democratic republic of afghanistan

A Message to the "Women's March" and "Feminists"

I am not a “disgrace to women” because I don’t support the Women’s March. I do not feel I am a “second class citizen” because I am a woman. I do not feel my voice is “not heard” because I am a woman. I do not feel I am not provided opportunities in this life or in America because I am a woman. I do not feel that I “don’t have control of my body or choices” because I am a woman. I do not feel like I am “ not respected or undermined” because I am a woman. 

I AM a woman.
I can make my own choices.
I can speak and be heard.
I can VOTE.
I can work if I want.
I control my body.
I can defend myself.
I can defend my family.

There is nothing stopping me to do anything in this world but MYSELF.
I do not blame my circumstances or problems on anything other than my own choices or even that sometimes in life, we don’t always get what we want. I take responsibility for myself.

I am a mother, a daughter, a wife, a sister, a friend. I am not held back in life but only by the walls I choose to not go over which is a personal choice.
Quit blaming.
Take responsibility.
If you want to speak, do so. But do not expect for me, a woman, to take you seriously wearing a pink vagina hat on your head and screaming profanities and demonizing men.

If you have beliefs, and speak to me in a kind matter, I will listen. But do not expect for me to change my beliefs to suit yours.

Respect goes both ways.

If you want to impress me, especially in regards to women, then speak on the real injustices and tragedies that affect women in foreign countries that do not that the opportunity or means to have their voices heard.

In Saudi Arabia, women can’t drive, have no rights and must always be covered.

In China and India, there’s infantcide of baby girls.

In Afghanistan, there’s unequal education rights.

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, the rapes are often and brutal and women are left to die. They’re left HIV, STD and AIDS infected and left to care for themselves and children alone.

In Mali and Egypt, women cannot escape the torture of genital mutilation.

In Pakistan, in tribal areas women are gang raped to pay for men’s crimes.

In Guatemala, the impoverished female underclass faces domestic violence, rape and the second-highest rate of HIV/AIDS after sub-Saharan Africa.

An epidemic of gruesome unsolved murders has left hundreds of women dead, some of their bodies left with hate messages.

And that’s just a few examples.

So when women get together in AMERICA and whine they don’t have equal rights and march in their clean clothes, after eating a hearty breakfast, and it’s like a vacation away that they have paid for to get there…

This WOMAN does not support it.

- a female Facebook user

5 Things You Probably Don’t Know About Pneumonia

Pneumonia is a very common illness that causes infection in the lungs. At best, it causes mild symptoms such as a cough or fever; at worst it can cause death. Unfortunately, pneumonia is one of those illnesses that seems to get swept under the rug - but no more! In recognition of World Pneumonia Day on 12 November, UNICEF wants to get the word out so we can all help save and protect children around the world.

1.    Everyone can get pneumonia

One common myth is that pneumonia mostly affects older people. However, everyone is at risk. This includes children, especially those who live in areas with high levels of air pollution. In fact, half of all pneumonia deaths in children are linked to air pollution!

2.    Pneumonia is the leading infectious killer of children under five. 

Even though pneumonia is preventable and treatable, 922,000 children died from it last year. That’s 2,500 children per day and 1 every 35 seconds! Pneumonia in the most deadly infectious disease in children, causing more deaths than malaria, tuberculosis, measles and AIDS combined!

3.    A lot less children are dying from pneumonia!

Between 2000 and 2015 the amount of deaths in children from pneumonia decreased by 47%! That is awesome, but there is still more work to be done. This is the slowest rate of decline among (the main) childhood diseases.

4.    The majority of childhood pneumonia cases occur in 10 countries.

60% of deaths occur in Chad, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, Ethiopia, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, China and Indonesia. Pneumonia is more common in rural areas, poor areas and areas with poor air quality and unclean water.

5.    There are a lot of ways to fight pneumonia. 

These include vaccines, breastfeeding, access to safe drinking water, improving overall sanitation, good nutritional habits for children and improving air quality, especially inside the home. It all starts with raising awareness and sharing solutions.

You can do something today: help us get the word out! One death from pneumonia is one too many. If you want to get involved and help save the lives of thousands of children visit everybreathcounts.info

You’ve traveled extensively and seen women in the most extraordinary circumstances. What have you learned about the universal experience of being a woman?
I’ve learned about the resilience of women and how incredibly strong they are. Most women were built to survive. There is a biological and visceral need to take care of our children. I’ve seen the most incredible women in the most vulnerable circumstances and they have become role-models to me. Every difficult situation that I’ve been through, I think back to the women in the Democratic Republic of Congo, women in Darfur, women in Afghanistan, and women in Iraq who I’ve interviewed along the way and have survived.

A powerful example of that is the photograph you took of a woman in eastern Congo in 2008 with her two children…
…Under the bug nets, yes. Those children were born out of multiple gang rapes. And there she was, taking care of them with all the love in the world.

