a MAIN CHARACTER

To all the writers who have ever been told “Your characters have to be three dimensional!” or “They should be well-rounded!” and just felt like saying: “What does that even MEAN?! What goes into a 3-dimensional character? Specifically? And how do you go about creating one?!”

Good news. There’s a way. 

Great main characters – heroes, protagonists, deuteragonist, whatever you want to call them – have ten things in common. Ten things that are easily developed, once you know what to create within your character. So no one will ever be able to tell you “needs to be more three dimensional!” ever again. Ha. 

1) Weaknesses: Main characters should be flawed, but I’m not saying this because it will make them more realistic (though it will) – I’m saying they need to be flawed because if they’re not, they shouldn’t be a main character. Story is another word for change, or more accurately, character growth. Not character as in “fictional person”, character meaning “heart and soul”. Story is someone’s character changing, for better or worse. Main characters at the beginning of the story are lacking something vital, some knowledge of themselves, some knowledge of how to live a better life, and this void is ruining their lives. They must overcome these weaknesses, if they’re going to become complete, and reach a happy ending. There are two types of weaknesses: Psychological and Moral. Psychological ones only hurt the main character. Moral ones cause the main character to hurt other people. Easy.  

2) Goal: Characters exist because they want something. Desiring something, and the fight against opposition for that desire, is the lifeblood of story; and because character is story, it’s also desire that can breathe life into words on a page, and begin the process of creating a real person in a reader’s mind. It’s this ‘desire for something’ that sparks that first connection between reader and character. It makes us think “Well, now I have to find out if this person gets what they want.” This is a powerful link. (How many mediocre movies do we suffer through, when we could easily stop watching, because we’re still trapped by that question of “what happens?”) So if this is powerful enough to keep people watching an annoying movie, imagine how powerful it can be in an excellent story. 

Like in Up, the goal is to get the house to Paradise Falls.

3) Want: If the main character wants something, they want it for a darn good reason. Usually, they think that attaining the goal will fill the void they can sense in their lives, the deficiency they can feel, but don’t know how to fix. And they’re almost always wrong. Getting the goal doesn’t help anything; which is why, while pursuing that goal, they discover a deeper need that will heal them. Which brings us to …

4) Need/Elixir: Main characters are missing something, a weakness in their innermost selves is causing them to live a less-than-wonderful life. Through story, these main characters can be healed. Once they discover what’s missing, and accept it, and change the way they live to include this truth they’ve uncovered … they’re healed. Learning this truth, whatever it is, forms the purpose of the story for the main character. The reader, and the character, think the story is about achieving that big tangible goal the premise talks about; really, underneath it all, the story is about someone achieving a big intangible truth, that will ultimately save their life and future. Often, this need is exactly what the character fears or professes to hate. 

Like Finding Nemo, where Dory states exactly what Marlin needs to learn. 

5) Ghosts: 

Not this kind of ghosts.

Ghosts are events in your character’s past which mark the source of their weaknesses and strengths. Because these happened, the character became who they are. All we need to know about backstory are these moments, because who the character became is all we care about. There’s really only one ghost you absolutely need: the source of their moral and psychological weakness. Something happened that knocked the character’s world off kilter, and everything from that moment onward has been tainted by what happened. This moment haunts them (hence the name), and holds them back from uncovering that need that will heal their weaknesses. Pixar are masters of this: the source of Carl being stuck in the past, curmudgeonly, unable of loving anyone new? Ellie dying; his ghost. In Finding Nemo, the source of Marlin being suffocating, protective to the point of being harmful, possessive, and fearful? His wife and 99% of his children being eaten in front of him; his ghost. 

6) True Character: These are the strengths, values, convictions, fears, faults, beliefs, worldview, and outlook on life that make the main character who they truly are. 

7) Characterization: This is everything on the surface of a main character. The way they look, talk, act, etc. All of this originates from those deeper elements of their being, the strengths, values, ghosts, weaknesses, needs, that make them who they truly are. So often, you can think of this as a facade they’re projecting, a way to shield the the truth about themselves, how they wish to be perceived. The story, and the other characters, are slowly going to see deeper than this characterization, revealing more and more of the reasons it is the way it is. 

8) Arc: If the character is going to change from “Incomplete Person” to “Complete Person” there’s going to be a journey they go on to make that possible. The external story, the pursuit of that big tangible goal the premise is about, is causing an inner journey to take place. What they have to do in pursuit of that external goal will apply pressure to those weaknesses, and pressure causes change. This process has seven steps, but if I write it all here this post is going to be obscenely long. So I might wait and give this its own post.

9) Changed Person: Who is the character going to be at the end of this story? They better be different, or else the story didn’t work. How do they show how different they’ve become? What is the moral choice they make, that spins their trajectory from “the future doesn’t look so great” to “happily ever after”? This should be known right away, maybe even before anything else is settled about the character. This gives a distinct end goal, a way to work backwards, a destination in mind that you can navigate towards.  

