deer on a wall

The One with the Giant Poking Device

Characters - Dean x Reader

Summary - An awkward moment while sharing a bed leads to an interesting morning.

Word Count - 5864

Warnings - Swearing (duh), injury (very slight),smut, oral sex/face riding (female), fingering, unsafe sex (remember irl to wrap it before you tap it)

A\N - This was written for mine and Jill’s Hubba Bubba Birthday writing challenge. Thank you to @sis-tafics for reading through and encouraging me. And a special thank you to @deansdirtylittlesecretsblog for betaing. You ladies are the absolute best!

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Originally posted by jessica-bones-winchester


Long, calloused fingers grip you tightly, digging into your soft curves as his hands pull you flush against his body. The heat spreads, radiating from him to sink into your bones, flowing through you to settle heavily in your center. The strength in the arms wrapping around you, the firmness of his chest against your full breasts, the gentleness of his hands as they caress you, all of it makes your breath slow, your heart race. You can’t hold back the low whine in your throat when you feel his hardening length pressing against your lower belly. He dips his head to nuzzle into your neck, his warm breath fanning over you. He nudges your head back further, the scruff on his jaw a delicious burn on your skin. Soft sighs catch in your throat as his lips glide over you and you can feel his cock twitch against you in response.

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A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

one day i’m going to open a bar, okay, and the name is going to be a werewolf pun?? or a reference?? and it’s gonna be themed. just slightly. like, blue moon beer or a full moon cocktail or whatever. not too obvious but noticeable. and i’m gonna make sure all my bartenders and staff are like, kind of buff and hairy looking, right? and maybe one of them will wear contacts. they always avoid eye contact, but just enough where patrons might see it from the corner of their eye, just for a second. and it will always be closed on full moons and the days surrounding it, right? it will say some bullshit like “reserved for a private venue” every time but if anyone tries to book it, no matter how early they are, it will always, always already be booked. i might leave some torn slightly red-stained clothes in the corner behind the bar, just barely visible. i’ll make sure some of the staff/visitors that i hired or whatever are eating really rare, almost raw (not unhealthily but noticeably) burgers. one or more of them sniff people randomly. one of the bartenders constantly makes bad werewolf/wolf puns and jokes to anyone who will listen. all the staff and a few regulars will chuckle. patrons sometimes hear them mutter something about irony. some of the regulars and bartenders discuss hunting a bit too much. one of the deer heads on the wall looks like it was bitten into. several regulars are constantly overheard debating how inaccurate various tv shows and movies are, such as “twilight”, “teen wolf”, and “the wolfman”, which all dissolves into a debate over various plot points and who’s the best character. (”c’mon, it’s obviously stiles!” “but he’s not a werewolf, man, side with your own people!” they ignore the stares they get at that.) there are a few dog beds behind the bar that are covered in hair, but pets aren’t allowed in the bar, and no one has ever seen a dog on the premises. if anyone asks about werewolves who isn’t one of the staff or regulars, they’re immediately met with dead silence and judging stares. until they leave. they never return. there are pictures of various staff members with large… suspiciously wolf-like dogs… on the wall. people overhear staff complaining about how they ripped their favorite shirt last night and it was annoying. one of the bartenders has clear scars from long claws disappearing into their sleeves. another has a bitemark on their collarbone and too much chest hair. anyone who tries to get hired is also met with dead silence, except for when i’ve told them to come in, in which case the manager sniffs them up and down, gives them an intense look, and brings them to the back room for “privacy”. there are an unusually low amount of deer in the nearby forest. guys. guys. i’m gonna make everyone in town think my bar is a werewolf den. this is gonna be so fucking great when i have money and time and less depression

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And now for something different.. 

I never knew what to do with this ikea frame I got years ago. And the skull + jaw I got from a forest keeper who found it in the woods he takes care of. Got another set like this too. I cleaned it, but never really got rid of the discoloring. Anyway, got some moss ideas, and finished this this weekend. Just really needed to get my mind off of things. 

anonymous asked:

nevermind my last ask lol "the right way to hunt" kys you disgusting animal hating creep. they did nothing to deserve to die.

Just posting this as an example. Please read through this and try to have an open mind. People have different ways of viewing the world. That’s totally ok. Some people hate hunting, and on the other end some are really obnoxious when it comes to hunting. But, from a biological and wildlife management standpoint, things are going to die awful deaths constantly no matter what. To ignore how cruel nature really is is to ignore reality. This doesn’t make it morally right to hunt or to abstain from hunting, it just boils down to a personal opinion. Wildlife is literally always considering that they are going to die and we can see this in their fecundity. When a frog lays a couple thousand eggs in a sitting, it’s doing so because it knows 95% of their offspring is a snack. Rabbits are similar. Deer, wild turkey, and other commonly hunted animals are almost solely funded (in management and scientific studies) by hunting dollars. Wild turkey was actually extinct for a period in NY before hunting funded a complete reintroduction of the species. That’s not me trying to make hunting seem great, it’s just a fact.

