declassification

The Panama Canal: Riots, Treaties, Elections, and a Little Military Madness

The National Declassification Center’s newest special project release concerns U.S. and Panamanian foreign relations: The Panama Canal: Riots, Treaties, Elections, and a Little Military Madness, 1959 – 1973.

The images selected and scanned for this release are a sampling of the records, 255 pages from a total of 229,160 pages. The records give insight and perspective into treaty negotiations, interactions between the American Embassy and U.S. government agencies on the Canal, the impact of Panamanian politics and elections on treaty negotiations, and the general unrest caused by the U.S. presence on the Canal Zone. The newly released records are from the Department of State.

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

Fic I’d like to write but would only be amusing to me: a multi-fandom crossover that’s just a series of vignettes showing other fandoms reacting to the declassification of the Stargate program.

anneapocalypse  asked:

ONI, how do you respond to rumors that letting Project Freelancer go public was a distraction stunt to get media attention off the reawakened Master Chief Petty Officer John-117 and his failing AI? Is it true that Dr. Halsey is in custody? What about Dr. Church? How does Chairman Hargrove fit into all of this? Also, where did the Spartans come from? xoxo Interstellar Daily

ah, ms. andrews! we were wondering when you were going to show up. 

project freelancer’s public declassification and the master chief’s reappearance were not planned. we promise. we truly wish we didn’t have to talk about project freelancer, just thinking about how much money we pumped into that makes us sad. and we totally didn’t prop up a bigger AI failure to distract from what’s her face. 

dr. halsey was “re-accommodated” as per the unsc and united spaceflight policies, and is enjoying a nice research position at ivanoff station probably. we stopped caring the second we threw her on that prowler. 

while the death of dr. church is very unfortunate as justice is unable to be served, we watched seasons 1 through 14. we know that church will be back, probably, in some form. 

hargrove is in custody, in the cell two cells down from ben giraud. we’re currently playing men at work’s “who can it be now” on loop. his massive conflict of interest and unethical dealings with charon industries and the oversight subcommittee are enough to put anyone behind bars. except us. we still get to legally do all that shit. 

and finally, we got the spartans from the same place we buy freelancers and m808 main battle tanks: the lowest bidder. 

thanks for the hard hitting interview, ms. andrews! and please ask your cameraman to stop sending us requests for live flood samples for his new wave zombie movie. 

ISOO Report to the President

The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO), established in 1978, is responsible to the President for overseeing the Government-wide security classification program, and receives policy and program guidance from the National Security Council.  ISOO has been part of the National Archives and Records Administration since 1995.  You can learn more about ISOO at www.archives.gov/isoo

The 34th Annual Report to the President covering 2013 was released earlier this month.

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

THE FUCKING TRUTH!

PHI PHO O’FUCKINGHARA HAS TO THANK’S WILLIAM’S DECLASSIFICATION FOR HER TO NOT BE ELIMINATED ON HER IS RAINIG MEN LYP SINC AGAINST SHARON AND BE ON THE TOP 3(WHICH LATRICE MOTHAFUKING ROYALE DESERVED TO BE ON INSTEAD OF YOU, YOU BITTER CUNT)

YOU TRIED TO HARD TO MOVE AND DIDN’T GOT THE BEAT AND ESSENCE OF THE SONG

YOUR DEATH DROP WAS SHIT

YOUR WIG FLEW AWAY

YOU. TOOK. YOUR. SHOES. OFF

Gurl you betta apologise to William, cuz if she didn’t broke the rules, you wouldn’t be on the top 3 IN FIRST PLACE.

anonymous asked:

When do you think they actually released Steve's name to the public? Surely not during the war (in the medal scene they're giving it to "Captain America" not Captain Rogers), but how long after until his name was declassified? How long after until all their names were declassified?

That’s a really good question, Anon!

