defeated-hero

You are the super villain that defeated the super hero and conquered the earth. You walk out onto your balcony to law down the law for your new subjects. You are greeted by a massive crowd and genuine cheers.

The 15 PLOT POINTS of Story Structure

To all the writers who have ever been told they need to outline their story, and privately thought “Great. But how do you DO that? What exactly does that mean?! Is there a map? WHAT IS THE SPECIFIC DEFINITION OF THE VAGUE WORD ‘OUTLINE’?”

Good news. Stories have structure. Structure that can be learned. And a fantastic place to start learning structure? 

Save the Cat: The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need by Blake Snyder. This book gives a simple outline that most stories follow. And as an introduction to story structure, it can’t be beat. 

In Save the Cat, 15 plot points are spelled out in something called a beat sheet. During the outlining process, these “beats” or plot points can be used as an armature or skeleton that your story is built upon. 

So what are those 15 plot points?

Opening Image: A snapshot of the hero’s problematic ordinary world, right before the story starts and changes everything. 

Set-Up: Further establishing that ordinary world and what the hero does every day, impressing upon the audience or reader what’s wrong, and the idea that something needs to change.

Theme Stated:  The truth that the hero will learn by experiencing the story, the statement that will be proven to the audience. But upon first encountering this truth, in this story beat right in the beginning, the hero doesn’t understand or outright refuses to believe it. The theme stated is asking a question, a question which the story will answer.

Catalyst: The ordinary world is shattered. Something unexpected happens, and this event triggers all the conflict and change of the whole story. Life will never be the same after this moment. This is the Call to Adventure. 

Debate: But for a moment, the hero won’t be quite sure about answering that call. Leaving behind the ordinary world is difficult – even if the catalyst has come along and disrupted everything – because the ordinary means safety, it means not being challenged, it means avoiding conflict and heartache. Yes, that existence they’re stuck in might be stagnant and unpleasant, but it protects them from facing the intimidating task of growth, of becoming something better.

Break Into 2: And this is when the hero decides to answer the call and cross the threshold of act two, determined to pursue their goal. 

B Story: This is when the relationship – which usually carries and proves the theme – starts in earnest.

Fun & Games: This is just what it says: the premise promised a certain type of pure entertainment, and this beat is where we get to experience it fully. 

Midpoint: This is either a false victory or a false defeat. Something really really good happens. Or something the exact opposite.

Bad Guys Close In: Forces of opposition and conflict begin to converge on the hero and his goal. Everything begins to fall apart for the hero, the defeats piling up one after another, the main character punching back.  

All Is Lost: This is the sequence where absolutely everything falls apart for the hero. The plans fail, the goal is lost, the mentor dies, the villain wins. All is, quite literally, lost. 

Dark Night of the Soul: The hero’s bleakest moment is right here. In addition to all of the tangible things that have been lost, hope and the gumption to continue with the story have also vanished. There is usually a hint of death here, of some kind. An actual death, or an emotional or spiritual death. 

Break into 3: Ah, but there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Inspiration occurs, hope is rekindled, courage to pursue the story returns. Usually, this is the moment where the main character learns what they NEED, the truth which will heal them, and allow them to fix their own lives. With this, they are able to snatch victory from defeat.

Finale: And in here, the story goal is pursued once more, but this time from the stronger version of the hero – the version that has learned the theme, and committed to act accordingly. 

Closing Image: The opposite of the opening image. This is a snapshot of life after the story, the problems of the ordinary world solved or banished, a new world opening up for the hero. If the opening is the equivalent of “once upon a time” this is saying “And every day after … “ 

So let’s see how that works! And to see it, let’s look at my favorite short film of all time – Paperman  (because this gave me an excuse to watch it several times and listen to the music while writing it.)

1) Opening Image

We see George, a twenty-something in a sixty-something’s suit and tie, obviously on his way to work, and not looking at all enthused about it. He stares straight ahead, expression bored, lifeless, right on the edge of depressed. Wind from a passing train pushes him slightly, and he lets it, demeanor unchanging. 

2) Set-Up

But then a sheet of paper, caught on the wind, hits his shoulder. The paper flies off again, and a young woman appears onscreen, chasing after the paper, as the surprised George watches.

 After catching it offscreen, the girl returns, tucking the paper into the stack she carries, smiling slightly. They both face forward, waiting for the train side-by-side, in silence. She’s glancing sideways at him, he’s smiling and fidgeting nervously, but still resolutely facing forward; they’re both aware of each other, seemingly hoping the other will be braver, but neither able to overcome their shyness and the unspoken rules of everyday life. 

3) Theme Stated 

As a train charges into the station, a paper from George’s stack is snatched by the wind and lands flat on the woman’s face. When he pulls the paper away, she laughs: her lipstick left a perfect kiss mark on the sheet. When George spots it, he laughs too … 

but when he opens his eyes, she’s gone. She’s boarded a different train. The kiss-mark paper flaps in the wind as the train begins to move, taking her away. He watches, crestfallen. She glances back. Looks of regret and disappointment are exchanged, both a little wistful. The paper, the symbol of their fleeting memorable meeting, waves goodbye. 