Right now hunting is significantly more environmentally friendly than eating farmed animals. Not to mention that even if you are completely vegan, when vegetable farmers harvest crops with machines they’re killing any creatures in that field. Skunks, rabbits, mice, snakes, raccoons, even bedding fawns are frequently killed when tractors harvest crops. Especially when it comes to corn and wheat raking. Even to plant large vegetable fields is taking away and fragmenting natural habitat. You can just never really know the entire journey your food is making unless it’s being harvested yourself. If you only garden and collect wild edibles then you’re about as guilt free as you can get, but that’s a nearly impossible lifestyle to keep year round. I will not criticize you for being vegan or abstaining from meat, because who am I to say what’s right and what’s wrong.

John is literally obtaining a phd in wildlife science, so based on our shared education what’s right for us is a hunter gatherer lifestyle. We don’t trophy hunt, and we eat almost everything down to the organs. I’m not just going out into the woods with a thirst for blood or just to have something on my wall. We harvested two deer last season and since have not bought an ounce of meat otherwise. The only protein we buy regularly is fish and even then we opt for bottom of the food chain fish to avoid large bioaccumulaters when possible.

Deer are especially overpopulated in our area. The problem with an overpopulation of deer is the spread of CWD (chronic wasting disease), which is extremely contagious and debilitating. In order to avoid massive population destroying diseases like that the Department of Environmental Conservation calculates a healthy amount of population to be removed through hunting. If CWD is found to be present DEC will literally send sharp shooters out to lower the population and continue testing. Geese are also extremely over populated in our area so DEC must literally put oil on goose eggs in the nest (killing the baby without the parents noticing so they don’t re-lay) to control the population.

My point is, death really is a requirement to maintain a healthy population. In places that are really lacking predators, like where I live, wildlife populations are prone to disease and starvation from too large of a population. At some point nature will take care of overpopulation. The risk of letting nature take its course (when predators are absent) is the spread of diseases that can last 5+ years just in the soil or overgrazing to the point of mass starvation. Too sheer of a drop in one population creates a domino effect among others, and eventually leads to mass death that may take years and years to recover from.

Like I said, I am not going to claim my lifestyle is better than yours or anyone else’s. I am very welcoming if you’d like to speak with me privately about your concerns and promise to be open and honest. Let’s have this conversation instead of just being mad at each other, ok? I’m sure at the very least we can find some middle ground!

A Technician’s Crush

Request: “i see that requests are open. when you get a chance can you write a matt the radar technician imagine? something where the reader always helps him fix things, offers to let him join her at lunch, etc and he thinks she’s being fake as hell until one day the commander overhears a bunch of storm troopers trash talking matt and the reader defends him?”

Pairing: Kylo Ren (Matt the Radar Technician) x Reader

Word Count: 1.8k

Warnings: Implied smut

Originally posted by nbcsnl

You watched the blonde from afar, admiring the way he would pause to push his glasses up every few minutes. He had been fussing with one of the electricity compartments in the hallway, tools splayed out in front of him as he attempted to find the right one for the job. The look on his face was one of pure horror; he had no idea what he was doing. It must’ve been his first day or something, since he had that wild ‘deer in the headlights’ sort of look to him.

You pushed off the wall you had been leaning on, eating a quick snack. You discarded the apple core in your hand before bringing yourself to the mechanic.

“Need some help?” You asked with an amused smile tweaking the corners of your lips. The man looked up, startled. He had a big frame, covered by the thick uniform of a radar technician. You squinted at his name tag. “Are you sure you’re in the right place Matt?”

“Of course I am.” He retorted defensively, turning his flushed face back to his tools. You slid to your knees, picking up a wrench and handing it to him. In the process of taking it he left a black oil smudge on your palm. “Sorry.” He muttered, grabbing your hand and pulling a rag from his pocket. He wiped at your hand, but it only transferred the black further into the lines on your skin. You giggled, the sound making Matt prop up slightly.

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A Fool of Mine [2]

Originally posted by luuuuuke-evans

Title: A Fool of Mine
Chapter: 2/?
Pairing: Gaston/Reader
Words: 1,987
Summary: [ Your next few days in town are spent exploring…and being chatted up by the wonderful captain. You take a visit to the tavern one night, and get quite a surprise. ]
A/N: This was honestly one of the most fun things I’ve written in a while, Gaston is just such a fun song hhh 
Part 1 can be found here
Part 3 can be found here


Over the course of the next few days, you’d managed to pick up on the town’s clockwork routine. You slowly became a part of it, going into town each morning, buying some bread or spices for the day, then relaxing in some secluded area and reading.