I don’t know for sure when Steve’s name was released to the public, but in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the announcement of his disappearance appears in a newspaper on March 5, 1945, with the headline, “ROGERS DISAPPEARS.” This tells us that his name, at least, was released to the public sometime between his receipt of the serum and the plane crash. (Best guess is that his name was revealed to the public during the media frenzy around USO tour, as he was probably billed by his real name in the propaganda films.) That doesn’t mean that information regarding his whereabouts or work between the USO tour and the plane crash was readily available, nor does it mean that the rest of the Howling Commandos were publicly known.

To answer those questions, we should look at the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which was first signed into law on July 4, 1966, by President Johnson and has since been amended and expanded several times. We should also look at the classification and declassification processes of the United States.

The FOIA basically allows members of the public to request declassification of specific documents. However, the requester must be able to specify which documents they seek with reasonable certainty (you can’t try to request “any documents about X,” you have to be able to say “I’d like the documents about X from Y time period” or similar), and the government can still refuse to release them. It’s been used to request everything from documents on J. Edgar Hoover to the White House’s home-brewed beer recipe.

It’s almost guaranteed that the contributions of the Howling Commandos in the War were heavily classified (almost definitely Secret, and quite possibly Top Secret). It’s more difficult to say for certain when these things were declassified, though. (And much of it has certainly been declassified, because there wouldn’t be a Smithsonian exhibit featuring the Commandos without that happening.)

Agencies are required to declassify their documents after 25 years, unless they fall under one of the exemptions in the FOIA. Anything classified for 50 years or more must contain information on human intelligence sources, weapons of mass destruction, or have special permission. Anything older than 75 years must have special permission.

Given that the interview with Peggy from the Smithsonian exhibit took place in 1953, I think it’s reasonably safe to say that the Commandos’ names were released either during or just after the war. The specifics of their service, however, may not have been released until the 1990s, when the 50-year mark had passed. It’s also possible that some of their activities could still be classified, especially since they’ve not yet hit the 75-year mark (that will be in 2018) and since Steve is still alive and well.

anonymous asked:

If Captain America were real, would any of his stuff be in the National Archives?

Wait, Captain America isn’t real? 

If he were, we would likely have Captain Roger’s personnel records at the National Archives in St. Louis.

Also, like any classified project, our National Declassification Center would have had to review to any records pertaining the Super-Soldier Project.

We also have fictional accounts of Captain Rogers exploits in comic book form, as part of the records of the Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency, such as this copy of the “Fighting American”:

7

The USS Utah (AG-16), which served as an anti-aircraft gunnery training vessel at the time of the attack, had sustained damaging hits from torpedoes and a bomb. The Utah quickly took in water, formed a serious list and it became evident that the ship would capsize. 

After the attack an attempt at salvage was made, but was unsuccessful and no further attempts were made. The Utah, along with the USS Arizona (BB-39) were the only two ships not to be refloated and salvaged.

A report written by Commander John F. Warris, Executive Officer of the Utah on January 7, 1942 highlights the damage the ship sustained during the attack and the issues it faced with flooding and capsizing.

Two enclosures are included. One from T. H. Thompson, “B” Division Officer regarding the distribution of fuel in the tanks and the other from Lieutenant (Jr. Gr.) P. F. Hauck regarding efforts made to close hatches when the flooding began.

Document: NAID 1105681 (Records of the Bureau of Ships, RG 19) Declassification number NND 960035.

In Cold War, U.S. Spy Agencies Used 1,000 Nazis

By ERIC LICHTBLAU

OCT. 26, 2014

WASHINGTON — In the decades after World War II, the C.I.A. and other United States agencies employed at least a thousand Nazis as Cold War spies and informants and, as recently as the 1990s, concealed the government’s ties to some still living in America, newly disclosed records and interviews show.

At the height of the Cold War in the 1950s, law enforcement and intelligence leaders like J. Edgar Hoover at the F.B.I. and Allen Dulles at the C.I.A. aggressively recruited onetime Nazis of all ranks as secret, anti-Soviet “assets,” declassified records show. They believed the ex-Nazis’ intelligence value against the Russians outweighed what one official called “moral lapses” in their service to the Third Reich.

