designer skills

I dont like it but we shouldnt let it ruin her character

She’s not the first underage character to be fan serviced 

remember this

and this

but it didnt ruin their character for us so lets not let this ruin sarada’s personality for the way she’s portrayed. She still kicked major butt in the manga despite the unpractical ninja attire

personally i like this outfit because its more practical and its boyish but still feminine

but her new design in the anime is not as bad as the manga

I still dont like it mainly because i liked the tomboyish look better but theirs nothing we can do about it but support her character and hope she gets a more age appropiate design 

Though, you arent what you wear, sarada is still a strong ninja. I may cringe when i see her new design but her skills are too great to only focus on what she wears though this is my other fav outfit of hers

today i’ve realized that the only thing holding me back from doing whatever the heck i want are my insecurities. i can’t pick my course for college because i feel like i am not good enough to actually become something. i want to be an architect but im afraid my drawing skills and designs will never be enough to sustain me in the future. i want to be a doctor but im scared of failing my subjects because im not actually that good in memorizing terms. i also want to be a lawyer but i feel like i have a weak heart and i will never win my cases in the future. i want to be so many things, i can be one of those things, heck i can be all of those things!!! but these thoughts are driving me crazy!!!!

*Logs on to tumblr
*Throws an attempt at a Taako design at the internet.
*Shrugs and runs away

Art blog

Half cosplay, half my rad photoshop skillz

(Amelia, the Burrowing Owl Siren from @emo-rock-tale)

2

The magnificent @numinlavellan also drew some hilarious sketches for me that I wanted to share! I highly recommend commissioning her - she’s amazing! <3

My challenge of redesigning all characters from Eldarya, part 2! Decided to go with a simpler colo this time. [part 1: nevra, ezarel, valkyon]

Miiko
I have so many problems with Miiko’s character and design I HAD to change this much. Made her younger (she’s a teen here) and completely desexualized her outfit. Fixed the color pattern of her hair/fur (cause the original design makes no sense on that) and cut her hair cause it’s cute and there’s in no (ZERO) girl with short hair in this game which is A SHAME. Also made her look actually asian (her specie, kitsune, comes from the japanese folklore after all) compared to how white she is in game.

Alajéa
I don’t really mind Alajéa’s boob window but made it less terrible. What really bother me tho, when a mermaid becomes human or get legs for whatever reason, is when they wear PANTS. I can’t help to think how unnatural and uncomfortable it must be for them, so I gave her a skirt instead. Made her chubby cause that’s how I see her and the scales more apparent.

Ykhar
Nothing changed much. Her clothes are just simpler and I wanted her hair to be messy. Either because she doesn’t have the time to care about it or it’s just how her hair is and she can’t do anything about it no matter how much she tries. Not sure which I like better!

Some Awesome Female Avant-Garde Artists

Now I have always been a very big fan of unconventional art movements. Not only do I appreciate how those art movements have influenced what we see today, but the history that prompted them is rather revolutionary. Today, I want to appreciate the women who aren’t as well-known as the great Frida Kahlo. This post is more focused in the late 1910’s, to the 1930’s period. It is to honour some of the out-of-the-box women that I admire so much, from all sorts of movements. Here we go!

Helen Lundeberg (1908–1999)

Not just a formally taught and talented artist, but Lundeberg was actually one of the founders of what would be known as the Post-Surrealism art movement, later leaning to abstraction in the 1950’s. She was not only talented, but extremely intelligent, earning a place at Stanford University for “brilliant children.” Now while I said I would focus on the lesser-known artists, Lundeberg is a rather more famous one. However she is a tough one to leave out. She was especially famous during the 1930’s. She was in charge to create multiple murals, and her exhibitions (including her early solo exhibits) were very successful. It’s interesting to see her works evolve during her life, yet remain distinctly recognizable as hers.

Above: Portrait of Inez, 1933, by Helen Lundeberg (1908–1999).

Sophie Taeuber-Arp (1889-1943)

Certainly a woman ahead of her time, Sophie Taeuber-Arp’s artwork as a painter, sculptor, textile designer, furniture, interior designer, architect and dancer all scream “modern woman.” She studied different art forms, primarily textile art, formally in some areas. She was quite heavy in the Dada scene, yet her Constructivist works are probably her most recognizable. Her use of colours of her geometric forms are what draw the eye. Taeuber-Arp’s talent and hard work earned her a position teaching weaving and other textile arts at the Zürich Kunstgewerbeschule (Zürich University of the Arts). She was a woman that appreciated art in all its forms, and many appreciated the way she presented them. In fact, her flexibility and talent is appreciated today, as she is, in fact, the only woman on the current series of Swiss banknotes in Switzerland.

