degree in science

Meet America’s #NewAstronauts

We’re so excited to introduce America’s new astronauts! After evaluating a record number of applications, we’re proud to present our 2017 astronaut class!

These 12 new astronaut candidates were chosen from more than 18,300 people who submitted applications from December 2015 to February 2016. This was more than double the previous record of 8,000 set in 1978.

Meet them…

Kayla Barron

This Washington native graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a Bachelor’s degree in Systems Engineering. A Gates Cambridge Scholar, Barron earned a Master’s degree in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Cambridge.

She enjoys hiking, backpacking, running and reading.

Zena Cardman

Zena is a native of Virginia and completed a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and Master of Science degree in Marine Sciences at The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research has focused on microorganisms in subsurface environments, ranging from caves to deep sea sediments.

In her free time, she enjoys canoeing, caving, raising backyard chickens and glider flying.

Raja Chari

Raja is an Iowa native and graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1999 with Bachelor’s degrees in Astronautical Engineering and Engineering Science. He continued on to earn a Master’s degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

He has accumulated more than 2,000 hours of flight time in the F-35, F-15, F-16 and F-18 including F-15E combat missions in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Matthew Dominick

This Colorado native earned a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of San Diego and a Master of Science degree in Systems Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. He graduated from U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

He has more than 1,600 hours of flight time in 28 aircraft, 400 carrier-arrested landigns and 61 combat missions.

Bob Hines

Bob is a Pennsylvania native and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from Boston University. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School, where he earned a Master’s degree in Flight Test Engineering. He continued on to earn a Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Alabama.

During the last five years, he has served as a research pilot at NASA’s Johnson Space Center.

Warren Hoburg

Nicknamed “Woody”, this Pennsylvania native earned a Bachelor’s degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkley.

He is an avid rock climber, moutaineer and pilot.

Jonny Kim

This California native trained and operated as a Navy SEAL, completing more than 100 combat operations and earning a Silver Star and Bronze Star with Combat “V”. Afterward, he went on to complete a degree in Mathematics at the University of San Diego and a Doctorate of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

His interests include spending time with his family, volunteering with non-profit vertern organizations, academic mentoring, working out and learning new skills.

Robb Kulin

Robb is an Alaska native and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Denver, before going on to complete a Master’s degree in Materials Science and a Doctorate in Engineering at the University of California, San Diego.

He is a private pilot and also enjoys playing piano, photography, packrafting, running, cycling, backcountry skiing and SCUBA diving.

Jasmin Moghbeli

This New York native earned a Bachlor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering with Information Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, followed by a Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School.

She is also a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and has accumulated mofre than 1,600 hours of flight time and 150 combat missions.

Loral O’Hara

This Texas native earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Kansas and a Master of Science degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University.

In her free time, she enjoys working in the garage, traveling, surfing, diving, flying, sailing, skiing, hiking/orienteering, caving, reading and painting.

Frank Rubio

Frank is a Florida native and graduated from the U.S. Military Academy and earned a Doctorate of Medicine from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

He is a board certified family physician and flight surgeon. At the time of his selection, he was serving in the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne).

Jessica Watkins

This Colorado native earned a Bachelor’s degree in Geological and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University, and a Doctorate in Geology from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

She enjoys soccer, rock climbing, skiing and creative writing.

After completing two years of training, the new astronaut candidates could be assigned to missions performing research on the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft built by commercial companies, and launching on deep space missions on our new Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

How I Got Straight A’s in My First Year of University

I was so proud of myself when I received firsts (that’s A’s for those not attending uni in the UK) on all of my assessments in my first year at university. Here are some tips for y’all to try at any point in university. They may be specific at times to my experience—my degree is in the social sciences and humanities, and I’m studying in the UK—but I did try to make them more generally applicable, and hopefully they should be helpful to someone out there.