The agency hired one former SS officer as a spy in the 1950s, for instance, even after concluding he was probably guilty of “minor war crimes.”

And in 1994, a lawyer with the C.I.A. pressured prosecutors to drop an investigation into an ex-spy outside Boston implicated in the Nazis’ massacre of tens of thousands of Jews in Lithuania, according to a government official.

Evidence of the government’s links to Nazi spies began emerging publicly in the 1970s. But thousands of records from declassified files, Freedom of Information Act requests and other sources, together with interviews with scores of current and former government officials, show that the government’s recruitment of Nazis ran far deeper than previously known and that officials sought to conceal those ties for at least a half-century after the war.

In 1980, F.B.I. officials refused to tell even the Justice Department’s own Nazi hunters what they knew about 16 suspected Nazis living in the United States.

The bureau balked at a request from prosecutors for internal records on the Nazi suspects, memos show, because the 16 men had all worked as F.B.I. informants, providing leads on Communist “sympathizers.” Five of the men were still active informants.

Refusing to turn over the records, a bureau official in a memo stressed the need for “protecting the confidentiality of such sources of information to the fullest possible extent.”

Some spies for the United States had worked at the highest levels for the Nazis.

One SS officer, Otto von Bolschwing, was a mentor and top aide to Adolf Eichmann, architect of the “Final Solution,” and wrote policy papers on how to terrorize Jews.

Yet after the war, the C.I.A. not only hired him as a spy in Europe, but relocated him and his family to New York City in 1954, records show. The move was seen as a “a reward for his loyal postwar service and in view of the innocuousness of his [Nazi] party activities,” the agency wrote.

His son, Gus von Bolschwing, who learned many years later of his father’s ties to the Nazis, sees the relationship between the spy agency and his father as one of mutual convenience forged by the Cold War.

“They used him, and he used them,” Gus von Bolschwing, now 75, said in an interview. “It shouldn’t have happened. He never should have been admitted to the United States. It wasn’t consistent with our values as a country.”

When Israeli agents captured Eichmann in Argentina in 1960, Otto von Bolschwing went to the C.I.A. for help because he worried they might come after him, memos show.

Agency officials were worried as well that Mr. von Bolschwing might be named as Eichmann’s “collaborator and fellow conspirator and that the resulting publicity may prove embarrassing to the U.S.” a C.I.A. official wrote.

After two agents met with Mr. von Bolschwing in 1961, the agency assured him it would not disclose his ties to Eichmann, records show. He lived freely for another 20 years before prosecutors discovered his wartime role and prosecuted him. He agreed to give up his citizenship in 1981, dying months later.

In all, the American military, the C.I.A., the F.B.I. and other agencies used at least 1,000 ex-Nazis and collaborators as spies and informants after the war, according to Richard Breitman, a Holocaust scholar at American University who was on a government-appointed team that declassified war-crime records.

The full tally of Nazis-turned-spies is probably much higher, said Norman Goda, a University of Florida historian on the declassification team, but many records remain classified even today, making a complete count impossible.

“U.S. agencies directly or indirectly hired numerous ex-Nazi police officials and East European collaborators who were manifestly guilty of war crimes,” he said. “Information was readily available that these were compromised men.”

None of the spies are known to be alive today.

The wide use of Nazi spies grew out of a Cold War mentality shared by two titans of intelligence in the 1950s: Mr. Hoover, the longtime F.B.I. director, and Mr. Dulles, the C.I.A. director.

Mr. Dulles believed “moderate” Nazis might “be useful” to America, records show. Mr. Hoover, for his part, personally approved some ex-Nazis as informants and dismissed accusations of their wartime atrocities as Soviet propaganda.

In 1968, Mr. Hoover authorized the F.B.I. to wiretap a left-wing journalist who wrote critical stories about Nazis in America, internal records show. Mr. Hoover declared the journalist, Charles Allen, a potential threat to national security.

