debt nation

Imagine Loki gets a chance to pay his debt to society sometime after Ragnarok is averted.

To his great amusement, he is put under your command. You have no interest in him (yet or at all, either is fine) other than to show him the ropes, get him.to repair some of the national treasures which otherwise are irreplaceable, and ensure that for once, he gives someone a full apology, namely Black Widow. You are a modern feminist, and “whinging female crotch” is simply not going to fly under your command!

Your first words to him are:
“I don’t care who you are, I don’t care where you’re from. I couldn’t care less if you make me suffer eternally in some horrible prison because you’re a GOD and I am NOT! But by the time I’m done with you, you will regret two things. Destroying Grand Central Station and reducing enemy combatants to their genitals. I will get a full heartful apology out of you for Widow or I will live and die causing trouble for you and yours. I will make you rue the day you thought telling a female combatant she was just the sum of her parts was a fair insult! Loki of Asgard, my name is Y/N, and today you’ve met your match.”

An Orgy of Unnecessary Cruelty

The theme that unites all of Trump’s initiatives so far is their unnecessary cruelty.

1. His new budget comes down especially hard on the poor – imposing unprecedented cuts in low-income housing, job training, food assistance, legal services, help to distressed rural communities, nutrition for new mothers and their infants, funds to keep poor families warm, even “meals on wheels.”

These cuts come at a time when more American families are in poverty than ever before, including 1 in 5 children. 

Why is Trump doing this? To pay for the biggest hike in military spending since the 1980s. Yet the U.S. already spends more on its military than the next 7 biggest military budgets put together.

2. His plan to repeal and “replace” the Affordable Care Act will cause 14 million Americans to lose their health insurance next year, and 24 million by 2026.

Why is Trump doing this? To bestow $600 billion in tax breaks over the decade to wealthy Americans. This windfall comes at a time when the rich have accumulated more wealth than at any time in the nation’s history. 

The plan reduces the federal budget deficit by only $337 billion over the next ten years – a small fraction of the national debt, in exchange for an enormous amount of human hardship.

3. His ban on Syrian refugees and reduction by half in the total number of refugees admitted to the United States comes just when the world is experiencing the worst refugee crisis since World War II.

Why is Trump doing this? The ban does little or nothing to protect Americans from terrorism. No terrorist act in the United States has been perpetrated by a Syrian or by anyone from the six nations whose citizens are now banned from traveling to the United States. You have higher odds of being struck by lightening than dying from an immigrant terrorist attack.  

4. His dragnet roundup of undocumented immigrants is helter-skelter – including people who have been productive members of our society for decades, and young people who have been here since they were toddlers.

Why is Trump doing this? He has no compelling justification. Unemployment is down, crime is down, and we have fewer undocumented workers in the U.S. today than we did five years ago. 

Trump is embarking on an orgy of cruelty for absolutely no reason. This is morally repugnant. It violates every ideal this nation has ever cherished. We have a moral responsibility to stop it.

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TRUMP’S UNNECESSARY CRUELTY

The theme that unites all of Trump’s initiatives so far is their unnecessary cruelty.

1. His new budget comes down especially hard on the poor – imposing unprecedented cuts in low-income housing, job training, food assistance, legal services, help to distressed rural communities, nutrition for new mothers and their infants, funds to keep poor families warm, even “meals on wheels.”

These cuts come at a time when more American families are in poverty than ever before, including 1 in 5 children. So, why is Trump doing this? To pay for the biggest hike in military spending since the 1980s – at a time when the U.S. already spends more on its military than the next 7 biggest military budgets put together.

2. Trump and his enablers in the GOP are on the way to repealing the Affordable Care Act, and replacing it in a way that could cause 14 million Americans to lose their health insurance next year, and 24 million by 2026.

Why is Trump doing this? To give $600 billion in tax cuts over the decade mostly to wealthy Americans, when the rich have accumulated more wealth than at any time in the nation’s history.

The plan reduces the federal budget by only $337 billion over the next ten years – that is a small fraction of the national debt, in exchange for the largest redistribution from the poor and middle class to the wealthy in modern history.

3. Trump is banning Syrian refugees and slashing the total number of refugees this year by more than half. This comes just when the world is experiencing the worst refugee crisis since World War II.

So, why is he doing this? Your odds of dying by a lightening strike are higher than by an immigrant terrorist attack. No terrorist attacker inside the U.S. has come from Syria (nor, for that matter, from any of the 6 countries in Trump’s current travel ban.)

4. Trump is rounding up undocumented immigrants helter-skelter – including people who have been productive members of our society for decades, and young people who have been here since they were toddlers.

