design for an office tower

Analemma Tower by Clouds Architecture Office

“Analemma inverts the traditional diagram of an earth-based foundation, instead depending on a space-based supporting foundation from which the tower is suspended. This system is referred to as the Universal Orbital Support System (UOSS). By placing a large asteroid into orbit over earth, a high strength cable can be lowered towards the surface of earth from which a super tall tower can be suspended. Since this new tower typology is suspended in the air, it can be constructed anywhere in the world and transported to its final location. The proposal calls for Analemma to be constructed over Dubai, which has proven to be a specialist in tall building construction at one fifth the cost of New York City construction.”

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The Carbide & Carbon Building is a Chicago landmark located at 230 North Michigan Avenue. The Art Deco building was built in 1929. It was designed by Burnham Brothers. The Carbide and Carbon Building was originally home to the regional office of Union Carbide and Carbon Co., which later became Union Carbide Corp. The skyscraper was designated a Chicago Landmark on May 9, 1996. Built as a high-rise office tower, the Carbide & Carbon Building was transformed more recently into the Hard Rock Hotel Chicago; work on the renovation began in 1998 and was completed in 2004. The conversion was directed by Lucien Lagrange & Associates. The building has 37 floors and is 503 feet (153 m) tall. The current hotel capacity is 383 guest rooms and 13 suites.

Tour Montparnasse

When the nearly 700-foot Tour Montparnasse (center) was completed in 1973, it was considered such a blight on Paris’s historic skyline that the city instated height restrictions on all future buildings. The office tower, designed by Eugène Beaudouin, Urbain Cassan and Louis Hoym de Marien, is the rare destination from which tourists can view the city unmolested by its own dark, Modernist presence.

(Source)

PERIPHERAL CORE PLANS 

From Top to Bottom: 

Arup Associates, IBM Headquarters, Typical Floor Plan, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1976 

Bruce Graham / SOM, Inland Steel Building, Corporate Headquarters, Chicago, Illinois, 1958 

Louis I. Kahn, Design for an Office Tower, Plan, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1952-1957 

Suede's 'Dog Man Star' Album As A Series Of Books

This is my new print. It’s Suede’s album Dog Man Star as if it had been written as a series of novels instead of songs. It’s available now in the Standard Designs Etsy shop.

Ah, 1994. Across the road from the hideous brown office tower known as the IPC Building, home to the music magazines NME and Melody Maker, and where I would often go for meetings at the time (I was in my second ‘badly-paid job in advertising’ to paraphrase Neil Hannon), I spotted the words DOG MAN STAR sprayed in black on a nearby wall. 

Was it really necessary? Because Dog Man Star, in all its battered and defeated and resilient glory, is a huge step beyond its forerunner Suede (which, though great itself, was a mish-mash of singles-material songs and… others, bringing to mind another eponymous debut album, namely The Smiths).

We Are The Pigs is the stand-out track, but the atmospherics of so much of the rest of the album give it a really troublesomely empty feel - in a good way - like a lot of early 1970s British films. It’s a slow-motion version of A Clockwork Orange.

If you’ve not heard it - go and hear it. Now! I command you! And if you have… this print’s for you.