John Fox, the bureau’s chief historian, said: “In hindsight, it is clear that Hoover, and by extension the F.B.I., was shortsighted in dismissing evidence of ties between recent German and East European immigrants and Nazi war crimes. It should be remembered, though, that this was at the peak of Cold War tensions.”

The C.I.A. declined to comment for this article.

The Nazi spies performed a range of tasks for American agencies in the 1950s and 1960s, from the hazardous to the trivial, the documents show.

In Maryland, Army officials trained several Nazi officers in paramilitary warfare for a possible invasion of Russia. In Connecticut, the C.I.A. used an ex-Nazi guard to study Soviet-bloc postage stamps for hidden meanings.

In Virginia, a top adviser to Hitler gave classified briefings on Soviet affairs. And in Germany, SS officers infiltrated Russian-controlled zones, laying surveillance cables and monitoring trains.

But many Nazi spies proved inept or worse, declassified security reviews show. Some were deemed habitual liars, confidence men or embezzlers, and a few even turned out to be Soviet double agents, the records show.

Mr. Breitman said the morality of recruiting ex-Nazis was rarely considered. “This all stemmed from a kind of panic, a fear that the Communists were terribly powerful and we had so few assets,” he said.

Efforts to conceal those ties spanned decades.

When the Justice Department was preparing in 1994 to prosecute a senior Nazi collaborator in Boston named Aleksandras Lileikis, the C.I.A. tried to intervene.

The agency’s own files linked Mr. Lileikis to the machine-gun massacres of 60,000 Jews in Lithuania. He worked “under the control of the Gestapo during the war,” his C.I.A. file noted, and “was possibly connected with the shooting of Jews in Vilna.”

Even so, the agency hired him in 1952 as a spy in East Germany — paying him $1,700 a year, plus two cartons of cigarettes a month — and cleared the way for him to immigrate to America four years later, records show.

Mr. Lileikis lived quietly for nearly 40 years, until prosecutors discovered his Nazi past and prepared to seek his deportation in 1994.

When C.I.A. officials learned of the plans, a lawyer there called Eli Rosenbaum at the Justice Department’s Nazi-hunting unit and told him “you can’t file this case,” Mr. Rosenbaum said in an interview. The agency did not want to risk divulging classified records about its ex-spy, he said.

Mr. Rosenbaum said he and the C.I.A. reached an understanding: If the agency was forced to turn over objectionable records, prosecutors would drop the case first. (That did not happen, and Mr. Lileikis was ultimately deported.)

The C.I.A. also hid what it knew of Mr. Lileikis’s past from lawmakers.

In a classified memo to the House Intelligence Committee in 1995, the agency acknowledged using him as a spy but made no mention of the records linking him to mass murders. “There is no evidence,” the C.I.A. wrote, “that this Agency was aware of his wartime activities.”

[This article is adapted from “The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler’s Men,” by Eric Lichtblau, to be published Tuesday by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.]

nytimes.com
After 40 Years, the Complete Pentagon Papers

It may be a first in the annals of government secrecy: Declassifying documents to mark the anniversary of their leak to the press. But that is what will happen Monday, when the federal government plans to finally release the secret government study of the Vietnam War known as the Pentagon Papers 40 years after it was first published by The New York Times.

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

My CA declassification MIDI

Nanjing is carrying on transformation of the wired digital television, I order one set of and pay the channel, but other two set-boxes can only watch 60 multiple free programs. If what let other two set-boxes watch to me and order paid the channel, mean I want to pay charging the visual fee of triple! How often does it fiddle with, study CA to be little to have achievement, bring, come out, give, share, down.

Pieces of this look over full text

Jane Foster refuses to be photographed with the Avengers until after her first article on the Einstein-Rosen Bridge is published (after the fall of SHIELD and its declassification by default). She wants the article published on its academic merits, not part of a rush to claim some part of the Avengers. She would also rather be the scientist that connected Earth and Asgard, instead of “Thor’s rumored girlfriend.”