Above: Oval Composition with Abstract Motifs, 1922, by Sophie Taeuber-Arp (1889-1943).

Marguerite Zorach (1887-1968)

Another intelligent artistic lady on the list, Marguerite Zorach became interested in art at a very young age. She, luckily, was blessed with very supportive parents that encouraged her to study everything related with liberal arts. People generally don’t get as unconventional as Zorach really was. Influenced by friends such as Picasso and Matisse, she is naturally recognized for her Fauvist work. Even her husband commented “I just couldn’t understand why such a nice girl would paint such wild pictures.” It may sound like he didn’t approve, but her husband (William Zorach) loved the way she stood out from a crowd. While she settled her “wild” painting side and became more focused on her family, she was titled president to the New York Society of Women Artists. Throughout her life Zorach experimented in all kinds of art media - even making clothes. You can certainly tell the different influences and evolution of her works. Because of this she received mixed criticism throughout her artistic years, yet her works are remembered today.

Above: Death of a Miner, 1930, by Marguerite Zorach (1887-1968).

Pan Yuliang (1899-1977)

Truly a woman to differ from the mainstream (and possibly my favourite on this list). Pan Yuliang is considered China’s “first woman in the country to paint in the Western style.” Unlike many of the woman included in this list, Yuliang did not come from a family of prominence. Just at the age of 14, she was sold by her uncle to a brothel and forced into prostitution. In an amazing turn of events, however, she was noticed by a kind wealthy man who brought her freedom. Becoming his second wife and adopting his last name, he sponsored her education and allowed her artistic abilities to flourish. Because of her talent, fast learning, and hard work, she was accepted in not only the Shanghai Art School, but also numerous schools in Europe. This even included Italy’s Roman Royal Art Academy. Pan Yuliang wasn’t particularly loved by all in China, however. Her works caused some outrage in her home country, and she eventually settled in France, where her paintings were more appreciated.

Above: Detail of Self-portrait, 1936, by Pan Yuliang (1899-1977).

Aleksandra Ekster (1882-1949)

Another abstract woman to appreciate, Russian painter Aleksandra Ekster uniquely used her skills for design purposes. Because of her extraordinary designs, she was required to work in numerous fabulous cities, from places in her home country of Russia, to the romantic Paris, France. Thanks to her prominent and wealthy family, Ekster was free to study art formally, later graduating from Kiev Art School. Her life was the ultimate art fantasy, as she organised meetings at her studio for Russia’s “intellectual elite.” This included artists, writers, and poets. While she never stuck with just one movement, but varied in many revolutionary avant-garde art movements of her time, her style is completely unique and consistent. She is known distinctly for her fashion designs, which were not only completely wearable, but also very memorable.

Above: Costume design for Romeo and Juliette, 1921, by Aleksandra Ekster (1882-1949).

Putting out a call for someone with visual media / graphic design skills, an interest in conservation. Looking to produce multiple simple designs through commission. If interested, please email whyanimalsdothething at gmail with some example pieces.

(yes, this is a cash money thing thanks for the reminder to mention that @strangebiology - I can’t pay a ton but absolutely can compensate work and hopefully this isn’t an intensive project).

Yes, Your Bucky

Summary: This is a sequel to My James, Your Bucky. The reader and her plum dumpling come to terms with what happened to James.


Word count: 2.5k


Warnings: Angst central, people. You’ve been warned.


A/N: The response to My James, Your Bucky has been so awesome. I did say that if I write the next part it will be painful. You still wanted more. I hope you like it.


I went through all comments and asks to tag people so I hope I haven’t missed anyone out?

Originally posted by dailybuckybarnes




It’s been good few hours since you discovered your flat in a complete mess. You’ve been practically dragged out of there by a man with the bow. Hawkeye, you think was his name. Frankly, quite a few people introduced themselves to you outside, but you couldn’t care less for who they were. Why would you? They all just barged into your life expecting you to be calm and understanding. Calm and understanding?!

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