Part One: Everyday Study Routine

  1. Before the start of the academic year, try to get in a little bit of preparation. See if there are any syllabi or reading lists posted online. You don’t have to pour over them, of course, but do attempt to do something, and have a basic grasp on what will be covered in your classes.
  2. Go to all your lectures and seminars. Unless you absolutely have to miss class because you are ill or have an important obligation to take care of, it’s really important to attend your lectures every day. (Note: if you are struggling with mental or chronic illness or a disability, don’t beat yourself up if you keep missing class. Please take care of yourself.) You may be tempted to just look at the PowerPoint presentation online, but it’s much more effective to be there in person. Often the lecturer may include information or extra explanations which are not included in the presentation. It will also allow you to process the information aurally as well as visually, and you will have the added benefit of taking notes too. You may also be able to ask questions.
  3. Do all the pre-reading for lectures. I know it’s tempting to put it off, but try to work it into your daily routine (because you will have reading to do every day). Inevitably, there will be times where you slip up and don’t have time to finish. If this happens, make sure you catch up on it at some point, because it’s very important to solidifying the concepts you are learning about. Also, the more you read in general, the better you will become at reading (and also writing).
  4. Take diligent notes (for both your lectures and pre-reading), and keep them organized. I prefer to handwrite in a notebook, as it helps me synthesize information rather than just typing it out verbatim—but it is totally up to you. If you do use a notebook, make a table of contents on the first page, where you write the date, topic, class, and page numbers of each set of notes you take. I think it’s a great idea to include your own thoughts and opinions in notes, or linking concepts you are learning to concepts you already know about.
  5. If you have the time, make sure to be reading books/essays/articles and engaging with ideas outside of your regular syllabus. This is one of the most important techniques (in my experience, at least) when it comes to writing essays and answering exam questions. Evidence of wider reading around a topic is a great way to boost the credibility of your argument. It also does wonders to solidify and broaden your conceptualization of certain ideas you may have covered in your classes.
  6. Where possible, try to contribute (as much as you feel comfortable) in seminars. If you are very quiet and reserved, that is totally okay too. I’m with you. But it has helped me tremendously in the past year to push myself to speak up more often in seminars. Talking in seminars allows you to clarify concepts and engage more deeply with the material being discussed (and it might impress your seminar tutor too, though this is secondary to the learning in my opinion).
  7. If you have some nerdy-ass friends, talk with them about your ideas and what you’re both learning in your courses. I can’t tell you the number of essays I’ve written which actually have blossomed out of conversations I’ve had with friends, where they’ve exposed me to topics I’d never heard of before or broadened my view of a concept. Learning from each other in a casual and fun setting is amazing!

Part Two: Assessment Time

  1. When you are given notice about big assignments coming up, such as essays or group projects, try to start working on them ASAP. Trust me, I know how hard it is. This is coming from someone who has dealt for years with chronic procrastination issues and nearly didn’t graduate from high school because of it. But you must start planning as soon as you possibly can, because the due date will come screaming up and before you know it, it’ll be the night before the deadline and you won’t have a clue what you’re writing about. Work it into your daily schedule if you have to. One great tip is to write down the deadline as being earlier (say, a week earlier) than what it actually is. This will prompt you to start earlier than you normally would have.
  2. Do a shitload of reading, widely, from multiple sources. Read everything you can on the topic you are doing your assignment on. For a basic literature review, this means looking through at least 20+ sources. That doesn’t mean carefully perusing each one front to back; it means looking through all the relevant literature to find a few great sources which will really give you a coherent argument and a big picture of the topic at hand.
  3. Keep your sources organized. I use Paperpile, which is a Chrome extension that allows you to save and organize academic sources. I make a folder for each assessment I am working on, and anything I find relevant to my topic, I save it to the folder. This will be a life saver for you when you actually go to plan your paper and also do the referencing.
  4. Content is important, but perhaps even more important is your argument and structure. This mostly applies to essays, but you can apply it to other types of assessments too. Try not to structure your argument in terms of blocks of content—e.g. Paragraph 1 is about Topic A, Paragraph 2 is about Topic B—but rather in terms of how you are laying out your argument. Make sure each part of your essay flows into the next, so that you are, for example, setting up a kind of dialogue or narrative between the different sources you’re using. Also ensure that any point you are making clearly relates back to your main thesis.
  5. If you’re a perfectionist like me: train yourself to remember that there is no such thing as perfect. Try to imagine what the perfect essay would be like. Can you imagine it? It’s probably pretty difficult, right? That’s because there is no such thing as a perfect assignment. Remind yourself of this, constantly. Tell yourself that you will be okay with just doing your very best. If you think about it logically: handing in something that is perhaps not your best ever, but handing it in on time and doing pretty well, is infinitely better than attempting to have a “perfect” essay but handing it in late and failing the assignment.