Through this little sequence of images, the question of the whole story is asked: Was there a connection between them? Will they find each other again? And on a wider level: What does it take to find love? 

Further Set-Up:

And cut to George behind a desk, in a gray office, dark file cabinets towering behind him, clocks on the wall ticking away his life. Miserable again, he stares at the lipsticked paper. A stack of documents slams onto the desk from on high. The grim-faced boss of the office scowls down at him. George frowns at the stack, then at his boss, who stomps away.   

4) Catalyst 

Breeze pulls the kissed paper off his desk and out the open window. He catches it just in time, breathing a sigh of relief. And then he sees something. The girl! She’s there! She’s right across the street! 

5) Debate 

He needs to get her attention! He dithers for a moment, then throws the window wide and enthusiastically waves his arms.

 An ominous "ahem” from the boss brings him back inside, and back to his desk. But his attention is still on the girl, and the need to get her attention. He folds a paper airplane, stands before the window, poises the airplane to fly … but he glances at his boss’s office before he throws it. Should he? 

6) Break Into Act 2

Yes. Yes, he should. He sends the little airplane messenger to bridge the distance between himself and the girl. 

7) B Story

What he should have done while waiting for the train, he’s committed to do now. Talk to her. The relationship of the story has started officially. 

8) Fun & Games

In this moment, he becomes the “paper man” of the title. He folds and throws paper airplane after paper airplane. The boss shows up, shoves him back and slams his window. George pauses until he’s gone, then just keeps sending airplanes. They sail over the street, but are intercepted or miss their mark every time. 

9) Midpoint

He reaches for more paper … and knocks an empty tray off the desk. He’s run out. Except for one paper, the kissed one, the only one he’s held onto. With a determined look, he folds it precisely into an airplane, stands before the window, breathes to steady himself … 

And the wind steals the airplane from his hand, sending it spiraling to the street below, George reaching out pointlessly. On top of this defeat, the girl leaves the office.  

10) Bad Guys Close In 

Immediately, the boss emerges from his lair. The other office workers hurriedly return to their scribbling, hunched to avoid drawing attention. The girl is leaving the building across the street! George turns from the window … and finds the boss looming above him, glowering, delivering another tall pile of meaningless work. 

George sinks into his chair, defeated. But something happens as he watches his boss walk away, as he sees the office workers in neat rows; all of them older versions of George, reflections of what he will become … if he doesn’t do something right now. 

He runs, sending paper from the perfect stacks flying in his wake. 

11) All Is Lost

But when he escapes the building, and attempts to cross the street, cars nearly kill him. And when he finally makes it to the opposite sidewalk, the girl is nowhere in sight. She’s lost again. 

And all he manages to find is the little traitorous paper airplane. The paper he’d believed might mean something, might have signified something important and maybe a little magical. Which it obviously never did. 

12) Dark Night of the Soul

Angry, he grabs the plane and throws it with all his strength.  He’s lost his job, he’s lost the girl, he’s lost all faith in the magic he’d just started to believe might be real. He stomps towards the train station, returning home. 

13) Break Into 3  

But fate has other plans. The airplane glides over the city, almost supernaturally graceful and purposeful. It dives between buildings, and lands in the middle of the alley where all the paper planes have collected. 

It sits immobile. Then it moves. Moves again. And jumps into flight. The airplane flies over the rest, stirring them into motion, into the air. In a place where not even a breath of wind could reach, there is now a whirlwind of George’s airplanes. 

Though the forces of mediocrity tried to keep them apart, something greater has recognized George’s efforts and is going to see things through. 

14) Finale

A parade of airplanes follows George down the street. 

The leader attaches to his leg. He brushes it off, mad. A flurry of them attach to him, then carry him down the street, unfazed by his fighting. 

The leader airplane rockets over the city purposefully, finds the girl, then lures her to follow.

 She chases after. 

Somewhere else in the city, George is being pushed wherever the paper airplanes want him to go. We switch back and forth between George and the girl, as the airplanes push him and beckon her. 

Until they’re both on different trains, which stop simultaneously, on opposite sides of the platform. The girl gets out. She fiddles with the airplane, like she’s trying to get it to work again. And just then, a breeze brings hundreds of paper planes skittering all around the platform.

 She looks up …

15) Closing Image

And there’s George, covered in paper planes. 

He lurches towards Meg, and the airplanes falls away, their work done. 

George and Meg face each other, smiling, the barriers of routine and shyness overcome. Exactly what should have happened, exactly what was meant to happen. Putting effort into connection and love prevailed in the end, defeating the allure of life spent in safety and mediocrity. The closing image is the opposite of the opening: he’s not alone, he’s not facing the train leading to his mundane job, he’s not looking miserable and hopeless. He’s facing the girl, his bright and meaningful new future.

***

So! Those are the 15 plot points. This is a fantastic way to begin learning what story structure is, why it works the way it does, and how to precisely pull it off. 

For a more in-depth explanation, I highly recommend picking up a copy of Save the Cat. (It holds a special place in my heart; it was the first screenwriting book I ever read, and started obsessive study of storytelling.)

