decade of vaccines

bbc.com
A decade on, vaccine has halved cervical cancer rate
The world's first cancer vaccine has halved the number of new cervical cancers ten years after it was first administered in Australia.

The world’s first cancer vaccine was administered in Australia exactly 10 years ago.

Since then, the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine has been rolled out across 130 countries and halved the number of new cervical cancers.

The HPV vaccine also protects against cancers in the throat and mouth in both men and women.

Prof Ian Frazer said the vaccine could eradicate cancers caused by HPV within 40 years.

“It helps not only control cervical cancer but also the oropharyngeal cancer - the cancers inside the mouth that are caused by these viruses,” Prof Frazer, chief executive of the Translational Research Institute, said.

“If we vaccinate enough people we will eliminate these viruses because they only infect humans. And in Australia there’s already been a 90% reduction in infections in the 10 years the programme has been running.”

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usnews.com
Amid uproar over abortion videos, scientists say fetal tissue essential for medical research
BOSTON (AP) — The furor on Capitol Hill over Planned Parenthood has stoked a debate about the use of tissue from aborted fetuses in medical research. But U.S. scientists have been using such cells for decades to develop vaccines and seek treatments for ailments ranging from vision loss and neurological disorders to cancer and AIDS.

FACT: U.S. scientists have been using fetal cells for decades to develop vaccines and treatments for a host of ailments — including rubella, cancer, AIDS, vision loss, and neurological disorders.

Today, however, it is politically effective, and socially acceptable, to deny scientific fact. Narrowly defined, “creationism” was a minor current in American thinking for much of the 20th century. But in the years since I was a student, a well-funded effort has skillfully rebranded that ideology as “creation science” and pushed it into classrooms across the country. Though transparently unscientific, denying evolution has become a litmus test for some conservative politicians, even at the highest levels.

Meanwhile, climate deniers, taking pages from the creationists’ PR playbook, have manufactured doubt about fundamental issues in climate science that were decided scientifically decades ago. And anti-vaccine campaigners brandish a few long-discredited studies to make unproven claims about links between autism and vaccination.

[…]What do I tell my students? From one end of their educational trajectory to the other, our society told these kids science was important. How confusing is it for them now, when scientists receive death threats for simply doing honest research on our planet’s climate history?