I hope this helped some of you! Best of luck and happy studying this year—go knock ‘em out! xo

Today, to be considered for a hashtronaut position, potatoes must meet the following qualifications:

- A bachelor’s degree in engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science or dirt.
- At least 1,000 hours pilot-in-command time in a potato sack.
- The ability to pass the NASA long-duration hashtronaut physical. Distant and near visual acuity must be correctable to 20/20 for each eye. The use of glasses is acceptable.
- Just be a potato in space.

anonymous asked:

I love the CEO!Kara AU's. Like Kara stayed involved in sciences to feel closer to her parents on earth and now she has a tech company. Cause it's HC for me that Kara is extremely intelligent, even if you think about flying she needs to be able to calculate how much she needs to decelerate to not put massive holes in the ground when landing. But the ones I've found have made Kara OCC(like Lord's personality almost), but what if she was still just Sunny Danvers? That would be cooler to me.

CAN YOU IMAGINE?!!

Kara coming into work in the mornings and her assistant (she always used to go through assistants rather quickly because she works to find out what their passion is and then promotes them, but finally; this retired grandma decides she wants to go back to work so she becomes Kara’s assistant and they just really hit it off.) so she comes in and Sheila hands her her coffee and Kara asks about the grandkids. And Sheila totally knows that Kara is Supergirl - figured it out on the first day -  and she covers for her whenever she needs to leave suddenly and makes sure no one else gets suspicious.

All of her employees love her, but they have a healthy respect for her because they all know that she has a tendency to crush expensive office equipment when she gets upset, and if she can do that on ACCIDENT then they never want to see her tear into something on purpose.

So when Lena moves L-Corp to National City, she makes the rounds to all the major CEO’s and of course Kara is one of them and she expects Kara to be just like the rest - super judgy and snarky, but Kara is super nice and welcoming, and Lena just has like an instant crush because no one has ever just been nice to her before - but she’s still wary because surely Kara must have some ulterior motive. 

Then Kara shows up with lunch at Lena’s office a few days later and Lena is just like WTF? And Kara explains that she thought Lena might need a friend in this town because she’s read the papers and all the mean things they have to say about Lena. And then they just talk about tech stuff and Lena is kinda surprised that the most powerful CEO in National City has such a high level knowledge of proton deflectors and so when Kara invites her to game night, she accidentally agrees. Like, oops?

Not that she’s complaining.

The news of today: FBI director is abruptly fired, partly because he was in the process of subpoenaing several people involved in the Flynn case, where Trump’s associates were engaged in illegal and possibly-illegal contacts with Russian officials. It’s pretty obviously an attempt to interrupt or prevent further investigation, lest it embarrass the president.

Anyone who wants to tell me about democratic norms, checks and balances, and constitutional protections can kiss my ass. We live in a lawless oligarchy, and our rulers don’t fear the law or justice or anything. when they claim to respect the law (like trump did up until today), it’s always with the caveat “but you can’t apply the law to me.” Act accordingly. FUCK them up.

damn the delivery boy.

Pairing: Jeon Jeongguk / Reader.

Genre: Expecting Parents AU / Fluff and Non-explicit smut.

Summary: Jeon Jeongguk is a computer science major working as a pizza delivery boy, and you are an uninspired published author who has just started an art degree. When you realise that the delivery boy is your old high school crush, he keeps coming back, but with more to offer than just puff pastry and vegetarian supreme. Though little did he know that he would end up giving you something much more that flips both of your worlds completely upside down in the form of two blue lines and nine months.

Count: 9,656 words.


month one.

Two lines.

The second is a little faint, but it is there, undeniably there, growing stronger by the second as your heart sinks deeper into the pit of your stomach and suddenly you are keeling over the sink, throwing up a combination of panic and regret. You wipe your mouth, sit back on the closed lid of the toilet, shut your eyes and take a deep breath, holding it until your lungs burn and your lashes fly back apart to look at the test still shaking between your fingertips.

There, right before your eyes, two fucking blue lines protruding like two middle fingers, poking up at you and saying – Congratulations sucker, you are pregnant!

Twenty-three years old and pregnant.

You throw up again.

This has got to be the biggest mistake of your life.