Everybody has experienced the defeat of their lives. Nobody has a life that worked out the way they wanted it to work out. We all begin as the hero of our own dramas, in centre stage, and inevitably life moves us out of centre stage, defeats the hero, overturns the plot and the strategy and we’re left on the sidelines, wondering why we no longer have a part, or want a part, in the whole damn thing. So everybody’s experienced this. When it’s presented to us sweetly, the feeling goes from heart to heart and we feel less isolated and we feel part of the great human chain, which is really involved with the recognition of defeat.
—  Leonard Cohen on why people enjoy listening to melancholy songs. From a BBC radio interview in 2007.
Writing: The Villain

In most stories, there is a tangible villain that works at every opportunity to stop your hero from reaching their goal. They are oftentimes the epitome of evil and hatred, depending on how extremely their villainy runs. In many ways, they are almost as important as the main character, so here are some tips on developing them well.

  • Villains should be handled with the same deep thought as heroes.
    • Just because they’re the villain doesn’t mean they aren’t a very major character, and complex characters are always more favorable than simple, boring characters. Develop their appearance and personality in detail. Formulate a backstory. Understand the motivations behind what they do, and let their actions reflect their internal desires.
  • Find ways to make your villain stand out from other villains.
    • Most villains are maniacal. They are almost all willing to do terrible things in order to get what they want. A lot of villains are related to their character in some way, and sometimes this relationship is revealed in a plot twist. These are all well and good, but trying to make these ideas seem fresh and interesting is difficult nowadays. Play with your ideas and tweak these tropes, or maybe even disregard them all together. Do what you can to make your villain not sound like another Voldemort or Darth Vader. (Reading your work and/or having others read your work is a good way to see if your villain (and other characters, too) are interesting and unique enough.)
  • Consider that your villain is (probably) still human.
    • Even if they aren’t human in the technical sense, they probably still have human emotions. Give your character depth by exploring their sense of morality and where they came from. Why do they think what they’re doing is acceptable. Do they think it’s acceptable? What happened that lead them up to this point of villainy?
  • Explore your villain’s relationship with the other characters.
    • Are they closely connected with your hero and the hero’s friends? Are they in no way related? What did the good characters do to get on the villain’s bad side? How deep does your villain’s anger or hatred for your hero run? Do they hate them at all, or are they doing what they’re doing for another reason? Are the things that your villain is doing a direct result of the hero’s actions, or was there another cause?
  • Decide what the end result of the villain’s actions will be.
    • You have one of two very basic routes this can take: your villain can either defeat or be defeated by the hero. The hero also has one of two routes (if they defeat the villain): they can defeat them by force and kill/imprison/etc. them, or they can “convert” them to the good side. How will this decision affect your villain? How will it affect the overall story? How will it affect the other characters? What will the long-term effects be?
  • Their motivations must be believable.
    • Too often the villain comes off as cheesy or unsatisfying because there doesn’t seem to be a good reason for them to be acting against the main character. Their actions and motivations should be just as definitive and interesting as any other character’s. Try to avoid falling into the trap of “sworn revenge” for no good reason–or, even worse, copping out by saying the villain is “just crazy”.
  • People: Kirishima's past looks heavy and obscure... MAYBE HE'S THE U.A. TRAITOR????????
  • Me: NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE
  • Horikoshi: In fact, Kirishima was just a nice guy in general with self-esteem issues who tried fighting bullies and was always outshined by Ashido.
  • Me: The evil is defeated.
In case you’re still struggling with the concept of “wow, what’s so bad about the crossover”

Earth-X is an alternative reality where the Nazis won. Earth-X is a place where all Jewish and Roma people have been murdered. All. This concept in itself is anti-Semitic and anti-Roma and it doesn’t fucking matter that “hey, it’s been comics canon for fourty years!!” bc hey, guess what! It was anti-Semitic and anti-Roma garbage even then.

The CW has already gotten criticism (probably much less than they deserved for it) for The Ray, a cartoon that’s going to be set on Earth-X and where iconic, beloved superheroes such as Supergirl, The Flash and Arrow are Nazis. (It’s good to take note that at least two of these characters are heavily Jewish-coded themselves.) These same villains will now be the source of conflict in the Arrowverse crossover and provide the antagonist for our heroes to defeat.

I suppose the producers’ reasoning for picking this storyline was 1) hey, nothing better than having people punch some Nazis, amiright! 2) let’s promo The Ray while we’re at it! The latter is despicable, the first would be passable, maybe, under the right circumstances. Using Nazified versions of our favorite superheroes as generic villains are not these circumstances. I very much doubt that the CW will address what the whole “Nazis won WW2″ scenario actually means even on The Ray, let alone in a crossover where they have a plot to burn through and a mash of four casts to utilize. This enraging for multiple reasons: because the CW already has an incredibly bad track record when it comes to their Jewish characters, because Nazi villains as some generic antagonist instead of addressing the weight of what it actually means for these people to support and to be an active, instrumental part of a genocidal regime is absolutely vile and I shouldn’t even be explaining this to everyone but above all, because by using their fan-favorite actors for the portrayals of this characters they are at risk of turning the fans of these actors into Nazi sympathizers and if you think I’m joking, then just try and look up how many people have posted (mainly on twitter) about how excited and thrilled they are to see Melissa Benoist as Overgirl or Grant Gustin as the Nazi Flash, apparently entirely unbothered by the fact that they are literally fangirling Nazi characters.

