designer linens

A little while ago I attended Timeline Medieval Festival and as a last minute addition to my kit I made a simple open-front black wool hood. Here I am wearing it in this photo with some awesome WWII re-creationists. 

It was always my intention to make this hood a lot fancier, and this week I had some time off! I started by trying my hand at some embroidery, which is something I haven’t done before but always wanted to. I figured it was better to start off simple, and this was the result. I took this to my nieces christmas carols and sat on the ground hand stitching. I got a lot of interested looks and questions. :)

Next I used the wool hood as a pattern to cut out the green linen lining. I also removed my temporary leaf fastening. 

I used a sewing machine for the inner, un-seen stitching, but all of the exposed stitching is mostly hand sewn. I pinned the wool and linen together and got busy.

Hand stitching along the bottom seem of the hood:

Hand stitching along the front seem and around the face. Time-wise, all this stitching took me watching Hot Fuzz, Shaun of the Dead and an episode of Teen Wolf ;P

Next up, cloth buttons made from the same black wool. You can see my step-by-step pictures of this process here. At this point I’m basing the design more on 14th century styles (plus I really like super long liripipes.)

And here is the mostly finished product after all of the buttons were sewed on!

I lightly sewed the button holes using my machine to get the consistent shape and spacing because the holes are all so close together. Then I went over the stitching by hand for reenforcement and aesthetics. 

Aaaaand that’s about it! I’m super happy with the outcome. The hood is both warm and comfortable, but not too hot that I couldn’t wear it in summer - I specifically used thin wool and linen for this reason. The colours are mostly based on the Melbourne HMB team, but I’ll end up taking it to Bicolline as well. 
I’m super excited to get more into embroidery too.

Josef Frank, textile design Bows, 1960. Linen, cotton.  Via Cooper-Hewitt.

Frank’s interest in pattern design was not unique among Viennese architects; like Josef Hoffmann, Koloman Moser, Otto Czeschka, and Dagobert Peche, he produced several early designs for the Wiener Werkstätte. Unlike other Wiener Werkstätte designers who created a unified design scheme by using the same pattern throughout an interior—on textiles, wallcoverings, and even fashion—Frank preferred an eclectic combination of fabrics in his interiors.