depower

The best way I can describe my thoughts on a human Bill…did you ever see that TNG episode where Q gets depowered and he’s basically this obnoxious baby that everyone has to go out of their way to take care of just to keep him alive? Like that, but way, way more unpredictable, violent and annoying.

Personally, I’m expecting that EOA6 is just going to be a long chain of hilarious anticlimaxes. To get the obvious ones out of the way:

  • Alt!Callie will absorb the Green Sun, thus depowering Jade and the Becs and derailing their final battle
  • Lord Jack and Spades Slick will fight each other, completely ignoring Terezi and the Striders
  • Jake will make friends with the Felt before any significant violence can occur

I’m not sure how the confrontation between John’s team and the Condesce will fizzle out, but there must be an angle there, too.

10

[VILLAIN] Witch Bandora.

Japanese name: 魔女バンドーラ
Romanized name: Majo Bandoora

Alignment: Bandora Gang
Villain Type: Boss
Inspiration: Witch
Status: Defeated.

From: Kyouryuu Sentai Zyuranger

Trivia

  • Bandora’s actor, Machiko Soga, passed away in 2006. Beforehand, she starred as non-villain Magiel in Magiranger. Her other tokusatsu roles include: Queen Hedrian (Denziman, Sun Vulcan), Laraba (Maskman), the voice of Ball Boy (Machineman) and a minor character in Battle Fever J.
  • Bandora’s name could be inspired by the Greek deity Pandora. The release of the Bandora Gang from the seal might be a reference to the opening of Pandora’s jar (often mistakenly called “Pandora’s box”). In Greek, the word “pithos” means “jar.” The vase-like imprisonment that Bandora and her minions were placed inside of in the finale resembles a typical pithos.
  • Unlike many of the archenemies in tokusatsu, Bandora survived. She was depowered after crying over her son’s death, and she was sealed away along with her henchmen.
  • Bandora wielded the Dora Scepter (ドーラセプター).
  • For the Japanese broadcast of Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Machiko Soga returned to dub Rita Repulsa’s lines.
  • Bandora was the cause of the dinosaurs’ extinction.
  • She was originally the queen of an ancient tribe of humans known as the Dal.

Source: tokumonster.tumblr.com

PSA

If you’re tired of reading fanfiction where black characters are forgotten, vilified, depowered, humiliated, or killed just for “the hell of it”, please reblog.

If you’re tired of trying to find a Rhodey fanfiction that gives him something to do besides babysit Tony and get Stony together, please reblog.

If you’re tired of reading fanfiction where Nick Fury is a raging dick FOR NO REASON AT ALL, please reblog.

If you’re tired of reading fanfiction where black women are blown up and murdered simply for the sake of causing the white characters pain, please reblog.

If you’re tired of trying to find slash fanfiction with black men, or women and don’t find ANYTHING please reblog.

If you’re tired of reading romance fics where EVERYONE is paired up with someone ACCEPT the black characters, please reblog.

If you’re tired of reading fanfiction stories where black people don’t exist (even though the canon show/novel/video game/ whatever shows that they do) please reblog.

And if you’re sick of that crap, please write a fanfiction with multiple black characters who are 3 dimensional. Who are gay, or regal, or tough, or vulnerable and post it EVERYWHERE. Starting with the #blackinfanfiction tag

theatlantic.com
The Feminists Of Wakanda
By Ta-Nehisi Coates

The feminist critique is in the air now. If my rendition of Black Panther wasn’t created by that critique, it breathed the same air. I can’t really kill off or depower women characters without grappling with Gail Simone. I can’t really think about how women characters are drawn anymore without thinking about the women in Bitch Planet, and how they seem drawn beyond the male gaze.

This is why criticism is important. The job of criticism isn’t to interrupt or encourage commercial prospects. (“Batman vs Superman smashes Box Office, despite critic complaints!”) Criticism should push our imagination and help us understand what is actually possible in art and, I’d argue, even what is moral. Through much of my time collecting comic books I never took much issue with how women were drawn. I had a vague sense that there was something about, say, the reworking of Psylocke that bugged me. But I simply didn’t give it much thought. It never occurred to me, for instance, to ask whether a superhero’s pose was anatomically possible. It never occurred to me to ask why a super-hero would have a DD cup-size. Was that for her benefit or for mine? I never asked.

The feminist critique of comics has made “not asking” a lot harder. That, in itself, is a victory. The point is not to change the thinking of the active sexist. (Highly unlikely.) The point is  to force the passive sexist to take responsibility for his own thoughts.

Shoutout to my fellow Kory fans/writers ! So, I have a folder of old icons that’s been sitting on my computer for a while now and I thought I’d share them! There’s 1000+ icons of Kory from various comics and they can be found here on my google drive. The icons are all of varying qualities (some of them are old af) but I guarantee there’s some good stuff in there.

  • All icons are 100x100
  • Like/reblog this post if you use the icons!
  • Remember to credit me on your blog if you use them, please.
  • Feel free to edit as you please~

The Feminists Of Wakanda - Ta-Nehisi Coates

…There’s been an ongoing conversation about how women appear in comic books (and women who create comic books) for some time. With the advent of social media it’s gotten harder to ignore that debate. You don’t really have to be a admitted feminist to know what it means to be “fridged.” And whether you agree with it or not, a comic book fan has to be willfully blind to not be aware of the critique of how women’s bodies have been presented in the form.

The feminist critique is in the air now. If my rendition of Black Panther wasn’t created by that critique, it breathed the same air. I can’t really kill off or depower women characters without grappling with Gail Simone. I can’t really think about how women characters are drawn anymore without thinking about the women in Bitch Planet, and how they seem drawn beyond the male gaze.