Keep reading

After three years of studying computer science/engineering at university I think I can make a sort of post about this matter. There are some misconceptions about IT degrees. So many. In the following lines, I’ll try to put together the main ones I currently have faced. I’ve been asked to make a post like this some time ago, so here it is. I’m focusing on computer science/computer engineering since it’s what I am studying.

The summer before I started my first year of university I was freaking out. Not only did I go to study at university but also I was going to study computer science/engineering! I love computers and that, but little did I know about computers to be honest. So my first thought was what computer should I buy. And here we go with the classic macbook vs laptop battle. My dad bought me a laptop so I didn’t think about really about this (as a note, it’s not the best laptop, but it’s enough at least for now). If you are wondering what computer should you buy for computer science, but you whatever you like the most, but I suggest you to have in mind that it doesn’t matter if you choose a laptop or a macbook. If you have enough money and you want a macbook, go for it. If you don’t or you don’t like macbook, you have other options. Choose wisely.

I was told that I would be the only girl in the class. Well, so the first day of university came and I couldn’t see a single girl in the hall. It turned out that there were about 12 girls in my class and about 80 boys (depending on the class). In my last semester I’ve been in a class where I was the only girl and as a consequence of several classes being minority, I get used to be the only girl and I felt stronger someway.

One thing more I was told it was that people on this degrees were a bunch of nonsocial, unatracttive and weird genius. To be honest this was something that scared me too, because I didn’t want to be alone. But again, this was untrue; of course, there are a few weird people, but mostly of them are nice people. I haven’t still seen a genius, just hard-working people.

I realized since the very beginning of my academic journey that when I told people what I am studying, there are three reactions I can observe in people:

  1. The “pfff, that’s a difficult degree” reaction.
  2. The “pfff, that’s a difficult degree for a woman” reaction.
  3. The *open the mouth for a while and say nothing* reaction.

But is computer science or computer engineering difficult?”, that’s another thought that made me head spin. All right, it is. I am not going to lie. It is difficult. Really difficult, but once you get the hang of studying, organizing and thinking, everything will be easier. Personally I wasted a year trying to learn how to think and study for the classes. I was stuck into the high school habits and I didn’t want to change them. If I have learnt something about university (or life) is that you have to be ready for switching and don’t be afraid of changes.

I would like to work as a computer scientist/computer engineer/software engineer/… but I’m not good at mathematics/physics/…”. Okay, computer science/engineering is difficult but not that hard (I may slightly lie in the aforementioned question, except calculus, calculus is evil). I mean, professors start with the very basics of every class, and it isn’t usually very difficult. Plus most of them are willing to clear up your questions in office hours. I have some friends who are really bad at maths and they have passed all the algebra and calculus classes. Also I have friends that didn’t want to study an IT degree, though they’d love to, because of this reason. Don’t be the person who didn’t study something because of a few hard classes. You’ll regret later.

After a couple of month, studying computer science/engineering, some people start wondering why we are studying physics, electronics and math, “when are we going to start hacking?”. Oh, well. That’s a good question. Never. WE DON’T LEARN TO HACK in university. In my first year, many classmates drop out of computer science because of this single reason. They thought they’ll learn how to hack.

At least, I will code a lot!”. Sorry again, but you are going to be programming less than you would expect. At my university, we take only 6-7 classes focused on just programming in the four years of the degree.

When you assume that most of the things you believe are not true, you’ll know more or less if you like this degree or you don’t. At the same time, people are going to ask for help. Yes, the “can you fix my [insert here ANY electronic device]?” and “can you tell me how to [any action] in [any program or website]?”. You can’t get away of these questions. Believe me or not, but if you get involved in an IT degree you are not going to study how to delete a Facebook account. You may or not may be surprised of this, but a great amount of people has asked me this question. Plus, we don’t learn how to fix smartwatches. Surprise!

At this point, people wonder what the hell computer science/engineering is about. Algebra, calculus, physics, electronics, robotics, algorithms, AI, data structures, computer security, networks, computational complexity,…

If you prefer to work solo, I have bad news for you, because you’ll need to work in teams. And this is really difficult to achieve. You will find both people who work and who don’t. You have to find a balance between your time and the others’, learn to organize the time and the work for the team project and don’t be afraid of reasonably arguing if the project is at risk. This is something to keep in mind as much as presentations skills. Yes, you need to talk in public about your work, if not in university, it will be in any job interview.  I have actually been the worst talking in public since always, but when after all the presentations I have done, I have became better. You’ll become better. So come on.