Don’t support this. Don’t watch this. Flame the CW and their producers on whichever platform you prefer. 

The most important headcanon

Damian Wayne, without a doubt, would absolutely kill Donald Trump if given the opportunity. Just. Straight up snap his neck. No hesitation. No regrets. No mercy. Damian doesn’t even kill anymore, but Trump is the one exception because he’s just that awful. He’s already dead within the first five seconds of him entering the room. Bruce isn’t even mad. He gives Damian a puppy as a reward. Robin goes down in history as the great hero who defeated Trump. The entire country celebrates.

4

Found that a WW discussion led to Hawkdaddy revealing his thoughts on villains.

Basically:
Villains are villains because they’re a threat to the hero. If they have messy powers that aren’t stronger than the hero’s, they weren’t really a threat. If villains can only be defeated by the heroes outsmarting them, then it’s easier to see them as a threat than someone who can just be punched into submission.

Thoughts? I think relying strictly on physical abilities can lead to power creep shows like DBZ, in which case it’s difficult to keep topping itself. Finding chinks in an opponents powers gets you a show like JJBA, where even seemingly weak opponents can pose a threat if their abilities take advantage of the hero’s weakness, or even if they’re initially too clever to touch.

Novel Length | Stony Fic Recs

Long chaptered fics with delicious slow burn and world building. 

Last updated 4/2/2017.

Fics over 50k words.

Just before the events of Iron Man, a baby is left on Tony’s doorstep. He wants nothing to do with it at first, but his time in Afghanistan changes his mind and Tony vows to become a better man for his son’s sake.

Six years ago, without the Avengers Initiative there to save the day, scientist Dr. Eric Selvig sacrificed himself to save the world, the almighty demi-god Thor was lost to a terrible storm, and vigilante Iron Man – spotted with a nuclear weapon trying to take advantage of the situation – was forever labelled an enemy of SHIELD.

This is a comic book office AU, where Steve is defrosted a year too late, Thor has forgotten who he is, and no one knows Tony is Iron Man.

Also includes: office pranks, inappropriate post-it notes, and superheroes who like pina coladas and getting caught in the rain

Steven Rogers never wanted to be king, but he knows his duty, and he does it well. Lord Tony Stark, the king’s appointed consort, does his duty as well, even though he’d enjoy his duty more if it actually involved sleeping with the king. As it doesn’t, he’s just resigned. The war that made Steve king and cost him nearly everything may be over, but a meeting of old enemies might stir up some ghosts none of them are prepared for.

Steve Rogers has plenty of friends. He just doesn’t know two of them are the same man.

That’s just how Tony Stark/Iron Man likes it. Until he comes to regret it.

And Tony realizes that working out who the Winter Soldier used to be and who he is now are two entirely different things.

Soulmates have their first words to each other written on their wrists. This should make it easy. For Steve and Tony, it is anything but. Steve’s problem is that the future he has awoken into is nothing he was ever expecting: he has a soulmate now. Who might be a robot. And if his soulmate is Iron Man, how can he be so attracted to Tony Stark? It should be impossible. Tony’s problem is that he is Iron Man, his soulmate is a man whom he in no way deserves, and he is going to fight everything in his heart and do his best to make sure Steve never, ever finds out the whole truth.

A visit from a Reed Richards from a parallel world convinces Tony and Steve that they must do whatever they can to prevent their world from falling into Civil War. They can save the world…but at what cost to themselves?

After a tragic accident, Steve is given a chance to go back in time and deliver a warning to Tony in the hope of avoiding their fate. Something’s gone wrong, though, because this is not his world he’s ended up in. And that is definitely not his Tony who’s planning to delete his own brain.

Sometimes your second chance isn’t at all what you were expecting.

Where Steve doesn’t quite die, ends up stranded in the multiverse and would quite like to know how the hell so many versions of himself ended up sleeping with Tony Stark. Well, that’s going to make things a tad awkward when he gets home.

Age of Ultron-based, but not entirely canon compliant. Written for the 2013 Cap-Iron Man Reverse Big Bang. Ultron has attacked, obliterating most of the world’s superheroes and resistance in a matter of hours. The remaining heroes band together and share what strength they have to get through it, to survive, and defeat Ultron once and for all. Steve Rogers grieves in the wake of the disaster and the heroes’ defeat, and no one knows if he will be able to provide the leadership they need–but Tony Stark isn’t about to let him slip away that easily.

When Tony and Steve’s son from the future, Jake Jensen, arrives at Avenger’s Tower, the two of them are forced to confront some hard truths: Tony that he might not actually become a horrible father, and Steve that he might not be able to set aside his discomfort with sharing a child with another man. When they both get a second chance at a first try at fatherhood, it’s up to the two of them to learn from their own future’s past.

Tony Stark spent his childhood making weapons, filling the hole his father left in the world when he succumbed to alcohol, grief, and his own demons. At the age of fifteen, he ran away from home, and made it as far as MIT before all of his responsibilities caught up to him. Now seventeen, he just wants to finish his degree and escape from everything connected to the Stark name.