10) Fascination and Illumination: The surface characterization, and the brief glimpses of the true character underneath create curiosity in the reader/audience. What the character says, and the implied subtext beneath the dialogue, creates a puzzle the audience wants to solve. Actions they take work the same way; if the writer indicates there’s deeper motivation behind why a character behaves in the way they do, we buy into solving that mystery right away. We can’t help it. “Who are you really? Why are you the way you are? And how is that going to effect the story?” These are all the unspoken, almost not consciously acknowledged, questions that fascinating characters provoke. Searching out meaning, connecting the dots to find the truth – we can’t resist this. We’re not fascinated by tons of backstory and exposition about a character; we’re fascinated by story, by mystery, by the technique of withholding information and having to interpret and hunt out the truth on our own.  So gradually, the story and the characters will force that character to reveal a little more, and a little more, until we have a complete picture of who this person is. Crucial that this information isn’t told up front. Gradually illuminate it. It’s just like getting to know a real person. 

So how does this work in a real character? Let’s take a look at Flynn Rider/Eugene Fitzherbert, because almost everybody has seen that movie. 

Moral Weaknesses: He’s selfish. He’s a little greedy. He’s a little rude. He uses his charisma and bravado to keep people at a distance from the real him. 

Psychological Weaknesses: Insecurity, fear of vulnerability, feels like the real him (Eugene) would be unwanted, unlovable, and have nothing – just like when he was an orphaned kid. Also, he doesn’t know who he wants to be, what he wants to live for. 

Goal: Flynn wants to get that crown. So he has to get Blondie to see the floating lights, so she’ll give it back to him, and then they can part ways as unlikely friends.  

Want: Why does he want the crown? What does it mean for him? He actually states it (reluctantly) in song: “I have dreams like you, no really. Just much less touchy feely. They mainly happen somewhere warm and sunny. On an island that I own, tanned and rested and alone. Surrounded by enormous piles of money.” He senses there’s something off in his life, something is missing. But he mistakenly believes this missing piece is money, which will allow him to buy a lonely island, where he can live out his days as Flynn and no one will ever know Eugene. 

Need: “All those days chasing down a daydream. All those years living in a blur. All that time never truly seeing, things the way they were. Now she’s here, shining in the starlight. Now she’s here, suddenly I know. If she’s here, it’s crystal clear, I’m where I’m meant to go.” He wants a crown … he needs to fall in love with Rapunzel. He needs to love something more than himself, and find out that love isn’t something to fear and push away. He needs to abandon the 'Tales of Flynnagin Rider’ ambition, and get a more worthwhile, new dream. 

Ghost: The source of all of his weaknesses can be linked to his “little bit of a downer” childhood as an orphan. Interestingly, he isn’t aware of another facet of that ghost, and Rapunzel points it out to him. “Was he a thief too?” she asks. He looks taken aback, before answering “Uh, no.” Something’s gone wrong. The choices he’s making are not living up to that original role model.  

Characterization: Flynn’s charming, funny, smart, charismatic, and arrogant (in a somehow charming sort of way). He’s also rude, contemptuous, and sarcastic. All traits that help him keep up that 'swashbuckling rogue’ facade, and push people away from the real him. 

True Character: Underneath all that, he’s a Disney prince. That pretty much sums it up.  

Changed Person: “Started going by Eugene again, stopped thieving, and basically turned it all around.” He started the story as the guarded and evasive Flynn, he ends as the selfless and thoroughly-in-love Eugene. 

Fascination and Illumination: Imagine if everything about Flynn had been told, right up front. We know he’s an orphan, we know he’s upheld a fake reputation, we know he’s a kind and loving guy underneath it all, we even know about his “tales of Flynnagin” childhood dream. You know what happens? We like him … but we’re not interested in him. There’s nothing we need to find out. There’s no curiosity. And if there’s no curiosity, and nothing being illuminated, your story’s not going anywhere. So instead, we find out – alongside Rapunzel – more about Flynn as the story progresses. And that is how it should be. 

So!

Developing characters in this way, I’ve found, really reduces worries about how “well-rounded” and three dimensional I’ve made them. They feel real to me. And besides helping me create characters, this ten element technique has also let me analyze characters I like, which is strangely fun. It’s a great way to figure out why a character works, what causes them to be so effective, and how you can go about creating them yourself. 

Yeah, I’m a bit of a nerd. 

But if you want, try it out. Develop a character. Analyze a character. You might find it as useful/fun as I do.

Famous Canonical A-Spec Characters

Monkey D. Luffy, the protagonist of One-Piece, the best-selling manga ever in history.

Originally posted by okami-fr

Jughead Jones, a world-famous character from the classic comic series Archie.

Raphael Santiago, a major character in the popular TV show Shadowhunters.

Originally posted by magnusandalec

Todd Chavez, the deuteragonist of the popular animated cartoon Bojack Horseman.

Originally posted by bojackhorseman

Daryl Dixon, a main character from the popular TV show The Walking Dead.

Originally posted by daryl-dixon-is-life

Daud, the villain protagonist from the popular video game franchise Dishonored.

Originally posted by theoutsidersmark

anonymous asked:

I've seen 3 way of interpreting the color cover: Death (obviously with how the chapter ended), Loss of Virginity (her offer to Kaneki when he's ready and /or considering sex as a way to get him to stay, and flowers used in poems and literature as a symbol of a young woman's virginity, lastly (and least likely to me) pregnancy (flowers also meaning new life, the red either meaning loss virginity or childbirth going along with Touka offer of sex resulting in a One Eyed Prince/Princess)

do u think this chapter is a death flag for touka?

do you think the blood splatter on the colour page might be hinting that mutsuki might stab touka with one of her knives or something?