Transforming Classification

The Public Interest Declassification Board (PIDB) at the National Archives has been hard at work this year developing recommendations to the President of the United States to transform the national security classification system.

PIDB is an advisory committee established by Congress to advise and provide recommendations to the President and other executive branch officials on the identification, collection, review for declassification, and release of declassified records of archival value.  In addition, PIDB advises the President on policies regarding classification and declassification of national security information.

On Thursday, December 6th, the Public Interest Declassification Board will host an open meeting to discuss its recommendations to the President on Transforming the Security Classification System. The full Report to the President will be published online on December 6th . The meeting will focus on the Board’s fourteen recommendations, centering on the need for new policies for classifying information, new processes for declassifying information, and the imperative for using and integrating technology into these processes.

When: December 6, 2012 from 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Doors Open: 8:45 a.m.
Where: The Archivist’s Reception Room, Room 105 in the National Archives Building
Address: 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC
(Note: Attendees must enter through the Pennsylvania Avenue entrance.)
RSVP: pidb@nara.gov

The meeting is open to all, including press and media. Space is limited and attendees must register via pidb@nara.gov. Please note that one form of Government-issued photo identification (e.g. driver’s license) is required to gain admittance.

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog

We’re excited to participate in #AskAnArchivist on October 30! Archivists from our locations across the nation are ready to answer your questions at @usnatarchives on Twitter tomorrow.

We have archivists that concentrate on the history of the National Archives, work with audiovisual materials, declassify documents, textual reference, Presidential materials and more.

This is your chance to find out how archivists came to have these jobs, what they like or dislike, and what they do! No question is too serious or too silly–so find out about FOIA or learn about the invention of the Beach Cart.

The schedule is below, but feel free to tweet us questions ahead of time!

@usnatarchives

8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET

Got a question for our Presidential libraries? Tweet a question to

@FDRLibrary

@IkeLibrary

@JFKLibrary

@LBJLibrary

@carterlibrary

@WJCLibrary

@bush41library

Schedule for @usnatarchives

8:30-9 am EDT, Steve Greene

Steve Greene is an Archivist and the Special Media Holdings Coordinator for the Office of Presidential Libraries since 2010. Before that, Steve was the AV Archivist for the Nixon Presidential Library. Steve has worked with the Preservation, Processing and Reference Service on Stills, Sound Recordings and Moving Images at the Presidential Libraries for over 15 years.

9-9:30 am EDT, Amber Forrester

Amber Forrester is an Archivist in NARA’s National Declassification Center, where she has worked for four years. She spends her days working with NARA’s classified holdings and living the NDC motto: “Releasing all we can, protecting what we must.” Amber holds an MLS in Archives & Records Management from the University of Maryland and a BA in American Studies and History from Case Western Reserve University.

9:30-10 am EDT, Rebecca Collier

Rebecca Collier is a Supervisory Archivist of the Textual Reference Archives II Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. She has worked in reference at NARA for over 29 years. Her unit assists the public daily and responds to requests concerning many topics including diplomatic, labor, commerce, treasury, National Park Service, American Red Cross records as well as military unit records during the 20th Century (especially WWII, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War) and various intelligence agencies. She has a Master of Arts in History from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and a Bachelor of Arts in History from Ohio Northern University.

10-10:30 am EDT, Jessie Kratz

As Historian of the National Archives, Jessie promotes the history and importance of the agency. She regularly writes articles and blog posts, and gives talks on Archives history. Before becoming Historian, Jessie worked at the Center for LegislativeArchives from 2000 to 2013 where she created publications and exhibits that highlighted Congress’s role in American history. Jessie has an M.A. from the George Washington University in Washington, DC.