Steve Rogers crashed into the icy North Atlantic in the 1940’s, sacrificing himself to save the world. He never expected to wake up, and now that he has, he’s not sure he’s glad. The US Army has other plans for him, but for now, Steve is slowly learning to live life in the 21st century, and taking classes at Boston College. He’s beginning to suspect that there is no escape.

Boston College is on the T’s Green Line. MIT is on the Red. The two lines meet at the Park Street Station, and so will Steve and Tony.

Tony goes to see Wanda, and suddenly Steve is alive and there are Skrulls! Or maybe Tony is just going crazy. Nothing happens in this fic, until the very end. Seriously. There’s a lot of talking, mostly at inopportune moments, Tony’s views on the acceptable gifts to give people are slightly different from everyone else’s and he spends more time than would seem necessary being (half-)naked. What else is new?

When Captain Steve Rogers wakes from an injury-induced coma, a lot has changed in the battle against the Kaiju. There are new Jaegers with new pilots, new advances in the study of the beasts, even new rules in the Shatterdome. It’s starting to seem like they’re finally ready to defeat the monsters once and for all, but first Steve must learn to get along with his new team of pilots. Especially the troublesome Tony Stark, who’s proving to be harder to deal with than the Kaiju problem itself.

A story of recovery. In a world without superheroes, Tony Stark, the disinherited son of a billionaire, goes to Afghanistan as an embedded media star, only to be held hostage for months until he’s rescued. During his recovery, his therapist Doctor Bruce Banner prescribes an unusual treatment; volunteer work at a rehab center. He meets an eclectic assembled group including a vet who thinks he’s Thor, a physical therapist who might be a spy, and an all American hero, Steve Rogers. It is Steve Rogers, the soldier in a coma, who captures his interest and, eventually, his heart.

Fics over 100k words

A series rewriting MCU verse, beginning with an alternate version of Iron Man 2, in which, instead of Natasha, Steve got assigned to help Tony while the genius was slowly dying of Palladium poisoning. Continues there in unfolding Steve’s and Tony’s journey through acceptance, trust, and eventually love.

Steve takes things like personal responsibility and respect seriously. Tony’s got people he pays to take care of that kind of thing, and anyway, he’s pretty sure that he’s going to die of some exotic disease in his workshop, because Dummy’s still a little spotty about what is ‘clean’ enough to put on an open wound. The rest of the Avengers are in this for personal gain, except for Clint, he just enjoys being a dick.And some things shouldn’t be a chore.

Tony Stark is Iron Man.

Before that, he was an man with bigger heart than brain. Before that, he was an asshole with a bigger mouth than sense. And before that, he was was a scared little boy. Not that it matters. Stark’s always have had iron in their backbone.

Tony has been held by Stane since his escape from Afghani terrorists, marked dead in the eyes of the world while Stane is free to use his mind, inventions, and company as he sees fit. Tony feels there’s nothing he can do and has resigned himself to death to save those he loves. That would be when JARVIS lets Captain America stumble into his old lab.

Steve has been wandering Avengers Mansion in the steps of a ghost, seeing empty spaces, and recurring oddities that mean nothing to anyone but him. He doesn’t know who left them, or why the ghost lingers. It isn’t even until he enters a dusty lab that things start to fall into place as he meets Anthony, a computer program named for its creator Anthony Stark.

There were days when the realization that he was someone’s father made Steve’s head hurt, but mostly he was grateful that he could trust his instincts, because apparently Peter was what had been missing from his life. Yes, he still had lingering, unresolved issues from his time in the Army, and sure, he had what Bucky annoyingly referred to as a criminally untapped ass, and no life outside of work and Peter, but Steve was okay with how his life had turned out because of trusting his instincts.

Unfortunately, those same instincts had straight up betrayed him by going absolutely haywire upon being exposed to Tony Stark.

Tony is a King with a surprising number of people out to kill him. Steve and the rest of the Avengers are fighting for Pierce’s rebellion and end up with Tony as their prisoner. Oops.

Basically one of those bodice-ripping romance novels I don’t read (ahem) but with far more gay.

A story of revolution.Captain Steve Rogers is just trying to pay off his debt to SHIELD, carting cargo from the Rim worlds to the Inner Belts in his bucket of bolts ship, the Howling Commando. He keeps a low profile and makes sure his crew is safe and happy. But the universe has a different plan for the once highly decorated Captain of the Honor Guard. The universe drops a Courtesan by the name of Tony Stark into his life. The Captain doesn’t like it, but Bucky convinces him that providing transport to the most elusive Courtesan in the Guild could be their ticket to freedom. His crew from the engineer with anger management issues to the pilot who may be a beautiful but deadly assassin wants him to take the commission. What ends up being a simple commission puts his crew in jeopardy and could change all of humanity, because the Courtesan is not really just a pretty face and the Captain of the Honor Guard can fall in love far too easily with a man of conviction - and Tony Stark is a man of conviction.

  • Newborn series by Ilerre | M | 109k | infidelity, body modification, read all warnings

It all started when they stopped trusting each other.

“Billionaire, genius, engineer, philanthropist, submissive.  Yeah, submissive.  Any questions?”

OR

Yet another BDSM-AU.  

