delian league

anonymous asked:

you mentioned that you know a good amount about ancient greece and i would love to hear you elaborate more on that!!! capri is kind of a weird blend of multiple time periods and cultural influences and i was wondering what you thought akielon society/culture/religion/economy/political structure would really look like? feel free to ramble i need my historical accuracy fix for this fandom 😅

Oh wow, you want to hear me rant about this? That is, like, a huge gift because I rant about this constantly and I will take any excuse. :D 

Note: Before I start, this is mostly conjecture and headcanon. This also may not shed any light on what you’re interested in, dear Anon, because it’s mostly a load of waffle. I’m sorry if I didn’t explain any of the details about ancient Greece in enough detail, but this is really fucking long already. Google is your friend on any classical subjects you’re confused about.

Okay, the first thing I’m going to say is that, as a classicist, there are tons of things you can pick out as being different about Akielos. Akielos is a fantasy country, so it’s not identical to Greece or Rome (it’s sort of Reece sometimes?) and there is nothing wrong with it not fitting directly, even if it is inspired by those cultures. It’s made up and so I won’t try to nitpick.

Next thing about Capri’s universe in general is that Vere is probably 15th century France. I think this is really interesting to remember when thinking about relations between Vere and Akielos. When I met Pacat I talked to her about Veretian technology, and she explained that rather than scaling up Akielon/ancient world technology, she scaled down Veretian tech. In 15th century France they had gunpowder and really advanced ships etc. etc. so if Vere was that technologically advanced, and Akielos still had ancient Greek weapons and tech then obviously Vere would wipe the floor with Akielos in war. She toned down the Veretian technology but not the culture.

Note: Vask is, as far as I can see, complete fantasy. I imagine the language as Scandinavian but I think there might some inspiration from mythological Amazons.

Okay I’m trying to go through this more logically now. 

Akielon Society/Politics -

Akielos does have more of an honour culture than ancient Greece. Remember when Damen is uncomfortable with taking a fort through trickery? Yeah, ancient Greeks would have been fine with that, even commended it. I imagine the society as more like Macedonian society and less like Athenian culture (which obviously in the glory days was a democracy rather than a monarchy). The strongest do best, it’s a warrior culture, but there is also an informal relationship with the king. The Macedonians, for example, could call their king by his first name, and they elected their kings. Although Damen is referred to as ‘Exalted’, there is a sense of informality in his relations with the kyroi. He also needs the approval of the kyroi in ruling the country.

I just said I don’t see Akielos as similar at all to Athens, but there is one thing they have in common. I think the relationship between the king in Ios and the kyroi is a bit like the Delian League or the Peloponnesian League. I mean, obviously Athens exacted money and tribute from the city states in the Delian League (and they weren’t very happy about it), but it is clear that the kyroi retain more independent rule than, for example, the nobles in Vere, so one might describe them as more like tributary states and less like part of one country.

Akielos also bears some similarities to Sparta, as it clearly has more of a sport/hunting/land fighting culture than Athens, which was more interested in drama/philosophy/sailing. However, the Akielon slave culture is slightly more similar to Athens again. Spartans had the closest thing in the ancient world to an American slave culture, because the helots were a race of people they had enslaved. Athenians simply had slaves from all over. Akielon slaves don’t seem to be slaves because of their race (this is never ever mentioned), so in that respect it is less like Sparta.

Language Fact: Kyroi is the plural form of the ancient Greek noun κυρος, which means supreme power or authority. This further emphasises my idea that the kyroi have a lot of individual power. κυρος is also where we get the name Kyros (Cyrus) for Kyros the Great, the famous Persian king (the Persian names are very different to the Greek versions that we are familiar with).

Akielon Economy - 

I am guessing the Akielons use something like drachmas. If Akielos is like Greece geographically then they would not have had a lot of forests or woods and would need to trade something (such as silver, which Athens had a lot of) for wood. This may be why Akielos does not seem to have a great navy (as Athens is famous for - I repeat what I said about how Akielos is more like Macedon/Sparta than Athens). If Akielos’ main source of wood is Vere (Patras would be similar geographically and Vask would not provide easy trade, as it has no borders with Akielos) then they would not be able to build ships during wartime.

.Akielon Religion - 

This was another thing I asked Pacat about when I met her. She said she had originally wanted to create a universe where religion was very much in the background, barely there at all, so that it could reflect her own beliefs. However, she did mention in gods in the poem (probably inspired by Homer) in Kings Rising. I think religion is probably the area where the Capri universe differs most from its inspiration. If Akielos were Greece, Damen would constantly be praying to the gods he particularly worshipped, or making sacrifices before setting out for battle. There would also be a religious conflict between Vere, which if it is 15th century France would be monotheistic, and Akielos, which would be polytheistic. Since none of these are mentioned or explored in the books, we must assume that religion has faded in both countries. The gods mentioned in the poem might be specific to the island of Isthima which the poet came from or may be relics of a previous age. 

A helpful resource for those interested in the world of Captive Prince is this interactive map. There is a lot of information here on Akielon and Veretian culture that you don’t get explicitly in the books.  