Idk if anyone asked this before, but there’s been death flags already marked on touka from the latest chapter and I just want to know you’re opinion and what you think. Considering how the chapter ended, I’m really worried and concerned for her.

Hi! So according to the colored page of latest chapter. I guess you’ve seen the 3 possibilities of what might happen to Touka. I would like to hear what you think about it. I highly doubt that she would die, Ishida sensei doesn’t kill characters lightly especially if it doesn’t serve the story (which I think is applied on Touka right now). Also her expression in the picture doesn’t imply bad thing happening, but more like she’s happy? I mean even if she were to die I don’t think it will be now..

Or pregnancy.

Dude the stain on toukas stomach kinda looks like a ukaku kagune. What if the color page is implying pregnancy?

rebeccastarlight: The blood splatter on the cover page it also looks like she’s going to die from childbirth

I wasn’t really a believer of the cover page implying that Touka became pregnant, but I recently saw a reddit post about it. [You can probably find it on the front page.] So anyways, it talked about the poem Ishida made a year ago, “Her womb smelled like it was burnt”. Bad sign already, but if you go through the translated lyrics its even worse. It also straightforwardly says the children meant to be born, had died. Do you think that relates to whats happening now? ItAlsoWouldLeadToParallelling 

Wow, this is a really popular question, huh? Well, really it’s two and a half questions: 1) Will Touka die next chapter? 2) Will Touka get pregnant? 2.5) Will it end tragically? But since they’re all related to the cover picture, I’ll answer them all here before saying what I think is going to happen.

Q: Will Touka die next chapter?

A: No way Jose. If I’ve learnt anything from all that I’ve ever read, watched or played, it’s that female deuteragonists are IMMORTAL. Even more so than protagonists on some occasions. Don’t worry about the death flags, because this arc will be a parallel of the original Anteiku Raid arc, and you know who had a ton of death flags back then and who Touka has been paralleling since the start of :re? Old man Yoshimura! Who, despite it all, is still alive (if not kickin’). Touka won’t die - it’s far more likely that she’s going to get captured like her predecessor, probably as bait for Kaneki. 

Q: Will Touka get pregnant, and will it end in tragedy?

A: Unlikely. That would require a 9-month timeskip to pay off, and things are way too hectic in the story right now to allow for something like that. The alternative would be that it’s foreshadowing for the epilogue, but it seems a bit strange to do that so early on and before Kaneki and Touka have even done the deed. It’s also not something that really needs to be foreshadowed because it would be part of the denouement rather than the actual plot. I don’t think it’s ukaku kagune since Ishida always draws blood with artistic flair in his colour art, and the drops over her breasts are unmistakably blood. As for the flowers, those are Kaneki’s signature flower, sweet olives, and they represent him.

Where the stillbirth/death in childbirth theories are concerned, I really doubt Ishida would kill off Touka so needlessly in the story’s epilogue of all places, and killing the baby would be equally pointless as we’ve seen Kuzen and Ukina (moar parallels) manage it. As one of these anons has already said, Ishida always has a point to his tragedy; he wouldn’t just throw either of those things in at the story’s conclusion for the sake of squeezing our tear ducts, especially since it would have nothing to do with the plotline of Tokyo Ghoul and, again, an epilogue is supposed to unwind tension rather than wrack it up.

What I think is going to happen

I think the blood on her stomach is indicative of a wound inflicted by Mutsuki. But it’s not just going to be any wound that’ll regenerate in a week - I think that out of jealousy, Mutsuki is going to damage Touka’s womb beyond repair. Since Ghouls have high-speed regenerative abilities, the only way to ensure that the womb won’t grow back would be to tear it out of her body, or maybe even eat it (we’ve already seen Mutsuki feed from bodies, and it could serve to parallel Ayato eating her kakuhou in the original series). Sexual mutilation would fit Mutsuki’s parallels with Torso and Nutcracker, and Kaneki and Touka talking about sex foreshadows that specific calamity more than a general death - especially since we’ve seen how good Touka is with kids in Ch 120. It also allows the aforementioned poem to fit in -  “The children who were meant to be born, died” - referring to Touka’s ability to reproduce being robbed from her. 

So I think sad times are ahead for Touka, but she will live on. And isn’t Hinami kind of her and Kaneki’s kid already?

I see a lot of people who cannot understand the difference between Antagonist and Anti-hero in BnHA

Anti-hero: a central character in a story, movie, or drama who lacks conventional heroic attributes.

Antagonist: a character whose evil actions or motives are important to the plot. (Note: Villains must be evil).

Bakugou is an Anti-hero and deuteragonist of the story, he’s not an antagonist, that’s the villains roles.