So Jarvis is the one who pulls her up onto her feet, presses a tool into one hand and a book into the other and tells her to create. Tells her that if the numbers and the shapes and images in her mind hurt so bad then she should build them, should give them form so that they can finally leave her alone.

Jarvis is the one who finally teaches her how to breathe.

Or

Toni Stark grows up with the tale of Icarus swirling in the back of her mind. Instead of taking it as a precautionary tale about hubris and overreaching she decides it’s more about the limitations of wax.

Years later when she builds herself wings of her own she makes sure to build them out of better material.

He’s The Captain?

This was not good. This was so not good.

There were theories of course, of what The Captain would look like. Most followed the typical Hollywoodesque belief that he was some version of the Godfather, sitting in a dark room with a cigar, commanding his forces with a flick of his wrist. There were even some that even thought that The Captain was not one person, but a whole network of people with eyes and ears everywhere.

The blonde Adonis in front of him was definitely not what Tony was expecting.

Of course, in the end it didn’t matter.

There was a reason no one knew what The Captain looked like.

Because anyone who saw his face never lived to tell the tale.

  • Sins of Omission by Kiyaar | E | 155k - WIP | dark, torture, skrulls (be warned: this hasn’t been updated since 2013)

A Post-Civil War, Pre-Secret Invasion AU where Steve is dead, Tony’s a mess, and everything sucks.

In which Tony deals poorly with Steve’s death, falls off the wagon, sees ghosts, and misses a lot.

Oh, and the Skrulls are about to invade.

When an experiment goes awry, Tony thinks he may have found an answer to his problems and Steve faces something he’s been avoiding for a very long time.

Two men. Two worlds. Life during wartime. 

When Tony was a prince and Steve was his manservant, they were young and reckless and hopelessly in love. But an attack on Tony’s life convinces Steve that he can’t protect Tony, so he leaves in the dead of night to train until he can. Ten years later, Steve returns to the kingdom a strong and able knight, but his king is both furious and broken-hearted. 

Tony is no stranger to paternity claims from his female conquests, there’s a system in place for them. But when one of the tests actually comes back positive, he makes a rash decision to not tell anyone about it, not even Pepper Potts. All Mary Parker wants is for Tony to spend a little time with their son. Tony has a lot to think about in his life now, how he wants to run his company, how his life is going to change with the arc reactor, and what he’s going to do about his son, Peter. Then, the Avengers Initiative pops up, and in waltzes his childhood hero, and enemy, Captain America.

The adventures of Tony as a mutant; how he learned to accept himself and his subsequent growth into his own. Hijinks ensue.


i hold the ww movie so above any another ‘’superhero movie’’ bc honestly this shit is on another league  like in every superhero movie u got the bad guy whos sometimes human sometimes not and the hero gotta defeat them to save the people in the world right? but in wonder woman???? the villain is the people. people’s hatred, peoples abilitity to hurt, to kill, to be selfish, to be greedy, to be ugly. how we’re somehow all responsible for it. how does a hero behave when the same people she was supposed to protect are the ones actually causing all the bad in the world? it aint a generic hero x alien/maniac in which the hero wins, we go yayy and movie on with our lives. this movie is a truly revolutionary to the genre and its just beyond it tbfh

Theory on Y/N and Peter Pan

Whenever I want to read some Peter Pan imagines, I always end up disappointed because people tend to write Y/N as this innocent, naive, damsel in distress and sweet girl and that gets…on my….. nERVES. I am honestly so tired of this.

I don’t think that’s the kinda girl Peter would go for. Like, at all. Not that nice girls aren’t good characters. All in all, I just think this persona doesn’t fit in this particular situation.

Just imagine that:

- Y/N attacking Pan the first time she runs into him, because that’s the logic fucking reaction when you wake up in an unknown place and meet a creepy stranger who wiggles his eyebrows.

- Y/N not caring not having girl stuff on Neverland, or even privacy because when you’re in a tough situation you gotta toughen up, and survival tops comfort

- Y/N NOT playing the ‘mom’ with the Lost Boys, or cooking, or singing the boys to sleep for the sole reason that she is the only girl, bc that promotes gender roles and it goes against everything we girls fight for, DUH

- Y/N learning how to fight (good) and not stopping to annoy Felix and Pan until she gets private lessons, and accepting beng beaten to a pulp if that helps her improve and become able to take care of herself because depending on the boys to survive is humiliating for her and burdening for them.

- Y/N being confident and not taking the boys or Pan’s shit and talking back when they are rude.

- Y/N always not-so-gently reminding the boys (including Pan) that they ain’t a bunch of animals and they gotta behave and use their brains instead of their hands

- Y/N winning Peter’s respect BEFORE winning his heart, because she can stand up for herself and put him back in his place when he crosses a line or orders her around, and that’s what a healthy, long lasting relationhip is built on: respect. Repeat after me: R.E.S.P.E.C.T

- Y/N not blushing, or stuttering, or looking down. Y/N grinning and flirting and playfully teasing Peter whenever she gets the occasion just bc she can and it makes him lose his composure bc damn nobody else ever did this

- Y/N being a fucking badass who can kick ass and be feminine and be Peter’s equal because that’s the only kind of girl I can picture him with: someone who’s on the same level as him (maybe not on magical terms bc he’s too pwerful) but in spirit

Why y’all turning Peter into this beautiful lil cinnamon roll that he obviously isn’t? Stop writing Peter as a bad guy who becomes nice for Y/N’s lovely eyes. Write about a badass, murderous, dark minded Y/N. Write about a hot couple of villains who defeat the heroes for once. Dammit.


