deconstructivist architecture

We remember architect Zaha Hadid with her visionary design for The Peak Project from our collection. Hadid proposed a transformation of the site itself by excavating the hills of Kowloon and using the rock to build artificial cliffs. Into this new topography, she interjected cantilevered beams, shardlike fragments, and other elements that seemed to splinter the structure into its myriad constituent parts, as if it had been subjected to some powerful de–stabilizing force. Hadid’s work was exhibited in MoMA’s 1988 show Deconstructivist Architecture.


[Zaha Hadid. The Peak Project, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China (Exterior perspective). 1991. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Zaha Hadid]

Deconstruction

An approach, introduced by French philosopher Jacques Derrida, in 1960s. It is a method of criticism and mode of analytical inquiry of practice in reading. It is in a way to criticize the concept of a Single Unitary Being in traditional Western metaphysics. It suggests that any text is not a discrete whole (but contains several irreconcilable and contradictory meanings) Any text has more than one interpretation (there is no absolute black & white, right or wrong) The incompatibility of these interpretations is irreducible.