This is why criticism is important… [+]

WΛW | Like : Tweet : Pin : Blog

#WeAreWakanda  

Basically, the temptation to say a character is super rich is appealing because it seems like it makes things easier if your character never has to worry about finances. Like, you can just wave your hand and say “and we never had to worry about how they afford this nice house/education/collection of possessions again”. But at the same time you can write yourself into the “why don’t they just-” corner with it. Wealth is almost like magic in a storytelling perspective. What are the limitations of this magic? What are the consequences of this magic? What happens when a character who has never experienced magic suddenly becomes imbued with powers? What happens when a character who’s used to having unlimited magic at their disposal is suddenly depowered? If a character has basically all the magic they could ever want, what’s stopping them from fulfilling their every whim?

Hello, friends.

If you walk into a crowd at any Supernatural convention, chances are a good portion of said crowd will be female-presenting.  The irony here is that the first “fan convention” presented on the show itself hosted an entirely male-presenting crowd.  Of course, once the writers and producers became more aware of their audience, the perception changed.  What hasn’t changed is the way female characters are treated on the show, and it’s something that female fans repeatedly bring up in meta, in conversations with each other, in hashtags and tumblr posts, facebook groups and livejournal entries.  Some fans have stopped watching the show entirely after certain female characters were “fridged” –  a term coined by Gail Simone to refer to women who have been injured, killed, or depowered as a plot device within various media avenues usually propping up a male character’s desires for revenge/justice/whatever. It’s a term any good feminist is familiar with.  We’re all angry about it.

I remember a moment where I wrote in a blog post about wishing that there was a female equivalent of Supernatural, where the women were not defined by men or their relationships with men.  Someone snarkily replied with “Buffy,” which infuriated me to no end.  It’s like saying “a woman did this thing once so we don’t need women to do other new things in this field” and – forgive me – but that’s actually the biggest crock of bullshit ever.  Nevermind the fact that there hasn’t been another show similar to it since the late 90’s.  But I’m not here to go into a huge tangent about Buffy.  I didn’t watch Buffy, I have no real interest in watching Buffy.  I wanted female hunters that had taken up their jobs because they wanted to and had been interested in it.  I wanted male side characters that would be equal to them instead of bumbling idiots that made the female leads look competent through their own failings. I wanted character development instead of repeated cycling, without unnecessary drama and suffering.

I still watch Supernatural, but I pine for these things.  I think we all do.  And if the Winchesters were suddenly women, you can bet there’d suddenly be more clinginess and daddy issues since that’s already the default that male-dominated Hollywood gives to female characters. But there are other parts of fandom, at least in its earlier years if memory serves, that got extremely aggressive any time a female character was introduced.  They didn’t want this-or-that female character hooking up with the boys.  How dare that harlot sully their perfect boys!  Taking their eyes off the Family Business!  The production took that small but loud minority and reacted to it by killing these women and therefore betraying us all but has somehow ignored the outcry for more and better female representation.  There’s other arguments to be added to the pile, but the long and short of it is that the women characters were never treated the way they were deserved in my humble opinion.  Either they were purposefully archetypal to fulfill the base needs the boys spent their whole life needing and ultimately died, or they were villains who died; if they were younger women, they were little sisters or needed to be protected; if they were older women, they were always mothers; if they were beautiful, they were sexual conquests.

It was frustrating.  It’s still frustrating.  Rarely were we given a female character with a recurring role who survived.  I still want that, but I’m not sure it’s a desire that will ever be fulfilled outside of fan fiction or long-winded debates among small groups of friends.

That’s basically the spark behind “Ladies of SPN Con.”  I wanted the opportunity to talk to all these amazing female actresses: to ask them about their characters, why they chose to play them, how they approached the roles, how they felt about the way the characters ended up, what they hoped to accomplish.  Going even further, I found myself wanting to ask questions about the crew involved in the show as well: what brought them into Supernatural, what kept them there, what they loved about their roles in making the show come alive on screen, what they hoped would improve.  I found myself digging deep, realizing how few female writers we had and how they all seemed to trickle off as the show continued on; learning how there’d only been 2-3 female directors; how there were no VFX women.  Again, this infuriated me.  Why was this the case?  I wanted to open a dialogue, not only with the cast and crew of the show I’ve spent the last 10 years fully engrossed in, but with the fan community as a whole.  I wanted to give people the opportunity they so obviously craved.  Even the actresses craved it – I could see it in twitter exchanges with Kim Rhodes and Julia McNiven and the fans, the outrage that immediately came from the death of Celeste Middleton and the hashtag campaign that exploded out of it.  

In short, we wanted to open a dialogue, not only with the cast and crew of the show we’ve spent the last 10 years fully engrossed in, but with the fan community as a whole. We wanted to give people the opportunity they so obviously craved.With all this said, there is a lot of work ahead. We’ve spoken with at least a dozen past and recent actresses, all of whom are eager and anticipating us giving them set-in-stone information. Academic types and crew are also on standby. People have assembled to make this happen and are just as driven as we are. This is going to happen if it’s the last thing we do. Let’s all unite to take this idea and see it flourish. Our favorite female actresses and industry ladies need our support! Tweet about it, tumble about it, tell your facebook friends and your coworkers!

And to quote Kim Manners: let’s kick it in the ass, shall we?

3

Rai: The Orphan (2015)  //  Valiant Comics

A fallen, broken, and depowered Rai finds himself captured by a mysterious and savage tribe on Earth! With his friends being hunted and tortured back in New Japan, Rai will find help in an unexpected yet familiar face who knows a thing or two about survival.

Story: Matt Kindt, art: Clayton Crain

Get it now here


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