Why is Trump doing this? These actions come when unemployment is down, crime is down, and we have fewer undocumented workers in the U.S. today than we did ten years ago.

Trump is embarking on an orgy of cruelty for absolutely no reason. This is profoundly immoral. It is morally incumbent on all of us to stop it.

the signs as lines from the cabinet battles
  • aries: hey, turn around, bend over, i'll show you where my shoe fits
  • taurus: it's too many damn pages for any man to understand
  • gemini: you think i'm frightened of you, man?
  • cancer: when we were on death's doorstep, when we were needy- we made a promise, we signed a treaty
  • leo: these are wise words, enterprising men quote 'em- don't act surprised, you guys, 'cause i wrote 'em!
  • virgo: you must be out of your GODDAMN MIND
  • libra: madison, you're mad as a hatter, son, take your medicine
  • scorpio: uh, do whatever you want, i'm super DEAD
  • sagittarius: imagine what gon' happen when you try to tax our whiskey
  • capricorn: welcome to the present, we're running a real nation
  • aquarius: damn, you're in worse shape than the national debt is in
  • pisces: but sir, do we not fight for freedom?
10 things I learned from APUSH (as non-American student)

1. Andrew Jackson needs to stop
2. Jefferson really liked farmers and France
3. Hamilton liked national debts (he must be very content now) but then died
4. Pauvre Native Americans
5. IF YOU FEEL LIKE YOUR LIFE IS A FAILURE, JUST THINK OF HENRY CLAY, WHO RAN FOR PRESIDENT 5 TIMES BUT NEVER GOT ELECTED
6. Henry Clay never dies
7. so many compromises and panics
8. don’t go to the South
9. FDR was very productive (*cough cough* Hoover can you even pronounce laissez-faire like the French)
10. At some point Democrats stopped being racist and Republicans took over

3

2 May 1816 – Wedding of Princess Charlotte of Wales and Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld

In the evening, while Leopold held a dinner for few gentlemen at Clarence House, Charlotte went down to Buckingham House, dined with the Queen and then went upstairs to change into her wedding dress. Outside the escort of Lifeguards assembled, and the band of the Coldstream Gards and a guard of honour from the Grenadier Guards marched down to the courtyard of Carlton House. Inside Carlton House, guests were assembling beneath huge, hot, low-hanging chandeliers in the heavily gilded Crimson Drawing Room, where the ceremony was to be conducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Just before nine o’clock, Charlotte came out of Buckingham House, climbed into an open carriage and drove the short distance down the Mall with the Queen sitting beside her and her aunts Augusta and Elizabeth sitting opposite. “Bless me, what a crowd”, she said. Charlotte’s dress cost over £10,000. It was a white and silver slip, covered with transparent silk net embroidered in silver lamé with shells and flowers. The sleeves were trimmed with Brussels lace, and the train, which was six feet long, was made of the same material as the slip and fastened like a cloack with a diamond clasp. She wore a wreath of diamond leaves and roses, a diamond necklace and diamond earrings, both of which had been given to her by her father, and a diamond bracelet that had been given by Leopold. 

The ceremony was short and dignified - except for Charlotte’s slight giggle when Leopold promised to endow her with all his worldly goods. When it was over, Charlotte and Leopold stayed only long enough for the guests to drink their health. Then they left to change. Church bells pealed. Bonfires were lit. Field guns cracked their salute in St James’s Park, and far down river the cannons at the Tower of London boomed. 

Charlotte & Leopold: the true romance of the Prince Regent’s daughter by James Chambers.

bbc.co.uk
Why gay French men are voting far right
The main gay district in Paris is full of bars, clubs and sex shops - not a place you'd expect to find support for banning same-sex marriage.

“But for me there are more pressing issues [than homosexuality] like the economy, the national debt and unemployment.”

“Where are the gays most in danger? In Islamic countries,” says Pascale, who doesn’t want to be photographed.

“Gay people are being crucified - it’s a danger and I don’t want it coming to France, definitely not.”

“I don’t want to say this, but I feel like a lot of LGBT people are very selfish. They feel like they’re not targets for the FN any more so they think it’s OK to vote for them.”

BBC investigates why gay men are increasingly supporting Le Pen,
Finds out gay men are all selfish racists

@balddudesrock BEING GENOCIDAL OR A SLAVEOWNER AUTOMATICALLY OUTWEIGHS ANY GOOD YOU MIGHT HAVE DONE IN THE WORLD IN THE SAME WAY THAT “JUST ONE” SEVERED HUMAN FINGER RUINS AN OTHERWISE GOOD BOWL OF CHILI.

