deputy black

6

Margaret’s last clue simply can’t be disregarded. By us, by the storytellers. It has to lead somewhere. But it’s not matched by anything in the show - Hawk never finds anyone on Blue Pine Mountain at night.

It could be a glimmer of hope for the future, that one night, when the moon won’t be darkened anymore, Coop will return to them (”watch for” has a positive connotation, it’s not a warning). Or it could come close to confirming the looping plot theory… especially since the mysterious “Hawk goes to Glastonbury Grove at night; doesn’t find crap” scene is immediately before the pt2 Lodge scene where “you can go out now”. And Glastonbury Grove is on the Blue Pine side of town…

Phil: Well I manage my department, and I’ve been doing that for several years now, and I’ve learned a lot of life lessons along the way. 

Hill: Your department’s just Barton and Romanoff right?

Phil: Yes Maria, but they are not easy to manage

6

Forget the gun, you’re one hell of a deputy, and Black Badge needs you. Screw them.      I need you.

ninja-techie  asked:

Hi there, I was interested in knowing who provided the voice of Mr. Wednesday in the 10th Anniversary audiobook version of American Gods. I listened to the book about a year ago and immediately thought that the voice resembled that of Ian McShane, but have been unable to find a list of who provided what characters for the audiobook. Thank you!

I’ve been meaning to post this for a while. It’s the cast list for AMERICAN GODS. I think everyone is in it, except me.

FRED BERMAN ( MR. IBIS, ICEMAN, GWYDION,  SALIM )

ANNE BOBBY ( AUDREY BURTON, ZORYA P., ESSIE TREGOWAN,     VEGAS WAITRESS, EASTER )

DENNIS BOUTSIKARIS ( NARRATOR )

TIM CAIN ( MR. NANCY )

RICHARD FERRONE ( LOW KEY LYESMITH, HINZELMANN, MR. STONE, MR. WORLD)

ADAM GRUPPER ( CHAD MULLIGAN, WARDEN,  HARRY BLUEJAY, MR. WOOD )

SARAH JONES ( LAURA, BILQUIS, MAMA ZOU ZOU, WIDOW PARIS, MAMA JI, DIANE,  ZORYA U. )

PETE LARKIN ( CZERNOBOG, JACQUEL, WHISKEY JACK )

NIKHIL MAINDIRATTA   (TEENAGE SHADOW )

KATHLEEN McINERNEY ( SAMANTHA BLACK CROW, ALISON McGOVERN, SMALLEST SISTER, SQUIRREL )

RON McLARTY ( MR. WEDNESDAY )

PRENTICE ONAYEMI ( SAM FETISHER, AGASU, BLACK DEPUTY, BARON SAMEDI )

DANIEL ORESKES ( SHADOW )

PAULA PARKER ( ELDERLY WAITRESS, SHADOW’S MOTHER )

NICOLE QUINN ( WOMAN AT PASSENGER ASSISTANCE DESK, WOMAN @ AMOCO CASH REGISTER )

MAGGI-MEG REED ( MARGUERITE OLSEN, BAST,  MRS. McCABE – LAURA’S MOTHER )

YELENA SHMULENSON ( ZORYA V., OFFICER LIZ BUTE,  WAITRESS-SAN FRAN , SOPHIE )

TEDDY WALSH ( LEON )

ALAN WINTER ( PRISON GUARD – REVIEWS SHADOW’S FILE, CASHIER AT LIBRARY SALE, GAS STA. MGR., )

OLIVER WYMAN ( MAD SWEENEY, TECHNICAL BOY/FAT KID, JOHN CHAPMAN, MR. TOWN )

french history masterclass

hi guys! 

as someone who feels personally attacked by the decision of most universities to not share knowledge from all over the world but rather focusing it on several key periods (because money is and will always be more important than universal knowledge), i figured a long time ago that i’d have to hunt the rest all by myself (something i’m not the only one to do, which says the lot). Thus i decided to share with you one of the two main classes i attended this semester. This is a serious class, run by a very serious and really captivating teacher, and ironically, one of the most interesting classes i ever had and yet i always hated its subject from the bottom of my heart (i still do, but the class was super captivating nonetheless), the French Revolution

However, the class is a bit more tricky than just the whole ‘1789 = Bastille’ traditionnal class and is quite specific, so you’d need at least the basic knowledge of the events to fully understand everything. If you guys need to source it in an assignment, i’ll happily give you sources about it (sources that will not be 'my tumblr friend’s text post’), but the official sources given by our teacher the whole semester. Under the cut, you’ll find the summary of roughly 13 weeks of a class called “Freedom or Death: dying as a deputy (1792-1795)”. Three shorter chapters might be added if someone feels interested in it (one about the deportation of political opponents, another one dedicated to the guillotine itself, and a last one dedicated to the damnatio memoriae). No need to say that i’m not a professional and it might be an awful translation (it probably is) but \_(ツ)_/

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4

Anna Pauline “Pauli” Murray (November 20, 1910 – July 1, 1985) was a civil rights activist, women’s rights activist, lawyer, and author. She was also the first black woman ordained an Episcopal priest. Born in Baltimore, she later moved to New York and obtained a degree in English in 1933. In 1940 she was arrested for violating Virginia’s segregation laws on a bus. This incident, along with her involvement in the socialist Workers Defense League to free a Black sharecropper from execution for killing his white landlord, led her to become a civil rights lawyer. She enrolled at Howard University’s law school where she, along with James Farmer and Bayard Rustin co-founded C.O.R.E. (Congress for Racial Equality) in 1942. 

