deaf-people

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The 2011 Korean film “Silenced” is based on actual events that took place at Gwangju Inhwa School for the hearing-impaired, where deaf children were the victims of repeated physical and sexual assaults by faculty members over a period of five years in the early 2000s.

A newly appointed teacher at the school alerted human rights groups in 2005, and was subsequently fired from his job. This teacher was the first to come forward about the abuse he’d witnessed, as the school specifically sought out poorer teachers who would be completely dependent on the school for their financial security and therefore less likely to turn against the administration. 

Nine children eventually came forward, but more victims were believed to have concealed additional crimes in fear of repercussions or because of trauma. Children who were orphans or who had disabled parents were targeted specifically, and children who tried to come forward were sent back to school and disciplined by the faculty.

During the trial, the perpetrators received support from the local community, especially from the police and churches in the community. Of the six perpetrators, four received prison sentences, while the other two were freed immediately because the statute of limitations for their crimes had expired. Among those jailed, two were released after less than a year in jail. Four of the six teachers were reinstated in the school.

The film sparked public outrage after its 2011 release, which eventually resulted in a reopening of investigations into the incidents. The school was shut down, and several of the teachers pleaded guilty to sexual molestation charges, including the former principal, who was sentenced to twelve years in prison. The demand for legislative reform eventually reached its way to the National Assembly of South Korea, where a bill (named after the film) was unanimously passed in October 2011 to abolish the statute of limitations for all sex crimes against minors and the disabled.

The film’s ending scene is a protest that occurred following the suicide of a thirteen-year-old victim after the trial in 2005. As the crowd of human rights advocates and deaf people face brutality from the riot police, the fired teacher who initially came forward (who, along with a human rights activist, helped the victims through the trial process) repeats the name of the victim who’d committed suicide, saying “he cannot hear or speak.”

Talk fantasy prosthetics to me.

An elf maiden dances on feet of living wood sung into shape, planted in soil and watered when she takes them off. Every year she plants the old ones and sings a new pair. (Incidentally, the pair of peach saplings from three years ago have produced an excellent crop- She makes preserves from them, and despite the inevitable jokes about “toe-jam”, they are appreciated.)

A dwarf king has a metal fist, all tiny gears and fine wires, kept wound by a mischievous mine-spirit bound to the spring as punishment- the more it struggles, the tighter the spring. 

An orc chieftaness is regularly asked for the story of how she earned the name Wyrmthrottler- she boasts of how she strangled the dragon that ate her arm, and had her shaman make a new arm from its bones, with its fangs as the fingers.

A necromancer simply re-attached his old leg bones- Sacrificing a few mice each day keeps it going.

A pirate captain lost her arm to a shark attack: a passing selkie saved her, and gave her tattoos of kraken blood. Now she has an arm made of salt-water, that grows and wanes with the tides, and swings a cutlass as well as the original. (She doesn’t sail as far these days though: she doesn’t want her wife to worry.)

A wandering swordsman was broken at the waist- his ancestral armour allows him to walk again, as long as he keeps it polished, and burns incense to the ancestors regularly.

A high priestess has an eye made from a crystal ball- to predict the future, all she has to do is wink.

A bard was struck deaf by illness- he struck a deal with the god of music. Now he wears hearing-trumpets made from his old pipes, and dedicates his every song to the god of music- the better he plays, the better his hearing. (It is said his music could make statues weep, and he can hear a mouse fart at 60 paces.)

A princess has the arm of a golem, enchanted clay with mystic words carved in- her music tutor despairs of how her harp playing has become even worse, but her calligraphy tutor is ecstatic over her handwriting.

A goblin pickpocket has an arm made of whatever he steals- no-one feels his fingers, and even if they did, they couldn’t find their possessions amongst all the rest.  

A witch has eyes made from shadow and starlight, given to her in a game with a demon. Nobody dares to ask what she wagered- they aren’t even sure she won.

A warg was born deaf and blind- his people learned of his power when the nearest birds started staring at them, and dogs pricked up their ears as he walked past.

