dean-rusk

washingtonpost.com
The U.S. war crime North Korea won’t forget
Pyongyang’s hatred of America is partly based on U.S. actions during the Korean War.

The hate, though, is not all manufactured. It is rooted in a fact-based narrative, one that North Korea obsessively remembers and the United States blithely forgets.

The story dates to the early 1950s, when the U.S. Air Force, in response to the North Korean invasion that started the Korean War, bombed and napalmed cities, towns and villages across the North. It was mostly easy pickings for the Air Force, whose B-29s faced little or no opposition on many missions.

The bombing was long, leisurely and merciless, even by the assessment of America’s own leaders. “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, told the Office of Air Force History in 1984. Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.” After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the later stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

Although the ferocity of the bombing was criticized as racist and unjustified elsewhere in the world, it was never a big story back home. U.S. press coverage of the air war focused, instead, on “MiG alley,” a narrow patch of North Korea near the Chinese border. There, in the world’s first jet-powered aerial war, American fighter pilots competed against each other to shoot down five or more Soviet-made fighters and become “aces.” War reporters rarely mentioned civilian casualties from U.S. carpet-bombing. It is perhaps the most forgotten part of a forgotten war.

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Does there exist any old Korean map which depicted Takeshima/Dokdo? (by GloriousJapanForever)

This territorial dispute between Japan and South Korea over Takeshima(Dokdo) is quite simple.

1. There is no historical fact that Korea had ever exercised any “effective control” over the islets prior to 1905.
2. Japan officially incorporated the islets in 1905 strictly following the procedures prescribed in the International law.
3. After the WW2, the Allies determined that Takeshima/Dokdo should remain as Japanese territory in the San Francisco Peace Treaty in 1951.
4. Though the South Korean government had been informed of the determination by the U.S. government in those diplomatic documents like “Rusk documents”, they ignored this international determination and started occupying the islets illegally from 1952.

Korea killed over 50 Japanese people back in ’50s when they took over the island belonged to Japan for long time. Korea escapes from a dispute at the international UN court over the teritorial conflict since they know Korea shall be lost.

Recalling a trip to India and Pakistan with her sister, Lee Radziwill, in 1962, Mrs. Kennedy says she was so appalled by what she considered to be the gaucherie of the newly appointed United States ambassador to Pakistan, Walter McConaughy, that before even completing her descent from the Khyber Pass, she wrote a letter to her husband alerting him to “what a hopeless ambassador McConaughy was for Pakistan, and all the reasons and all the things I thought the ambassador should be.”

She even named possible replacements.

“And Jack was so impressed by that letter,” she tells Mr. Schlesinger, that he showed it to Dean Rusk, the secretary of state (whom Mrs. Kennedy disparages as apathetic and indecisive). According to her account, Mr. Kennedy said to Mr. Rusk, “This is the kind of letter I should be getting from the inspectors of embassies.”

JFK’s & LBJ’s Secretary of State, Dean Rusk, was in France in the mid 60′s when Frances President Charles De Gaulle decided to pull out of NATO.  De Gaulle said he wanted all US Military out of France as soon as possible.

Rusk responded “Does that include those who are buried here?“

Photo - US cemetery in Normandy, France where 10,000 Americans are buried.