Shameless self promotion: I also explore how Akielons might see Veretians the way that the Greeks saw Persians in my fanfic, Quiet Breaths.

4

Temple of Hephaestus, Thesseion, Athens

Hephaestus was the patron god of metal working, craftsmanship, and fire. There were numerous potters’ workshops and metal-working shops in the vicinity of the temple, as befits the temple’s honoree. Archaeological evidence suggests that there was no earlier building on the site except for a small sanctuary that was burned when the Persians occupied Athens in 480 BC. The name Theseion or Temple of Theseus was attributed to the monument under the assumption it housed the remains of the Athenian hero Theseus, brought back to the city from the island of Skyros  by Kimon in 475 BC, but refuted after inscriptions from within the temple associated it firmly with Hephaestus.

After the battle of Plataea, the Greeks swore never to rebuild their sanctuaries destroyed by the Persians during their invasion of Greece, but to leave them in ruins, as a perpetual reminder of the war. The Athenians directed their funds towards rebuilding their economy and strengthening their influence in the Delian League. When Pericles came to power, he envisioned a grand plan for transforming Athens into the centre of Greek power and culture. Construction started in 449 BCE, and some scholars believe the building not to have been completed for some three decades, funds and workers having been redirected towards the Parthenon. The  western frieze was completed between 445–440 BC, while the eastern frieze, the western pediment and several changes in the building’s interior are dated by these scholars to 435–430 BC, largely on stylistic grounds. It was only during the Peace of Nicias (421–415 BC) that the roof was completed and the cult images were installed. The temple was officially inaugurated in 416–415 BC.

Greeks in pre-Roman Gaul

Gyptis and Protis (1874) by Joanny Rave

The oldest city within modern France, Marseille, was founded around 600 BC by Greeks from the Asia Minor city of Phocaea as a trading post or emporion under the name Μασσαλία (Massalia).

A foundation myth reported by Aristotle in the 4th century BC as well as by Latin authors, recounts how the Phocaean Protis (son of Euxenus) married Gyptis (or Petta), the daughter of a local Segobriges king called Nannus, thus giving him the right to receive a piece of land where he was able to found a city. The contours of the Greek city have been partially excavated in several neighborhoods. The Phocaean Greeks introduced the cult of Artemis, as in their other colonies.

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Silver Stater from Abdera, Thrace, c. 411/10-386/5 BC

The figure of Herakles on the reverse of this coin is considered to be one of the finest depictions of him in Greek coinage. The composition, although showing him at rest, clearly illustrates his power and strength. The griffin on the obverse is shown as if it is at the moment of landing, as its wings are slightly open giving the impression that they are still lightly fluttering. This stater of Abdera is one of the finest engraved of that series.

(Obverse: ABΔH inscribed , griffin seated to left, its wings slightly spread, a cicada on left. Reverse: EΠIΦIΛA / ΔOΣ inscribed , Herakles seated facing three-quarters to left on a rock draped with a lion’s skin, his torso and head turned facing, he holds a club in his right hand that rests on his right knee, and he rests his left elbow on his thigh, all within a shallow incuse square.)

Abdera saw its height of prosperity soon after 544 BC, when the majority of the people of Teos (including the poet Anacreon) migrated to Abdera to escape the Persian yoke (Herodotus i. 168). The chief coin type, a griffin, is identical with that of Teos’ coinage. The Teans brought the Gryphon myth with them to Abdera.

In 513 BC and 512 BC, the Persians conquered Abdera. In 492 BC, the Persians again conquered Abdera, this time under Darius I. It later became part of the Delian League and fought on the side of Athens in the Peloponnesian war. Abdera was a wealthy city, the third richest in the League, due to its status as a prime port for trade with the interior of Thrace and the Odrysian kingdom. A valuable prize, the city was repeatedly sacked: by the Triballi in 376 BC, Philip II of Macedon in 350 BC; later by Lysimachos of Thrace, the Seleucids, the Ptolemies, and again by the Macedonians. In 170 BC the Roman armies and those of Eumenes II of Pergamon besieged and sacked it. The town seems to have declined in importance after the middle of the 4th century BC.

Abdera (map) is not far from the mouth of the Nestos River, almost directly opposite the island of Thasos.The site is occupied by the modern town of Ávdhira in the Xanthi regional unit of Thrace, Greece.

champagnesuperkonrad  asked:

A question, but first I just wanted to say I love the blog! Ok, so what do you think is the most significant battle in history, and why?

During the Greco-Persian Wars, Battle of the Eurymedon in 466 BCE which ended Persian incursions in Greece and led to the Greek-influenced culture of the Romans, which led to modern Europe. If the Persians had defeated the Delian League, the world would be a very different place. To start with, the Roman Empire (if it existed at all) would be Persian-influenced, so two of the top three spoken languages, English and Spanish, would be very very different.


There are no similar battles in China. The dominant Han culture was never truly threatened. It dominated its sphere of influence for millenia, and shaped modern Japanese, Chinese, Mongolian, and Vietnamese culture. If there was a similar turning point in Chinese history, though, I would have said that battle.