Honestly, give me an OC like that and I will read the shit outta it.

Until then, I’m just gonna have to write some myself.

You can read my work here “Let Us live” : Part ½; Part 2/2

And In the Name of Love: Here

Once Upon in Neverland: Part 1 Part 2 & Prequel

PETER PAN FIC REC

Enjoy and don’t forget to reblog to share if you liked it!

multi-shipping-af  asked:

Hi! So CoHF it's mentioned that faeries don't allow other faeries to address them by their real name and I was wondering how that works? Like what's the point of someone having a name that nobody uses? And is there a reason behind that? Also in the interview you recently posted, you said that faeries aren't immortal. So is time going differently in Faerie the reason behind them being centuries old eventhough they're not immortal or is it some magic they have to perform or smth?

“The name is the thing, and the true name is the true thing. To speak the name is to control the thing."— Ursula K. Le Guin, The Rule of Names

The idea that faeries do not allow others to call them by their “true names” is part of faerie folklore (which is why you will also find it in, say, Holly Black’s faerie books.) From the Wikipedia entry on True Names:

According to practises in folklore, knowledge of a true name allows one to affect another person or being magically. It is stated that knowing someone’s, or something’s, true name therefore gives the person (who knows the true name) power over them. This effect is used in many tales, such as in the German fairytale of Rumpelstiltskin: within Rumpelstiltskin and all its variants, the girl can free herself from the power of a supernatural helper who demands her child by learning its name. In the Scandinavian variants of the ballad Earl Brand, the hero can defeat all his enemies until the heroine, running away with him, pleads with him by name to spare her youngest brother. In Scandinavian beliefs, more magical beasts, such as the Nix, could be defeated by calling their name.” 

The point of the name that isn’t used is the power vested in it. You can use it, just as it can be used against you. You can demand entrance using your real name, or a hearing in front of the King/Queen, or rightful ownership of a thing. Kieran isn’t Kieran’s true name; “The Seelie Queen” is obviously not her real name either. Kieran is however still his name, it’s what Mark calls him and what everyone calls him. Kieran Hunter when he’s in the Hunt, Kieran Kingson when he’s in the Unseelie Court. 

Faeries are not immortal, but they are very long-lived and age slowly.

So like, I have opinions about how shows should structure themselves. Specifically like adventure-y, action-y shows like the Hundo. It’s built upon my years and years and years of watching shit like Buffy, Farscape, Charmed, Roswell, etc. (Micheal Geurin ILY)

This is basically my Grand Plan for when I inevitably am given a CW show. Inevitably. You know I’m for cereal because I’m going full adult capitalization on this bitch. 

Overall Show Structure

Overview 

First of all, I think a show should know how long it wants to run. There should be an end date in mind rather than letting it just go on forever until it dies in a last, pathetic choke for relevance. Yeah, lookin’ to you SPN. As far as I’m concerned 3, 5, and 7 seasons are the best options for intended length but I think an argument can be made for other choices. 

I’m going to focus on a 5 season structure because it’s the one I think is best from both a story telling and fandom supporting stance. So, lets brush quickly on why I think 3 and 7 seasons are also good options.

3 Season Run

This form of the story is clear, concise and focused. There’s nothing extraneous in a short run like this and I think there’s a lot to be said for clean story telling like this. In a 3 season run season 1 shows us who characters are and what their relationships are; season 2 tests those relationships and asks characters to stretch themselves; season 3 breaks those relationships and the tensions first overcome in season 1 as the tearing points. 

7 Season Run

Telling a story for this long is a big ask. A lot changes in that many seasons and honestly, I think this is the longest possible run before a show loses coherency (crime procedurals can escape this but I think they’re a unique breed). The 7 season show follows the same structure as the 5 season run but the last 2 seasons pull from a dangled bit of information in season 3. This’ll make a little more sense as we dig into my season break down. You’re also almost certainly looking at some pretty big central cast choices by the end of 7 seasons.

5 Season Run

Okay, so my personal favourite, the 5 season run. I think this is the best length for a show of this type, action adventure stories that are ultimately about people. In a 5 season run you build characters, break them down, and let them reform themselves. 5 seasons is enough to really explore the depths of characters with time and focus but not so long that you end up repeating personal stories in clumsy ways.  In broad brush strokes seasons 1 and 2 set up who are characters are and what their relationships will be; season 3 picks away and their sense of self and leaves them at their lowest point in it’s finale; seasons 4 and 5 build them back up, reaffirm who they are and why it is that they’re doing this. 

Season By Season Breakdown 

Season 1

A good first season is a hard one. You need a small, tight story with small, personal stakes. This is where you set up the core of your show (hopefully the central cast that will carry all the way to the end of your run) and tell us who we’re rooting for. We’re given 3 or 4 characters who are going to be at the heart of our show and we need to learn who they are. It’s important that they have interpersonal tension and that by the end of the season they have a stable, working relationship.