Cheer Up Post #4847 - Spring Awakening (Deaf West) Edition

For the anon requesting the revival of Spring Awakening by Deaf West Theatre, enjoy!

***Disclaimer: Most of the images used do not belong to me. If you see one that’s yours, and you would like credit or to have it removed/replaced, please just ask.

Want your own Cheer Up Post? Find out how. Or see the others.

How to Deaf Culture

I’m about to go attend a deaf event, so I decided to write this quick little list! A lot of my followers don’t know any ASL or even what ASL is (American Sign Language) , so here’s a guide for if you’re ever around Deaf people and how to respect them!


  •  DO NOT use the term “hearing impaired”. Good willed people like to use it for political correctness, but to the Deaf Community, it’s offensive because they are proud to be Deaf. They embrace their deafness and the lifestyle that comes with it.
  • TAP, don’t YELL. Yes, unbelievable, I know. They’re deaf. So yelling in their faces won’t help you or them one bit. Besides that, waving obnoxiously to get a deaf persons’ attention is also rude. Simply give a little tap on the shoulder to alert them, unless you’re facing their front! If coming up from behind, give a little tap! If not, a small wave will be fine.
  • ASL is not a direct translation of English. It is its’ own language, something like Korean or Mandarin or French and so forth. ASL has its own grammar structure and rules, so signing direct English is technically incorrect. If you accidently sign in PSE (pigeon-signed-english) which is direct translation, whoever you are signing with will most likely remind you/correct you to sign in the technical structure.
  • ASL is not universal. There is no count of how many signed languages there are, just like how it’s difficult to get an accurate number of spoken languages! The point is, there is British Sign Language, German Sign Language, Japanese Sign Language, and so on and so forth. For Deaf who go overseas frequently or attend international meetings, there is an improvised form of sign language, but not so much that it is a learned sign language.
  • If using an interpreter, talk directly to the deaf person. Facing the interpreter is like saying that the deaf person is not there, which is extremely rude. The interpreter will catch on and interpret even if you’re not facing them, that’s their job.
  • Breaking eye contact is rude. In the hearing world, eye contact isn’t as important because we can look at one thing but still listen to the speaker. In the deaf world, eye contact must be made while conversing to show respect.
  • “S…L…O…W…L…Y” is a no.  Many deaf persons can read lips. Does that mean you should mouth every syllable of a word at a snails’ pace when talking to a deaf person? No. It’s like having the same done to you. Also, though it may be done with good intentions, it often comes off as stuck-up/having the higher power. Speak normally.
  • Don’t be scared! The Deaf Community loves to sign and help students learning ASL. If you have basic knowledge of it, then approach them politely and introduce yourself! Especially if at a deaf event, Deaf are more than happy to warmly greet you and sign. There’s no need to hold back! Just remember that Deaf Culture is different from Hearing.


I encourage you to learn ASL/your countrys’ sign language if you’re curious! Learn from classes, because online diagrams will not give you the correct forms. Sign language is a beautiful form of communication , along with the people in the community! Remember, every culture has its differences, and Deaf Culture is no exception!

It is not cute for a hearing person to learn sign language for a Deaf person they have fallen in love with. It’s necessary

It’s not cute to specifically try and find a deaf boyfriend just so you can be like Bay and Emmet from switched at birth

It’s not cute to “aww” when a person says they are deaf

It’s not cute to assume we are somehow lesser than you because we can’t hear

Soulmate Voice AU

The voice you’re reading this text in right now is probably your own, but, what if it wasn’t? What if it was your soulmate’s?