While at Howard, she became conscious of sexism, or “Jane Crow” as she called it. As one of the few women law students there, she found herself the object not of hostility but of ridicule. On her first day of classes she was shocked to hear her professor announce that he didn’t know why women went to law school, but that since they were there, he guessed the men would have to put up with them. She responded with steely silence. “The professor didn’t know it,” she later wrote, “but he had just guaranteed that I would be the top student in his class.” 

After passing the California bar exam in 1945, Murray became the state’s first black deputy attorney general. It would be Murray’s 1950 book States’ Laws on Race and Color that NAACP lawyer Thurgood Marshall would hail as the “bible” of the civil rights movement, directly contributing to the 1954 Brown vs. Board decision. Respect for her mind did not improve her treatment by men in the movement however. In 1963, she became one of the first to criticize the sexism of the civil rights movement. In a letter to civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph, among other grievances, she criticized the fact in the 1963 March on Washington no women were invited to make one of the major speeches or to be part of its delegation of leaders who went to the White House:

I have been increasingly perturbed over the blatant disparity between the major role which Negro women have played and are playing in the crucial grassroots levels of our struggle and the minor role of leadership they have been assigned in the national policy-making decisions. It is indefensible to call a national march on Washington and send out a call which contains the name of not a single woman leader.[x]

Murray lived in Ghana from 1960–61, serving on the faculty of the Ghana School of Law. She then returned to the US and studied at Yale Law School, becoming the first African-American to receive a J.S.D. from the school in 1965. Murray co-wrote the critical position papers on the E.R.A., Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and the American Civil Liberties Union brief for the White v. Crook case, which successfully challenged all-white, all-male juries in Lowndes County, Alabama. In 1966 she was one of the founding members of NOW (National Organization for Women), but resigned when the white women of the organization failed to incorporate analysis of racial oppression into their activism.

[I’ve begun to] reassess my entire relationship to the women’s movement and to ponder how I can remain effective without exposing myself to humiliation, for it is humiliating to be deliberately excluded from participation in an area to which one has devoted many years of one’s life.[x]

In 1973, Murray left law and academia for the Episcopal Church, becoming a priest, and was the first Black woman named an Episcopal saint in 2012.

Time Upon Once, ch. 6 (6/?)

Summary:  Killian Jones is a bailbonds man, living in Boston and doing his own thing. But on his 29th birthday, a kid knocks on his door and claims to be his son. What happens when Killian is forced to face his past along with a mystery prophecy about his own purpose in life?

Rating: M (eventually)

A huge thank you to @tnlph @businesscasualprincess and @blessed-but-distressed  for beta duties and @shady-swan-jones for the banner!

Tagging a few people that showed interest in this story: @lk0622 @nowforruin @sambethe@xemmaloveskillianx  @l-e-x-a-xd @profoundlyfadedprincess @once-uponacaptain@icecubelotr44  @poetic-justice-96  @allietumbles (want to be tagged? let me know and I’ll do it)

on Tumblr: I II III IV V

ao3 ff.net

Chapter VI

“I’m not wearing a bloody uniform, mate,” Killian said in a childish tone, looking at the hideous brown uniform as if it had offended him personally.

“It’s mandatory,” Graham tried to convince him.

You don’t wear one. If you can exert authority wearing a leather jacket, so can I,” Killian cocked an eyebrow at him. “Besides, brown doesn’t suit my complexion.”

Graham chuckled. “Oh well, if it’s ruining your good looks…” He held out a badge in his hand. “At least wear the badge? Make it official?”

“That I can definitely do,” Killian said and Graham tossed him the badge. He caught it and moved to clip it on his belt.

The moment he finished the clipping the room around them began to shake, with objects falling off shelves and glass shattering all around. Killian grabbed a hold of the desk, riding out the tremor. Then it was over almost immediately, a moment of calm before Killian registered the noise of car alarms going off outside and every phone in the place started to ring. Graham lift his head to smile at him. “Welcome to Storybrooke Sheriff’s Station, Deputy Jones.”

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In August 2010…a team of heavily armed Orange County, Florida, sheriff’s deputies raided several black- and Hispanic-owned barbershops in the Orlando area. More raids followed in September and October. The Orlando Sentinel reported that police held barbers and customers at gunpoint and put some in handcuffs, while they turned the shops inside out. The police raided a total of nine shops and arrested thirty-seven people.
By all appearances, these raids were drug sweeps. Shop owners told the Sentinel that police asked them where they were holding illegal drugs and weapons. But in the end, thirty-four of the thirty-seven arrests were for “barbering without a license”, a misdemeanor for which only three people have ever served jail time in Florida.
The most disturbing aspect of the Orlando raids was that police didn’t even attempt to obtain a legal search warrant. They didn’t need to, because they conducted the raids in conjunction with the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Despite the guns and handcuffs, under Florida law these were licensure inspections, not criminal searches, so no warrants were necessary.
—  Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces by Radley Balko