However, Stain is an anti-villain, the complete opposite of anti-hero. A villain with heroic goals, personality traits, and/or virtues. Their desired ends are mostly good, but their means of getting there are evil.

concept: disney princess story but instead of it being a male love interest or deuteragonist who teaches the naive, idealistic princess the ways of the world, it is…a lady…

Look. I understand that the 616 stony fandom is all about pining!Tony, and that’s all good. I only know the MCU, though, and that’s different. In the MCU, pining!Steve is the real. Not only does Tony have a serious girlfriend who he really loves while Steve is pretty much defined by his loneliness, but the movies #confirm it. Consider:

  • Iron Man 1: no mention of Captain America
  • Iron Man 2: Tony has half of a replica Cap shield but it’s made clear he doesn’t think much of it.
  • Iron Man 3: even after meeting Steve, he isn’t mentioned at all in Tony’s movie. Tony is more interested in Pepper.
Meanwhile take a ding dang look at the Captain America movies:
  • The First Avenger: Tony isn’t born yet but Steve spends considerable time with Tony’s sperm donor.
  • The Winter Soldier: Tony is specifically mentioned like a dozen times and there’s some foreshadowing about a future conflict with (oh guess who it’s) TONY.
  • Civil War: Tony is. Literally? There. He’s the deuteragonist. The PRIMARY conflict is Steve dealing with the issues he has regarding his friendship with TONY STARK.
Like even if we take into account the fact that Tony IS the center of the MCU. The Thor movies do not focus on Tony this way. Incredible Hulk only had him as a cameo. Tony is a HUGE part of Steve’s story. SPECIFICALLY.
So anyway. That’s why I love pining!Steve.

OH MY GOSH GUYS I JUST READ THIS AND WHY ISN’T EVERYONE TALKING ABOUT IT

Imagine, if you will: 

A boarding school for children who went to magical worlds like Narnia and Wonderland…and came back and now have to adjust to being stuck in the Real World again. Ever wonder what Alice, Dorothy, and the Pevensie kids went through afterwards? It was probably something like this.

The main character, Nancy, is openly asexual. RED ALERT RED ALERT AN ACTUAL FANTASY BOOK BY AN ACCLAIMED AUTHOR WITH A CANONICAL ASEXUAL HEROINE WHOSE ASEXUALITY IS OPENLY DISCUSSED BUT IS NOT CENTRAL TO HER PLOTLINE! THIS IS NOT A DRILL!

The deuteragonist is a trans boy*. His name is Kade; he’s really cool. (He’s a former Goblin Prince-in-Waiting, I want his story so much, come on Seanan McGuire give us a prequel about him). 

There’s also a creepy murder mystery because why the heck not. 

Basically, it’s everything I ever wanted in a book. And did I mention actual asexual representation…I swear, if I’d had this book as a teenager, my life would have been so different. 

And the author is demi/bisexual. 

(The kindle book is like $2.99 over at Amazon right now, if you want to go check it out.)

*(Trigger warning for some transphobist comments made by one character that are refuted by literally everyone else)

“Why hasn't Bakugou apologized to Midoriya? Does Horikoshi condone bullying?”
  • Because it would make no sense whatsoever at this point in the story.
  • If the narrative is anything to go by then no, he doesn’t.

We are at the point where Bakugou recently revealed that he used to bully Midoriya because he’s always found his presence genuinely distressing. In other words, he had a reason for being a bully specifically to Midoriya. Was he in the right? Of course not. He handled his emotions in the worst possible way by violently taking them out on Midoriya. There’s no justifying that.

The thing is, Midoriya (and apparently some readers) had been unaware up until that fight that Bakugou wasn’t just being a shit for the sake of being a shit. He had a reason, and that’s important to understand because it means Bakugou himself used to see his own actions as perfectly justifiable. He felt threatened by Midoriya so he went for him before Midoriya could get to him. The fact that Midoriya was just trying to be his friend and had no intention of hurting him in any way is irrelevant in understanding Bakugou’s take on their childhood relationship. The point is that these two seriously didn’t (and still don’t) understand each other.

At.

All.

It’s only after this fight and their talk with All Might that they start a new chapter in their relationship in 121.

Meaning it’s been less than 10 chapters since they became true rivals. They are still far from really understanding each other, so Bakugou abruptly apologizing at this point where he still doesn’t understand exactly when and how and why he messed up would be completely out of character and just plain terrible writing. He still has a long way to go which is sort of the whole point of a coming-of-age story like this.

As for Bakugou not being punished for his behavior: the narrative has been consistently punishing him since the beginning. He’s taken hostage, Deku follows him to UA and then beats him, he doesn’t get his fight with Todoroki, winning the sports festival ends up enraging instead of satisfying him, his televised temper tantrum gets him kidnapped by villains, he blames himself for All Might, his behavior yet again results in failure for him at the license exam which is why he not only doesn’t get an internship but has to put in extra work beside school just to get on the same level as the rest of his class. At no point is Bakugou rewarded for his appalling behavior. Quite the opposite, really: bad things keep happening to him because of his “villainous” attitude, and this being a shounen manga, he will be forced to change his ways in order to become a pro-hero and keep his place as the deuteragonist of the story.

anonymous asked:

If Katara had married Zuko she would've had a loving caring husband who would've treated her like a queen and would've treated their kids equally plus Katara would've been an ambassador in the Fire Nation and then Fire Lady, she would've had a huge political role and she would've used blood bending in so many good ways, she would've gotten a statue that she deserved so much, all this would've happened if she had married Zuko, but she didn't and I feel so so bad for her, it makes me so sad.

I don’t disagree with a single thing here, but I do want to address a misunderstanding that is likely to occur when non-shippers see this argument: the idea that Katara marrying Zuko would be a panacea for all the things that went wrong with her character in the post-A:TLA material.