  • Everyone has a voice in their head they hear when they read anything; books, texts, emails, tumblr posts, etc.
  • They know the voice isn’t their own.
  • Even though science can’t explain it, the voice ends up being someone’s love of their love, or as it’s been put, soulmate.
  • What’s even more curious is when someone’s soulmate can’t speak, they don’t hear a voice when they speak, but see images.
  • These images are usually along the lines of sign language.
  • Every word is perfectly translated, not just to any sign language, but their soulmate’s sign language. All the shortcuts, and they can feel their facial expressions because they make them on their own face when they read.
  • The voice in their head is the same voice their soulmate will have when they meet them.
  • After they meet them, the voice in their head will change with their soulmate’s.
  • There are sometimes, when someone just can’t read, the words mix up, because they don’t really understand what’s going with their head when it comes to their soulmate’s ‘voice’.
  • Lucky for those people, once they meet their soulmate, their soulmate recognizes them by their voice and helps them understand their own ‘voice’.
  • Now, just imagine person A doesn’t hear a voice but instead they see hand gestures.
  • Everyone was telling A that the voice they heard when they read was their soulmate’s voice, but since their wasn’t a voice and no told them how deaf or mute people’s soulmate’s read A thought that the hand gestures meant they just weren’t meant to have a soulmate.
  • A studied the hand gestures until they became a second language to them.
  • Person B was deaf and because of that they thought the voice in their head was their own or something along those lines, because in the town B grew up in believed deaf people didn’t have soulmates.
  • B’s family moved to the city, the one A lived in.
  • It was in the first few weeks when A and B were put together for a partner project with C.
  • B signed to A and C that he was deaf and was sorry for the interrupter and before his interrupter could even translate A signed, “That’s alright and there’s no need to be sorry.”
  • B is shocked at this and signs excitedly and the two started a long conversation where is C would have stopped if it hadn’t been adorable. Besides, C knew they were soulmates and that’s what they thought they were talking about.
  • A few years pass and A and B have become inseparable with C still as one of their other friends.
  • A’s voice changes a bit and so does B’s head voice but, B already feels like a crazy outsider because of their ears, they keep quiet not wanting to be more of one.
  • A, B and C are together at one of their houses and C starts to talk excitedly because the new kid in their school is their soulmate.
  • A looks sad and B looks angry about C’s chatter. C signs what’s wrong and after a few minutes of both explaining their side C looks at them in disbelief.
  • After C explains how deaf people find their soulmate and makes it clear that A and B are soulmates they leave to give them some privacy.
  • A and B look at each other and B just breaks down. After being told all their life a soulmate was impossible for them they finally understand. They finally know that it’s possible and it’s already happened.
  • Once B, and A cause they’ve been telling themselves a soulmate couldn’t happen for them, stop the tears A signs, “Does it suck that you’ll hear one voice for your entire life?”
  • B let out a silent laugh and signs, “It doesn’t suck at all because it’s your voice and that’s the only voice I ever want to hear.”

This was so fun to write I hope you all enjoyed! Feel free to reblog and edit this to your OTPs.

Stop Craptions.

Okay so I’ve made a post about this before but this is just getting ridiculous. Actually, the post I made before regards the same freaking video I’m going to talk about now. This has to do with closed captioning. After my little rant in my other post about how big youtubers like Markiplier and Jacksepticeye have people writing captions for them and inserting stupid jokes and unnecessary commentary, there were edits made to the CC in the video I specifically talked about. A good start, but not revolutionary. 

I went back to watch that video tonight because it’s one of my favourite videos, and the captions have somehow gotten WORSE. Not only is there stupid commentary, but now there’s jokes that are actually offensive. 

(For context, they are doing the Whisper Challenge).

For YEARS people in the Deaf community have been trying to end the stigma/stereotype of deaf = dumb and then this BS rolls around. I’m just.. I’m just so done.

I shouldn’t have to turn the CC off for some of my favourite youtubers simply because they’re obnoxious, distracting, and/or offensive. I shouldn’t have to struggle to understand videos because I had to turn the CC off. So, to those who write captions for youtubers, please do it right oh my god. If you want to add commentary, do so in the comments like you’re supposed to. Otherwise you’re ruining it for a lot of people, and not just in the Deaf community. People who don’t have English as their first language, people with auditory processing disorder, people with ADD, etc. You’re ruining their youtube experience “for the lolz”. 

I just wish youtube had regulations for CC like television does. This shouldn’t be an issue. 

For more information about CC and “craptions”, check out @rikkipoynter​. 

