design,

How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior | MoMA

Now on view: How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior explores the external factors and attitudes—aesthetic, social, technological, and political—reflected in modern design. Highlights include recent acquisitions from projects directed by major women architect-designers such as Eileen Gray furnishings for the house E-1027 (1929), and Charlotte Perriand’s study bedroom from the Maison du Brésil (1959). Designs from other noted partnerships include Lilly Reich and Mies van der Rohe’s Velvet and Silk Café (1927), Grete Lihotzky’s Frankfurt Kitchen (1926–27), and collaborations between Aino and Alvar Aalto, Ray and Charles Eames, Florence Knoll and Herbert Matter, and Charlotte Perriand, Pierre Jeanneret and Le Corbusier. 

[Installation view of How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 1, 2016–April 23, 2017. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Gretchen Scott]

(via How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior | MoMA)

Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter | MoMA

Now on view, Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter explores design responses to the global refugee crisis, featuring projects by architects, designers, and artists.

[Nizip II, Container Camp. Tobias Hutzler, 2014. Courtesy of the artist]

(via Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter | MoMA)