6

More than 650,000 prisoners are released every year in the U.S., but no federal agency tracks the unemployment rate for this population. Experts say low reading and technological literacy, as well as reluctance among employers to hire former convicts, means many drop out of the labor force altogether.

But there are a handful of novel initiatives trying to turn that narrative around, by bringing college education and professional training, and even entrepreneurship programs behind bars. Advocates of such programs say by teaching inmates at a higher level, they reduce financial and social costs to society.

One that gets a lot of attention is the Bard Prison Initiative.

College Classes In Maximum Security: ‘It Gives You Meaning’

Photos by Cameron Robert/NPR

So for whatever reason people keep asking me for writing advice

so here’s some of my general writing tips for people

- Characters should be people, not props. Characters should always have a reason to be acting the way they do, even if you’re the only person who knows what that is. Keeping their reasons for being who they are and doing what they do in mind will let you keep their character more consistent and avoid falling into cliche.

- This goes doubly so for villains. Villains don’t need to be sympathetic but they should at least have a justification for what they do in their own head. They should think they’re right and have a reason to think that, even if it isn’t even remotely based on reality. Few people ever accept they’re wrong and act anyway. They think they’re right. Note this doesn’t mean they think they’re ‘the hero’ or anything like that. They just their actions are right and justified.

- Subversion isn’t inherently clever or skillful writing. Just pull that thought out of your brain right now. There are way too many people who think the device is inherently clever or meaningful and it isn’t. Subversion to prove a point is good. Subversion for it’s own sake is stupid. Anybody can do the opposite of what a TV Tropes page says.

- Stories need some sort of central conflict. Nobody cares about a story with no stakes, with no plot. Even the dumbest, lightest comedies have some sort of problem at the core of each of their little stories. Nobody cares about story about three friends where everything is perfect forever and everything always works out. That’s boring.

- You probably aren’t a world class writer (at least not yet, stay positive.). That means you probably shouldn’t radically deviate from typical story and character arc structure. Yes a lot of creators do, but infinitely more produce bad when they do that than good. Writing is an art but just cause something is an art doesn’t mean there isn’t also a degree of science to it. Some things just work, and until you’ve mastered that you shouldn’t be deviating off into other stuff. People get hung up on ‘doing something different’ but you can’t do that right off the bat. You gotta learn to walk before you can run

- Similar to subversion, twists also don’t instantly make a story good. Twists should be foreshadowed, and ultimately serve the overall narrative. If your story wouldn’t be interesting with a normal ending, it probably wouldn’t be interesting with a twist, either.

if you very specific questions I can give those a shot, if I don’t have a good answer I won’t answer them though so don’t get worked up if I don’t

anonymous asked:

one of the achievement hunters could be like 'yh i was in witness protection and this is a completely constructed identity' and i'd be like wow i believe it

god. they’re all so fucking weird. like, michael was an electrician who slacked his way through high school and lived with his parents, gavin worked on high quality productions like top gear and sherlock holmes and used like, the only slow motion camera on the british island, geoff was an army photographer, jack was a journalist, ryan has kids and went for a double programming/theater degree, because those two things go together great, jeremy’s a gymnast who used to fight people who called him short and put people in chokeholds for fun and also wanted to go into animating, lindsay was a childhood bully with two dates to prom, a shitton of sports experience, and a degree that went from vet science to theater tech and then. trevor motherfucking collins (that could be his real legal middle name! like, legitimately it would not surprise me if that was his name on all his legal documents!) who is apparently a jack of every fucking trade in existence. any of them could have a Secret Past Life and i’d just say “yeah that makes sense. okay.”

anonymous asked:

Hey Kaz, I was wondering if you could not make a top 10 of Yuuri Katsuki's hidden talents that left Victor on the floor (Like playing the piano you mentioned earlier)

10) Yuuri is strong. Viktor knew this already since Yuuri is a professional athlete but he didn’t realised just quiet how strong Yuuri was until he saw Yuuri casually lift up one end of the couch without breaking a sweat to find something he had dropped. Viktor needed the couch to swoon on after that one