Out of context, “Katara marrying Zuko would have made everything better” is only another way of Katara’s destiny hinging on who she is paired with romantically. So let’s talk for a moment about what we actually mean when we use that as a catch-all phrase for A:TLA’s improvement:

A return to the themes and symbolism that A:TLA espoused. As I explain here, a lot of the themes of A:TLA were subverted in order to make the canon pairings happen. If the creators didn’t force a romantic pairing between Aαng and Katara, her character would have been better served because motifs such as “choosing one’s own destiny” would have played out naturally through her development arc.

More creative control by A:TLA’s best writers. Bryke had no writing credits to their name prior to A:TLA, and a lot of the best writing work on the series was done by Aaron and Elizabeth Ehasz. These two had a special focus on Zuko, but they refused to succumb to the temptation of making Zuko the guy who just “gets” everything in the end because he’s the hero. Unlike Bryke’s favorite character, which leads nicely into …

The series would not have played favorites with Aαng. This is a major part of what annoys people with the A:TLA finale, and leads to further problems in Legend of Korra. Aαng is not allowed to go through the same soul-wrenching struggles as the rest of the characters. It’s not that he doesn’t suffer, or he doesn’t lose people, or that he isn’t conflicted. It’s that his core beliefs are never challenged in a way that makes them develop. In the show, it is reality that always bends to Aαng’s beliefs, instead of Aαng having to adapt his beliefs to reality. If you go back through A:TLA and compile a montage of all the times other people learn that Aαng was right and they were wrong, you would a) understand what I mean, and b) understand how damaging that is for a protagonist, the person you want in your show to change the most

Katara’s agency as a character. It’s safe to say that Aαng, in the context of romance, is detrimental to Katara’s agency as a character. We see this when side characters repeatedly encourage Aαng to pursue Katara “because you’re the Avatar”, even though they have never met Katara and have no idea what her opinion is on this romance thing, if she even has one. We see this again when Aαng kisses Katara without her consent and never apologizes for it or brings it up again. And we see it in the comics, where Katara’s ideals are Aαng’s ideals, they never have any conflicts, her feeling abandoned by him is portrayed as wrong, but her approval of Aαng’s potential murder of Zuko is right, her leaving it up to Aαng to decide whether the Four Nations should be forcibly separated is portrayed as right, and her old Water Tribe friends accuse her of having forgotten her homeland because she spends all her time with her boyfriend.        

Avoidance of black and white morality. One of A:TLA’s strengths as a show is that it portrays a complex world. There are lessons to be learned and characters with strong moral convictions, but there is rarely a sense of one set of principles being lauded over all the others. In fact, a sense of moral superiority without listening to other points of view, such as the Fire Nation has, proves to be highly destructive to the world at large. 

But when it comes to Kαtααng, this complexity falls by the wayside. Zuko the morally ambiguous deuteragonist is suddenly the “bad boy” who “doesn’t really care about [Katara]”, despite the fact that he risked his life for her in the finale. Arguably the most complex episode of the series, “The Southern Raiders”, is seen by Bryke (who did not write it) in purely good-vs-evil terms, with Aαng being the “angel” and Zuko being the “devil” on Katara’s shoulders, respectively. Oversimplification of morality is something that plagues Legend of Korra to a major extent, with the embodiment of that being “goodness” and “badness” personified in Vaatu and Raava during Book 2. (Notice, too, that Katara in LOK had bloodbending outlawed, instead of her embarking on a similar journey to Zuko in “The Firebending Masters”, where even seemingly destructive bending could be used to create life.) Black and white morality in LOK has its beginnings in the tail end of A:TLA, with the boy who could not be allowed to kill under any circumstances, and who is, quite literally, a Nice Guy.

Sokka: The number one mistake nice guys like you make: being too nice.

So, to translate: “all this would’ve happened if she had married Zuko” = “there is a natural narrative thread that would have culminated in Katara having a relationship with Zuko if it weren’t for the executive producers derailing it, and her character, for the sake of their own pet character who was in many ways a self-insert for them both.”

Tada!

anonymous asked:

I keep seeing theories that touka is going to die in the upcoming arc or that she has alot of deathflags from the recent chapters. And I am starting to get worried I mean I don't think ishida would bring her back as a main character only to kill her off. what do you think.

Deathflags crystal methflags. Yoshimura had flags sticking out of his eyeballs in the original Anteiku Raid arc and he’s still alive. Yomo had them in the Cochlea Arc, Takizawa had them in the Siege Arc. All daijoubu. Touka has the additional asset of being a female deuteragonist and lemme tell you, that kind of character is incredibly resistant to death. They have a better survival record than male protagonists. I know ‘cuz they’re usually my favourites and it affords me a smug grin when friends complain about how their faves always die. 

She’s going to be…well, not fine, but she’s going to live. Their reasoning rests on the belief that the series is a tragedy because of Kaneki’s closing monologue in the first chapter of the original series. Since Touka makes Kaneki happy, for a tragic end she has to be removed. Imo, they’re half-right: Tokyo Ghoul, the original series, was, indeed, a tragedy. But :re is a different series altogether, and its opening narration explicitly states that it occurs next to the tragedy, i.e. after it - not during it.