This is also when you want to keep the stakes low. No one saves the world in the first season. Where do you go from there? The first season is about personal danger and personal stakes. We shouldn’t even meet the real antagonist this season. Our plucky heroes duke it out with lackies and maybe a lieutenant, a second or third in command. We hear about but never meet the Big Bad. The season ends with the  heroes defeating the small scale. For Buffy that was overcoming a prophecy of her own death. For the Hundo that was repelling an attacking force from their home. Small scale, personal. It shows us who our characters are but doesn’t ask to much of them.

Season 2

All those relationships we set up in season 1 are going to be tested. We’re going to meet the Big Bad who was calling the shots last season and we’re going to take a swing at them. But season 2 also leads directly from season 1, maybe there’s a time jump but it’s short. Maybe there’s a new direction but it is born out of the ashes of the season 1 finale hook.  

Our core group expands, they stretch their wings and test what their relationships do under the stress of higher odds. Season 2 feels pressure on a bigger scale, the core group aren’t the only ones at stake now. Maybe it’s family and friends, or their town. The Big Bad has seen that they really are a threat and is playing for keeps. In a fatal show we should suffer a loss that hurts in the final episodes. There is a victory but it’s not without it’s losses 

Season 3

We get a departure from our first two seasons. Season 3 can take a time jump, it doesn’t have to fall directly on the heels of the second season. But something late in season 1 comes back up. A good way to play this is to take the antagonist from a two episode arch shortly before the conclusion of season 1 and make them a big deal. This is a good time to make the antagonist here someone with whom the Big Bad in the first two seasons had their own tension with. The heroes do this antagonist a favour when they take out the Big Bad but it proves that they’re a force to be reckoned with. 

This is a good season to narrow down, break a couple of those relationships. Swinging at the Big Bad last season cost our heroes something. In season 3 we know that heroes don’t have plot armor, the Good Guys don’t always walk away. The loss of a friend and the knowledge that this probably wont be the last loss weighs heavily on our heroes. They handle it differently and it starts to rupture the fabric of the group. Tension in the season is born of a question of how or if our group will stick together.

This is a good season to have one of our heroes play on the dark side a little. Maybe our new antagonist isn’t totally wrong about the way they view the world. 

The end of this season should see this antagonist dead and our heroes tentatively recommitted to the cause. A Pyrrhic victory at the conclusion of this season can make sure our heroes don’t want those deaths to be in vain. 

Season 4

At some point in first half of the first season a lacky  mentioned some Ultimate Villain that our first Big Bad was afraid of. Yeah, that mother fucker is back in the game. Or heroes are only tentatively recommitted to the cause, they’re as dark as we’ve ever seen them and they’re not all comfortable with the things they’ve done to get here. So season 4 is going to make them earn it. This is a season where they’re asked to prove that they are hero types, to make hard calls, to stretch themselves. 

But we also get victories. Someone they helped in the first or second season comes back as a guest star, is involved in their lives in a positive way because they helped them. This is where we get to see our heroes really commit, really see that they’re a force for good.

At the end of season 4 the Ultimate Villain isn’t defeated but they know what they have to do. They have achieved the first half of defeating this villain, maybe it’s securing a Magic Item, or a certain location, maybe it’s just figuring out who the fuck the villain actually is and what that means. But at the end of season 4 our heroes are poised to take their step at the Ultimate Villain. This is where we have our “I aim to misbehave” speech. Going into the fifth season our heroes are hard, are focused, and are ready to take no prisoners. 

Season 5

We should get a victory march. Season 5 should be an absolutely adoring ode to why we love these characters. It shouldn’t be easy for them, hell no. It should cost. We need one of the core group to die, absolutely. And die senselessly, die because the group make a stupid arrogant call because they’re the Heroes and they forgot what that can cost. Season 5 should pull away the arrogance that they learned in seasons 2, 3 and 4. By the end of season 5 they defeat the Ultimate Villain and walk out on top, but they do it by being the characters we first meet, the best versions of themselves. They have had all their rough edges buffed away by seasons of hardship and then they have the arrogance that winning gave them kicked out by hard, aching losses. But at the end of the finale the surviving cast should be their best selves, alive and well because they were the people that their friends could count on and because their relationships have helped make them the best they can be. 

So. Yeah. Someone give me a show. 

hey y'all i’m crying about vex, the girl who was raised to think she wasn’t good enough because she dared to exist and take up space where she wasn’t wanted, leaving her mark on the crest of whitestone

not only is she going to be remembered as grand mistress of the grey hunt - and most likely one of if not the most influential in history - and a lady of the de rolo family, and of course as one of the heroes who defeated the conclave and (hopefully) vecna and now as a champion of the patron god of whitestone, but the actual crest is CHANGING for her.

vex has never felt quite at home anywhere until she settled down in whitestone, not even emon, but she was offered love and respect and a home with the person she loves there, and now she’ll forever be marked in this city’s history even if her name isn’t spoken directly.

vex will always be A PART of whitestone now, their sixth star emblazoned on every crest in the city, every diplomatic document. vex’ahlia and whitestone are inseparable now.