We Spoke to Frontline Photojournalist Lynsey Addario About Fear and Female Resilience

I am not a “disgrace to women” because I don’t support the women’s march. I do not feel I am a “second class citizen” because I am a woman. I do not feel my voice is “not heard” because I am a woman. I do not feel I am not provided opportunities in this life or in America because I am a woman. I do not feel that I “don’t have control of my body or choices” because I am a woman. I do not feel like I am “ not respected or undermined” because I am a woman.
I AM a woman.
I can make my own choices.
I can speak and be heard.
I can VOTE.
I can work if I want.
I control my body.
I can defend myself.
I can defend my family.
There is nothing stopping me to do anything in this world but MYSELF.
I do not blame my circumstances or problems on anything other than my own choices or even that sometimes in life, we don’t always get what we want. I take responsibility for myself.
I am a mother, a daughter, a wife, a sister, a friend. I am not held back in life but only by the walls I choose to not go over which is a personal choice.
Quit blaming.
Take responsibility.
If you want to speak, do so. But do not expect for me, a woman, to take you seriously wearing a pink va-jay-jay hat on your head and screaming profanities and bashing men.
If you have beliefs, and speak to me in a kind matter, I will listen. But do not expect for me to change my beliefs to suit yours. Respect goes both ways.
If you want to impress me, especially in regards to women, then speak on the real injustices and tragedies that affect women in foreign countries that do not that the opportunity or means to have their voices heard.
Saudi Arabia, women can’t drive, no rights and must always be covered.
China and India, infantcide of baby girls.
Afghanistan, unequal education rights.
Democratic Republic of Congo, where rapes are brutal and women are left to die, or HIV infected and left to care for children alone.
Mali, where women can not escape the torture of genital mutilation.
Pakistan, in tribal areas where women are gang raped to pay for men’s crime.
Guatemala, the impoverished female underclass of Guatemala faces domestic violence, rape and the second-highest rate of HIV/AIDS after sub-Saharan Africa. An epidemic of gruesome unsolved murders has left hundreds of women dead, some of their bodies left with hate messages.
And that’s just a few examples.
So when women get together in AMERICA and whine they don’t have equal rights and march in their clean clothes, after eating a hearty breakfast, and it’s like a vacation away that they have paid for to get there…
This WOMAN does not support it.

I am not a “disgrace to women” because I don’t support the women’s march. I do not feel I am a “second class citizen” because I am a woman. I do not feel my voice is “not heard” because I am a woman. I do not feel I am not provided opportunities in this life or in America because I am a woman. I do not feel that I “don’t have control of my body or choices” because I am a woman. I do not feel like I am “ not respected or undermined” because I am a woman.
I AM a woman.
I can make my own choices.
I can speak and be heard.
I can VOTE.
I can work if I want.
I control my body.
I can defend myself.
I can defend my family.
There is nothing stopping me to do anything in this world but MYSELF.
I do not blame my circumstances or problems on anything other than my own choices or even that sometimes in life, we don’t always get what we want. I take responsibility for myself.
I am a mother, a daughter, a wife, a sister, a friend. I am not held back in life but only by the walls I choose to not go over which is a personal choice.
Quit blaming.
Take responsibility.
If you want to speak, do so. But do not expect for me, a woman, to take you seriously wearing a pink va-jay-jay hat on your head and screaming profanities and bashing men.
If you have beliefs, and speak to me in a kind matter, I will listen. But do not expect for me to change my beliefs to suit yours. Respect goes both ways.
If you want to impress me, especially in regards to women, then speak on the real injustices and tragedies that affect women in foreign countries that do not have the opportunity or means to have their voices heard.
Saudi Arabia, women can’t drive, no rights and must always be covered.
China and India, infantcide of baby girls.
Afghanistan, unequal education rights.
Democratic Republic of Congo, where rapes are brutal and women are left to die, or HIV infected and left to care for children alone.
Mali, where women can not escape the torture of genital mutilation.
Pakistan, in tribal areas where women are gang raped to pay for men’s crime.
Guatemala, the impoverished female underclass of Guatemala faces domestic violence, rape and the second-highest rate of HIV/AIDS after sub-Saharan Africa. An epidemic of gruesome unsolved murders has left hundreds of women dead, some of their bodies left with hate messages.
And that’s just a few examples.
So when women get together in AMERICA and whine they don’t have equal rights and march in their clean clothes, after eating a hearty breakfast, and it’s like a vacation away that they have paid for to get there…
This WOMAN does not support it. I have that right!

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It is that time of year again…Record Store Day UK 2014! 

My art can be found on three 7 inch records with Secret 7". One of a kind designs made especially on vinyl sleeve records for three different musicians.

Head down to the huge event if you are in London.

They will be exhibited Downstairs At Mother in London on April 12th & 13th, then on Record Store Day - April 19th - you can get your hands on one, or more, for £45 a piece.

Open from 10am - 6pm, and it’s free to view.

Downstairs At Mother, 10 Redchurch St, London, E2 7DJ.

It is an annual event that combines music and art for a good cause. Independent record stores come together with artists to celebrate the art of music. Special releases & products are made exclusively for the day. War Child is the official charity for 2014.

War Child works globally focusing on helping and preventing the most vulnerable children from having their lives torn apart in the cycle of conflict. Their work supports and protects children living and working on the streets, exploited in the worst forms of child labour and child-survivors of kidnapping and sexual violence.

The charity is currently working in Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, Uganda and Syria, committed to communities for the long term – during the fighting and the aftermath too when communities are coping with the legacy of war, helping them rebuild their lives.