The multifaceted title :re suggests both the coffee shop and the birth of a king, but it also indicates a second chance, like a replay or a rewind. :re is Kaneki being given the chance to escape his tragedy by the author by transplanting him into a story of a different genre. He constantly teeters on the edge of tragedy, but I firmly believe he will break away from it - otherwise why would Ishida have brought Kaneki back to life in the first place?

Props to Matthew Moy!

What an incredible performance as Lars Barriga in the Wanted event. Four episodes of really stellar delivery. We were all impressed with his acting in The New Lars as Steven in Lars’ body, but The Good Lars was a different look at a subtle, significant side of Lars we hadn’t seen before, and the episodes Stuck Together, The Trial, Off Colors and Lars’ Head kicked off Season 5 with a bang. Honestly, VAs have to bring so much to the table and their performances are so crucial to the development of a character, and we’re lucky that Matthew Moy gave it his all to make sure that the principal deuteragonist of the event got his fair due. I’m impressed, and very thankful.

Why do I dislike Tales of Zestiria the X?

Recently I’ve been asked one question numerous times: “Why do you think the anime is shit? You only hate it because it doesn’t focus on SorMik, right?”

Now guys, I think it’s vital for me to answer this. Because let’s face it, we will never see face to face if we don’t discuss the matter. And look, here I am, typing this out because I feel this is important. So if you’re curious and want to understand why a lot of us dislike the anime then please bear with me because this will be long (6 pages in Word, 6!)

To make this a little bit easier for me, I’ll assume that you haven’t played the game or watched its walkthrough yet and that you like the anime. But of course if you did either of them it’s good, bc at least you’ll know what I am talking about.

And so, I shall do a character analysis in this post, comparing the game and anime selves to each other while I name some other issues as well. I won’t list all the inconsistency and plot holes the anime has for I’d be here even after my death.

I’m going to try to make you guys understand that while the SorMik fandom is not happy, there are more pressing issues with the anime than that.

Keep reading

I am thrilled to finally be able to reveal the main cast of Studio Élan’s upcoming visual novel!

From left to right:

Tara: Everyone’s favorite paranormal internet celebrity, Tara Markovsky is THE authority on ghosts, ghouls and everything in between. Her desire to write a book about the most fascinating of legends brings her and Maddie to the snowy village where our tale begins.

Maddie: Our hero! Being your best friend’s manager is never easy, especially when said best friend drags you along on a search for ancient legends. However, it’s not long before she finds herself captivated by something in the village much more fascinating than any legend.

Morgan: A native to the mysterious village our heroes find themselves in, she invited her favorite occult celebrity to come solve an ancient mystery deep in the forest that surrounds her town.

Abigail: Our deuteragonist! A mysterious girl shrouded in arcane secrets. Who is she, really? What does she know about the darkness that lurks in the woods?

Only one way to find out: play for yourself!

Follow @studio-elan and https://twitter.com/vnstudioelan for constant updates on the project! We can’t wait to share our wonderful romance with all of you!

The Legend of Heroes: Trails Series - Localization Blog #2

Hi, kids!

This is Brittany, Localization Producer at XSEED, editor/graphic text monkey/what-have-you for Trails in the Sky the 3rd, and current head for the Trails series in general. I’m very eager to write this blog, because it’ll be full of updates for FC, SC, and the 3rd.

Let’s get the 3rd’s status out of the way: schedule-wise, we’re currently doing great! When we announced this game last year, I was dead set on getting it out by spring 2017, so I’m very proud to say that goal is being met. Trails in the Sky the 3rd is coming to PC in English on…a date you’ll find out very, very soon.

Barring typos or odd QA hiccups (which can happen when “smashing” PSP and PC code together to get the best of both worlds), the game is in pretty good shape and we’re right where we need to be. It’s cleaning up very well.

               | QA is a sexy time and I won’t let you take it away from me.

I’d like to start by properly warning Trails newbies first: please play Trails in the Sky’s first and second chapters before playing the 3rd. Heck, please play them before even reading this blog! Although the 3rd is not a “third chapter” since the Estelle and Liberl’s story wrapped up with SC, this story still relies on knowledge gained by playing those two games. Internally, I’ve said before that the 3rd has only one target audience: people who’ve played both Trails FC and SC. Cold Steel fans will understand some of the lore dumping, but other details will be quite lost on lost you. Though, hey, if you want to purchase it anyway and help support my coffee fund, I ain’t gonna stop you. (Please buy it and play it later. I’m desperate, here.)

Keep reading

1-Minute Anime Reviews

This season is fantasy, fantasy…and more FANTASY~!

So what did I pick up this season? A whole lot of strange, mixed things.

Shingeki no Bahamut: Genesis (S1) & Virgin Soul (S2)

Genre: action, fantasy
Summary:  A bunch of angels and demons who try to wake up the destructive Dragon Bahamut, versus a bunch of angels and demons who try to stop said dragon from waking up…and in between them, a couple of eccentric bounty-hunters caught up in the middle of the mess. Gets even messier in S2 with a girl who turns into a dragon whenever she sees a hot guy. Fun times.
Story: B/B+
Characters: B+
Overall: B+/A-
Commentary: By the same studio that animated Yuri on Ice, except with far better budget/management because the animation for this show is generally pretty easy on the eyes from beginning to end. First season is over, and second season is currently airing; and I gotta say, while the series doesn’t bring much new to the table in terms of plot or premise, it is insanely fun and well-balanced. This is not only a show that’s done great, it’s also the kind of show that can be recommended to just about anyone. Based on a mobile game, but is surprisingly a really good standalone adaptation. Pure entertainment.