IF YOU ARE GENOCIDAL, A SLAVEOWNER, OR A MURDERER, THAT IS ALL YOU ARE ALLOWED TO BE, FULL GODDAMN STOP. TALKING ABOUT HOW ANDREW JACKSON DIDN’T HAVE A NATIONAL DEBT IS LIKE SAYING JOHN WAYNE GACY WAS A PRETTY GOOD BIRTHDAY CLOWN – EVEN IF IT’S TRUE IT IS A FOOTNOTE COMPARED TO THE HORRIBLE THINGS HE CHOSE TO DO AND SUPPORT.

ANDREW JACKSON IS ALL EVIL. THERE IS NOTHING GOOD ABOUT HIM. ANY BENEFITS OF HIS PRESIDENCY ARE LIKE A SINGLE SKITTLE IN AN OLYMPIC SIZED SWIMMING POOL FULL OF HUMAN EXCREMENT, AND WHEN YOU TALK ABOUT HOW GOOD THAT ONE SKITTLE TASTES, IT MAKES ME ASK THE QUESTION “WHY ARE YOU WILLING TO EAT A SKITTLE THAT’S BEEN SUBMERGED IN FECES?”

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WHY WE SHOULD ABOLISH THE DEBT CEILING 

Congressional Democrats have pulled a fast one on Republicans by striking a deal with Trump to raise the federal debt ceiling only until the end of the year. This will give them bargaining leverage in December to strike a bigger bargain with Republicans: Democrats will agree to raise the debt ceiling then in return for Republican cooperation on legalizing Dreamers (unauthorized immigrants brought into the U.S. as children), making small but necessary fixes in the Affordable Care act, and other things Democrats seek.  

Raising the debt ceiling is always a political football, used by whichever party is in the minority to extract concessions from the majority party or from the majority party’s president.

The debt ceiling is how much the government is allowed to borrow. It shouldn’t be a political football. It should be abolished. It serves absolutely no purpose.

When the debt ceiling was first adopted in 1917, it might have been a useful way to prevent a president from spending however much he wanted. But since 1974, Congress has had a formal budget process to control spending and the taxes needed to finance it.

There’s no reason for Congress to authorize borrowing for spending that Congress has already approved, especially when a failure to lift the debt ceiling would be so horrific.

Having a debt ceiling doesn’t discipline government, anyway. The national debt is obligations government has already made to those who lent it money. Discipline has to do with setting spending limits and legislating tax increases, not penalizing the lenders.

Which is why most modern democracies don’t have debt ceilings. Britain, France, Germany, Canada, Australia – they do just fine without explicit borrowing limits.

Even more basically, the nation’s debt is a meaningless figure without reference to the size of the overall economy and the pace of economic growth.

After World War II, America’s debt was larger than our entire Gross Domestic Product, but we grew so much so fast in the 1950s and 1960s that the debt kept shrinking in proportion. 

Today’s debt is about 77 percent of our total national product. The reason it’s a problem is it’s growing faster than the economy is growing, so it’s on the way to becoming larger and larger in proportion.

This is what we ought to be focusing on. Fighting over whether or not to raise the debt ceiling is a meaningless and dangerous distraction. So abolish it.

Let us use this day to remember the atrocities suffered by Filipinos under the Martial Law.

September 21, 1972

The late President Marcos declared Martial Law in the Philippines. The whole country was under the Proclamation 1081, which suspended civil rights and imposed military authority.

Under the 20 years of Marcos Regime (9 years under Martial Law), there are more or less 75,730 reported victims of Human Rights violations.

70,000 people incarcerated

34,000 tortured

3,257 killed

398 desaparecidos

$10 Billion estimated ill-gotten wealth

P395.51 Billion National Debt

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

#NEVERAGAIN

Economics

What is the unemployment rate?
>Is the rate going up, going down, or steady?

Does your setting have a minimum wage?
>What types of jobs does this apply to?
>How frequently does the minimum wage change?
>>Who decides when it changes, and by how much?

What is the average household income?

What were the average household expenditures?

What taxes exist?

What is imported into your setting?
>How much is imported/how much do these imports cost?
>What are the top three imported things?
How much is exported/how much do theses exports earn?
>What are the top three exports?
>How is the trade doing within the land?

How is international trade doing?

How is the job market?
>Is there a good supply of entry-level jobs?
>Is there a good supply of upper-level jobs?
>Are there any education requirements for jobs that will provide a livable wage?
>>What are those requirements?
>Are there jobs for people with lower formal education?

How much debt does the average household have?
>Is the debt getting larger, smaller, or staying the same?

How much debt does the city/state/local area that your story takes place in have?
>Is the debt getting larger, smaller, or staying the same?

How much debt does the nation/country/kingdom that your story takes place in have?
>Is the debt getting larger, smaller, or staying the same?