Today, however, you chose the well where the townsfolk (or rather, women) could be found washing clothes. There was a surprising lack of people there yet, but perhaps it was too early.

Across the village, the man who had attempted to flatter you stood with yet another fresh bouquet of flowers. This was going to be the day. After so long, today was going to be the day Belle would agree to marry him, he knew it.

You turned the page of your borrowed book, eager to continue.

‘The day that man allows true love to appear, those things which are well made will fall into confusion and will overturn everything we believe to be right and true.’

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New Headcannons

Woooah new text post.

-So anyways I think it’d be very interesting if cats decorated themselves for events/ceremonies especially the leaders. In Wolves Of The Beyond the wolf chieftains weaved prey bones into their fur to create a special “song” when they walked, leaders will do this at Gatherings or ceremonies.
-Leaders will weave bones, plants, and flowers into their fur as well as creating a crown of flowers, etc.
-They could also use different berries to stain their fur and such.
-It was rumored Brokenstar stained his fur with deathberries and kit blood.
-Battle paint is often used when going to war.
-Medicine cats and leaders will always keep some flowers and bones dressed at all times (though not all their outfit stays on 24/7).
-Deputies will typically have some sort of small accessory on them to dignify them.
-Riverclan cats nearly always use shells and fishbones, as well as willow, lilies, and pond irises. For added sparkle they also use fish scales.
-Thunderclan usually uses mouse, vole, and squirrel bones with brambles, thistles, daisies, and bracken. They often use sparrow, jay, or robin feathers too.
-Shadowclan overall decorates with the most bones which are usually snake, frog, rat, bat, or lizard. Bat wings, dried frog legs, raven or crow feathers, and lizard or snake scales are often incorporated. Out of all Clans they use flowers the least though leaders and highly honored warriors collect roses.
-In the Clans flowers are not seen as “feminine” Tigerstar’s crown actually included blood red roses and thorns.
-Shadowclan is infamous for coating their claws in deathberry juice or snake venom in battle.
-Windclan uses the most flowers out of the five. They love sweet scented flowers of all kinds, their garb is known to be softer in both texture and color. They often use sheep’s wool as added fluff. Very battle hungry warriors/leaders or tunnelers are honored with rabbit skulls and bones.
-Hawkheart was the only medicine cat known to Windclan to incorporate bones in his dress.
-Windclan tunnelers would wear crystals or pretty rocks during ceremonies. Their crowns nearly never contained flowers or grass but mostly bones, roots, and twigs.
-Skyclan’s crowns were very different and often included Twoleg things such as cloth or glass. They were made mostly of bird and squirrel bones and feathers.
-Leaders’ and medicine dens are heavily decorated with bones, feathers, fur, and flowers.
-In Thunderclan a deer and two badger skulls are hung on the walls. A badger pelt is also used for the leader’s nest. The badger skulls and pelt were dried and cleaned from two badgers killed in the badger attack.
-In Shadowclan many snake and bat skulls line the walls, in the center being a fox skull and pelt said to have been killed by Cedarstar.
-Windclan’s leader’s cave is centerd around a sheep skull (one had been found dead many moons ago) and rabbit skulls. The sheep’s skin is highly prized and was carried by warriors throughout the Great Journey. There are also innumerable heather flowers in the (underground) den.
-Riverclan decorates with clams and shells mostly. They prefer a more plant and moss orientated leader nest than other clans.
-Skyclan’s leader den has many bird skulls but in the center lies a pile of extraordinarily soft feathers.
-Many warriors dens also contain pelts and such to sleep on.
-It is often the medicine cat’s job to clean and dry pelts and bones. Bones improperly cleaned smell terrible and rot.
-During warrior ceremonies or when announcing mates all the clan will dress win their very best.
-Warriors are buried with their garb though often a mate or kit is allowed to keep a lock of fur and add it to their own dress.
-The warrior’s dress and ceremonial outfit is where the kittypet rumor of “they eat bones!” started.

Anyways sorry that was so long! Home you guys enjoy :3 I was inspires by @aesthetic-warriors to think of more headcannons!

Make Me Feel

Pairing: Steve x Reader

Words: 4,646

Warnings: Swearing, Mentions of torture, Slightly angsty (if you squint real hard), Crying Steve.

A/n: I was drowning in Steve feels a while ago and I just had to write this. P.s. Guys, this is before the fall of SHIELD. I just wanted to write a story where none of by babies were fighting each other and were semi-not-really-almost happy.

Summary: After the Avengers save you from years of torture, you form a quick attachment to Steve.


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