Zero Kara Hajimeru Mahou

Genre: fantasy
Summary: A hermit loli-witch leaves her cave to find her stolen spell book and runs into a witch-hating tiger-man who wants to become human. They form a contract in which he protects her until she retrieves her grimoire, and in return she’ll transform him into a human once the goal is fulfilled. 
Story: C
Characters: C+
Overall: C+
Commentary: I’m not really sure why they made an anime of this, it’s not only predictable, but also really mediocre in terms of…well, everything? But I guess the furry is kinda cute. There’s often a lapse in logic but at the very least, it’s a moderate show, so you won’t pop a vein watching it. 

Rokudenashi Mahou Koushi to Akashic Records

Genre: action, fantasy
Summary: A subpar spell caster / lazy mooch is forced to teach at a Magic Academy on his master’s order. Not only does he lose to his student in a spell fight, he’s flippant, doesn’t take bets seriously, and begrudges having to work. However, he may secretly be more talented than he lets on…
Story: C+
Characters: C+ 
Overall: C+/B-
Commentary: There were one or two entertaining moments, I have to admit; after all, the protagonist is a sly, underhanded charlatan… but the best way to describe this series is that…it feels distinctly like it belongs in the late 90s, early 2000s; a very generic anime from that particular era. That’s the kind of feeling it gives off. It’s not amazing, just barely passable. This is definitely more of a particular crowd’s kind of show (what with the sexy garters on lolis—).

KADO: The Wrong Right Answer

Genre: sci-fi, drama
Summary: A formless being from another dimension coined the Anisotrophic descends upon earth, dons on the skin of man, and offers to mankind the keys for transcending their mortal limitations. The world is at a crossroad. To rapidly advance or not? May the discussions begin.
Story: 🔥  <-fire I ate.
Characters: 🔥 🔥  <-fire burning my stomach lining.
Overall: 🔥 🔥 🔥  <-still on fire and internally screaming.
Commentary: You might have already seen my earlier review on KADO, but I essentially love/hate this show because I was led to think it was going to be a show about clever negotiations but ultimately ended with a fist fight. And while I still might recommend it just for all its obscurities, because it IS different, and could be a source of inspiration to some—I suggest viewers watch it with, not a grain, but two fist-fulls of salt and be prepared to get frustrated at some point. 

Oshitsu Kyoushi Haine

Genre: slice of life
Summary: In a fictional, Victorian-esque setting, one tiny but supremely talented tutor is summoned to the royal palace in order to groom and raise four troublesome princes into proper candidates for the throne.
Story: C+
Characters: C+
Overall: C+/B-
Commentary: Not a very creative or inspiring series, but generally relaxing, mildly entertaining and appealing enough to be a decent time-passer. Admittedly, it’s more of a visual guilt pleasure geared towards a female audience than much else. I’m kind of amused though, that super newbie seiyuus (minus Aoi) are the main cast and the more famous ones play support XD…

Yu-Gi-Oh! VRAINS

Genre: card games, shounen
Summary: An aloof guy (with outrageous hair) who tries hard not to stand out in a crowd in real life (are you serious?), while in virtual reality he is secretly a powerful duelist known as Playmaker. Playmaker logs onto the duel server to fight against a renegade group of duelist called the Knights of Hanoi, who are also after him because he harbors the snarky A.I. Ignis in his duel disk. Chasing after them seem to be one of Yusaku’s 3 goals…much like his 3 reasoning for everything.
Story: IDK what I even say about this, it’s typical young-shounen?
Characters: ’_’) the usual archetypes thus far with not much variation.
Commentary: I actually had to drop the show quite recently because it was just going nowhere fast (yell at me if it magically somehow becomes amazing later on) — Anyway, I gave it a good shot. I really, really liked Ignis (the only deuteragonist I actually do like? Bonus points for being voiced by Sakurai), but pretty much disliked everything else. Although to be honest, I had already disliked this show from the early concepts. It was the first time I saw the previews/trailer for a new YGO series and knew I wouldn’t like it from the get-go. Yusaku is exactly the sort of typical protagonist I’d find in an Isekai novel (most of whom, get on my nerves); and even then by comparison, he’s one of the least interesting and more awkward of the bunch. Moreover, I have watched, very literally…every single Shounen anime within the last couple of decades and this show is among the most cringy of its kind (kimoi is the word that’s in my head). I’ve never dropped a TCG show nearly as fast as this one. If I were to keep watching, it might just barely be for the TCG. (I also can’t stop chortling at the name Knights of Hanoi, I keep picturing Vietnam…And what’s with all these chuunibyou, goosebump-inducing names…)

The only good thing to come out of this is now my friend who likes Vrains can’t poke fun at me for liking certain kids shows.