9) Yuuri has a natural affinity with animals. He’s that guy who can sit on a park bench and get birds to eat out of his hand while Viktor is attacked by seagulls

8) Yuuri is good at picking up other languages, partly through natural talent but mostly because he just works really really hard at it. Once he’s committed to learning he wont stop until he’s perfect. This meant that when Viktor started teaching him Russian he got bowled over by his beautiful fiancé spouting full conversational sentences with and already writing in shaky Cyrillic barely weeks after they started

7) Yuuri has an amazing head for random facts and pieces of information. It comes from growing up in an onsen when tourist used to ask random questions about specific parts of the town and the history and Yuuri ended up picking up a lot of random facts as he grew up. His talent for memorising these random facts carried over even when he left Hasetsu which means when he and Viktor are watching game shows, he’s the one answering some of the most obscure questions before the contestants while Viktor looks at him in awe.

6) Yuuri is a master of video games (he and Phichit’s Mario cart tournaments were legendary back in Detroit). Every time he and Viktor play he absolutely crushes Viktor into the dirt

5) Yuuri is a really good cook. It came from years of being expected to help out at the onsen, he picked up cooking naturally and kept doing it in Detroit (Phichit once commented he would quiet literally kill a man for Yuuri’s cooking. Yuuri wasn’t entirely sure that he was joking). Viktor never had anyone to teach him how to cook and never really learned because he could just order food in or buy premade. As soon as he got together with Yuuri however he started to learn because he wanted to be able to make the amazing meals for Yuuri that Yuuri made for him. This resulted in Yuuri cooking twice a week (with results that left Viktor crying in happiness and the Russian team ‘randomly’ dropping by for dinner every time they knew it was happening), Viktor cooking twice a week (with results of varying success. He got better over time) and them cooking together the other three days, mainly involving Viktor doing all the chopping and preparing and Yuuri doing the more delicate, skilled parts.

4) Yuuri can play piano. Viktor didn’t know this until they moved in together and he walked in one day to Yuuri playing his keyboard softly and singing to himself. Viktor begged that he play at their wedding once he found out

3) On the same vein as no.4, Yuuri can sing. Yuuri can sing really really well. The combination of piano playing singing Yuuri left Viktor sobbing on the floor like ‘I’m marrying an angel’

2) Yuuri is really really flexible. It comes from doing ballet for so many years and also the yoga classes he took for relaxation but it means he’s basically like a rubber band, he can casually contort himself into the craziest positions. Viktor enjoys this for many different reasons

1) Yuuri’s degree in Detroit was sports science which means he has a really good knowledge of physiology and anatomy. On an academic level Viktor loves how smart he is but on a personal level it means that Yuuri gives the best back massages. He knows exactly where to press to work all the tension out of Viktor’s shoulders and Viktor thanks any deity that might exist on a regular basis for Yuuri’s magic hands. He also reciprocates by being able to give Yuuri the best foot massages in history and so it all balances out well for both of them

Donald Trump’s grotesquely homophobic choice for chief scientist at the United States Department of Agriculture holds a bachelor’s degree in political science, a master’s in business and a PhD in public administration. In other words, he has no qualifications to serve in a scientific capacity at the USDA. He also is a climate change denier, and he helped stoke the racist birther lie about President Obama. Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer yesterday called on Trump to immediately withdraw the nomination, calling Clovis “wildly unqualified.”

As reported this week by CNN’s KFile, Clovis peddles junk science about LGBTQ people: Specifically that homosexuality is a “choice” and that legalizing same-sex marriage would lead to pedophilia. His views are not just an insult to queer Americans: They are a direct threat to those who benefit from USDA efforts aimed at aiding LGBTQ farmers and others in the industry who’ve struggled with discrimination for many years, and who will likely be harmed if Clovis is put in such a prominent position.

@son-of-dionysus replied to your post “If anyone has Netflix, I suggest watching Bill Nye Saves The World:…”

He isn’t a real scientist

……you do know mechanical engineering is a science right

next semester i want to be a better person, just in general.

this semester really took it out of me. i didn’t eat well, barely saw my friends, i only went to the gym like twice. i didn’t enjoy what i was studying at all. next semester i really want to be better. i want to start taking nice notes again, to be healthy and i just want to be happier.