11-11:30 am EDT, Joseph Keefe

Joseph P. Keefe is an Archives Specialist and Reference Team Lead and Social Media co-coordinator with the National Archives Northeast Region-Boston and has worked for the National Archives for over 10 years. He began his National Archives career in the Federal Records Center where he worked in both research and the transfer of records into the facility. He moved to the archives in 2006 in his current position as an Archives Specialist. Joseph has a bachelor’s degree in History from Framingham State University in Framingham, Massachusetts, and a MA in American History from the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

1-2 pm EDT, Alan Walker

Alan is an archivist in Textual Processing at Archives II. He works with records of civilian Federal agencies, including those of the National Archives itself. He loves photography and worked with our photographic holdings in the Still Pictures unit here at the Archives for many years. Alan received his M.A. in History from George Mason University.

2-3 pm EDT, Christina Jones and Ketina Taylor

Ketina Taylor started with the National Archives in 2000 in the Still Picture Unit in College Park, Maryland.  In 2005, she was promoted to archivist and moved to the State Department Reference Team and eventually the Civilian Records Processing Team. In 2007, Ketina accepted a position for the future George W. Bush Library, and in 2012, she was transferred to the National Archives at Fort Worth.

3 pm EDT, Gerald Ford Presidential Library

Elizabeth Druga and Stacy Davis will be available to answer questions. Elizabeth Druga is an archives technician at the Ford Presidential Library in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She works with textual and AV collections.

3:30 pm EDT, Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library

Jason Schulz, supervisory archivist; Meghan Lee-Parker, archivist; and Carla Braswell, archives technician, will be available to answer questions.

4:30 pm EDT (1:30 pm PDT) Sue Karren

Sue has been with the National Archives for 28 years and is now the director of the National Archives at Seattle. Previously she also worked in the Chicago and Washington, DC, offices and often says, “Come see what we’re saving for you!” Sue has a Master’s degree in 20th-century military history but after 25 years in Seattle thinks of herself as a Western history generalist.

Presidential Libraries

@FDRLibrary, 10-11 a.m. EDT

Bob Clark, the FDR Library’s Deputy Director and Supervisory Archivist will answer your questions.

@IkeLibrary, 10-11 a.m. CDT

Tim Rives, Deputy Director of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Library, will be on hand with archivist Chris Abraham.

@LBJLibrary, noon to 5 pm EDT

Liza Talbot is a digital archivist at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, TX, where her reference responsibilities include questions about President Johnson and politics, speeches, and science. She also works to make the LBJ Library’s holdings–especially the spectacular photo, audio, and video collections–available on the web for everyone to use. Liza has a BA in History and English from Oberlin College and an MSIS in Archives and Digital Libraries and from the University of Texas, and she is very interested these days in Public History on the web; she created the LBJ Time Machine blog (http://lbjlibrary.tumblr.com/) to experiment with telling stories in new ways.

@CarterLibrary, 8:30-10:30 am, 1:30-3 pm EDT

8:30-10:30 a.m. Ryan Rutkowski is an archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library. At the Carter Library, he processes records, responds to research requests, and assists the AV Archivist with her projects. In his eight years as an archivist (3 years with Carter), Ryan have developed skills in the areas of archives and records management, exhibit design, policy creation, and historical research and writing. Ryan received his MA in Public History from Loyola University Chicago.

11:30-12:30 Amanda Pellerin is an archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library working mainly with the foreign relations materials in the collections. Amanda also has responsibilities in digital projects at the Carter Library including the ongoing processing of oral history collections. She has worked in the archival profession for 10 years (4 years with Carter) gaining experience in processing sensitive collections, donor relations, outreach initiatives, and policy development. She has a Masters in Heritage Preservation from Georgia State University and Masters in Library and Information Sciences from Valdosta State University.

@WJCLibrary, 9 am-noon CDT

A group of archivists from the William J. Clinton Presidential Library will be available to answer questions: Brittany Gerke, Racheal Carter-Ragan, Jamie Metrailer, Kara Ellis, Kim Coryat, and Whitney Ross.

@bush41library, 10-11 am CDT

Michelle Bogart is a certified archivist with an MSIS in archives. She has worked in collecting and administrative archives and has been at the Bush Library for five years.

Image: An Archives staff member in the 1930sshows off the cellulose acetate used for the lamination of documents. (64-NA-464; National Archives Identifier 3493252)