Uchouten Kazoku S2

Genre: slice of (tanuki) life, fantasy
Overall: A-
Commentary: This series is already moderately famous so I won’t get too deep into it, but Uchouten 2 is just as lovely as Uchouten 1. This show is hands down my absolute favourite of the season. It’s strange, wacky, exciting, and very close to home sometimes. The themes are solid, the narrative strong, and the characters absolutely charming. It’s an overall magical account about family and personal nature, and I highly recommend it.

Re:Creators

Genre: action, fantasy, drama
Summary: What happens when your novel creations come to life and try to confront you, the creator, as well as all of humanity? Are we also a creation of someone else? Things get a little strange and analytical in RE:Creators.
Story: B+
Characters: B+ 
Overall: B+ (thus far)
Commentary: This is an on-going show. I’m not sure how it’s going to play out in the end but so far I’m enjoying it quite a bit. They sometimes run a little too long on expositions; which to me is totally fine, because it’s the good kind of exposition—like a second wave of Log Horizon.
I came into this show expecting it to be some sort of terrible adaptation of a light novel (because the title name, seriously) but pleasantly wound up with not only an anime-original (with concepts from the creator of Black Lagoon!), but also a very serious tone for such a whimsical premise. The characters have notable depth to them and engage in a fair amount of discussions with substance…they express the kind of opinions that are so well-aligned with their nature, it gives off the sensation that they’ve broken away from being mere puppets of the script. For me, it’s always deeply interesting when characters can express themselves and act/react accordingly with an agreeable sense of logic (—in other words…my god, another rare show where characters can actually think for themselves—and this was not meant to be ironic).

Quick literary note:

Rey = protagonist
Finn = deuteragonist
Kylo Ren = antagonist
Poe = tritagonist

I hate getting all English professor unless people ask me to, but these are pretty clear-cut, at least as far as the story currently stands.

Text vs Subtext, the invisible struggle

Have you ever felt like the text in Sherlock is telling you one thing while the subtext is telling you the exact opposite?

Because that’s the impression I keep having since Season 4.

If we focus only on The Final Problem alone, we keep hitting this wall and the ending brings the conflict to its paroxysm.

“Who you really are, it doesn’t matter. It’s all about the legends, the stories, the adventures.”

These final words from our Mary-narrator drove us mad. No, who you are does matter, Moffat told us for years this was a show about a detective and not a detective show. This is a complete turnabout, what happened to the story we love?

And yet that’s what the text tells us but the subtext? The subtext is telling a very different story:

Play you, Eurus said, but when did Sherlock play Sherlock Holmes? Only at the very end, when Sherlock finally gets what Eurus wanted.

This melody doesn’t come from nowhere, it’s what Eurus was playing while Sherlock was about to meet her. It was the very first notes we heard, the melody she repeats when he finally sees her.

Such beautiful music, Sherlock said to the guards, Eurus said it was right. Maybe it’s both but they can grasp only one aspect separately.

When Eurus gave him the violin and asked him to play ‘you,’ what she meant was: I’ve given you the melody and the instrument, this is you, play it now. Sadly Sherlock didn’t understand that she had already given him the answer. It’s only at the end he does, only when both participants, Sherlock and Eurus, two sides of him, are working in unison that the melody is complete.

The melody is Sherlock Holmes, this is a duet, finally this is ‘Who you really are’. Sherlock has integrated what Eurus is, she is his emotions and he’s accepted his identity, completely.

At the same time Mary is telling us that who Sherlock and John really are doesn’t matter, the music is screaming the exact opposite.

Yes, Mary has taken over the narrative, she’s telling us what we’re supposed to think now but the subtext?

The subtext is resisting.

Mary is telling us what John and Sherlock are is irrelevant but the part she’s trying to repress, Sherlock’s emotional side, Eurus, is having none of it.

In fact, whenever you add Eurus in the equation, she thwarts the narrative’s plans, Mary’s plans every time:

  • The Six Thatchers could be called: the story in which John is a side character. Mary takes John’s place as Sherlock’s sidekick, she intrudes in the first half and completely manages to make the whole second half revolve around her. The one moment John finally manages to be somehow relevant, where John isn’t passive is when he interacts with E.
  • Oh yes, Mary’s brillant plan… we could say it worked, mostly. She’s commented everything John was doing, she’s told Sherlock what to do. John is just playing his part, whether he is aware of it or not. Mary told Sherlock to ‘save John Watson’, he isn’t the deuteragonist really, he has become the real case. But for all her brillant plan and omnipresence in the episode, Mary didn’t quite manage to have the last word. Sherlock and John have their catharctic moment because there was a woman on the bus. E is the real reason they manage to fix everything. It’s not Mary’s super difficult case and John saving Sherlock, it’s John confessing his guilt that saved him. E is the last straw that pushed him to finally cry and heal. And then Eurus shot him, she didn’t let Mary’s presence be the last thing on our mind.
  • The Final Problem, Mary is talking and with Sherlock she’s giving her narrative the middle finger by playing the exact opposite.

“Because I know who you really are. A junkie who solves crimes and the doctor who never came home from the war.”

No, Sherlock isn’t just a junkie and John told Mary he’s not the man she thought he was, both in TST and TLD. Saying she does doesn’t make it true and the subtext keeps saying us we’re right and she’s wrong.

Text vs Subtext, both should be working in harmony and we’ve got them against each others.