There are Slytherins who pluck petals from the daisy stems and giggle at love. Who write poetry about the stars and sunsets. There are Slytherins who are afraid of getting their ears pierced. Slytherins who wear bright colors: greens, and yellows, and pinks. There are Slytherins who cry, and there are Slytherins who will smile through the pain regardless. There are Slytherins who always make sure to perfect their makeup and Slytherins who wear slippers into public. There are Slytherins who names their cats after everyday objects and Slytherins who hate rainy weather. Slytherins who love the sun and those who wish that it were winter. There are Slytherins who wear nothing but t-shirts and Slytherins who wear lace and love to write in cursive, but there is no doubt that they are all Slytherins.

There are Hufflepuffs who sport skinned knees and scabbing knuckles. Who know how to throw a punch and aren’t afraid of starting a fight. There are Hufflepuffs who love diamond earrings and red lipstick. Hufflepuffs who stay up until 2 AM reading. There are Hufflepuffs who hide in the corners during social interactions, and there are Hufflepuffs who won’t bat an eye at being the center of attention. There are Hufflepuffs with tattoos snaking down their arms and Hufflepuffs who can’t stand waiting in line. There are Hufflepuffs who collect pressed flowers and Hufflepuffs who are afraid of bees. Hufflepuffs who are always smiling and those who aren’t. There are Hufflepuffs who see movies alone and Hufflepuffs who go to coffee shops every day with their friends, but one is never less of a Hufflepuff than another.

There are Ravenclaws who sleep for hours on end beneath a cocoon of blankets. Who wear socks that don’t match and drink too much coffee. There are Ravenclaws who slam books down with frustration. Ravenclaws who love running, and hikes, and physical activity. There are Ravenclaws who don’t understand chemistry, and there are Ravenclaws who can explain the science behind black holes as though it was the plot to their favorite movie. There are Ravenclaws who love wearing combat boots and Ravenclaws who adore jewelry. There are Ravenclaws who chew their nails when they’re nervous and Ravenclaws with perfect manicures. Ravenclaws who trip over their own feet and those who walk with certain poise. There are Ravenclaws who wear cozy sweaters to evade the cold and Ravenclaws who marvel at snowflakes, but despite their differences, they always know that they are Ravenclaws.

There are Gryffindors who spend hours in the morning perfecting their makeup. Whose high heels click as they walk down the sidewalk. There are Gryffindors who love asking questions. Gryffindors who like to paint and wear flowy skirts. There are Gryffindors who sing and play the violin, and there are Gryffindors so terribly tone deaf that people ask them to be quiet. There are Gryffindors who study ancient history and Gryffindors who are afraid of heights. There are Gryffindors who get lost easily and Gryffindors who are easily carsick. Gryffindors who think before they speak and those who say the first thing that comes to mind. There are Gryffindors who love wearing necklaces and bracelets and Gryffindors who doodle on their bare arms whenever they get bored, but no matter what, they are Gryffindors to the core.


♥ Inspired by this ask ♥

Reblog if 2017 is the year we stop interrogating d/Deaf/HoH people

If a d/Deaf/HoH person tells you that they are d/Deaf/HoH, you believe them. No questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH person wants to communicate orally with/or without lip reading, using sign language, gesturing, cued speech, using their cell phone, or pen and paper, you respect their decision. No questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH person speaks, do not comment on the “quality” or “tone” of their speech. If they choose to speak to communicate that’s their choice, no matter how it may sound to you. No compliments given, no criticism given, and again, no questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH people talks/listens on the phone, uses hearing aids/cochlear implants, speaks clearly, grew up hearing, reads lips, etc, you will respect what they tell you about their being d/Deaf/HoH. No questions asked.

2017 is already an amazing year for equality, support, solidarity, and inclusion. Let’s band together to make the lives of d/Deaf/HoH people a little easier, and allow them to breathe easier when communicating with hearing people. 

Please reblog and add your own “d/Deaf/HoH No Questions asked”! I want to see what y’all have to say! 

Keep reading

ASL should be taught in schools

Like seriously I think ASL (American sign language) or any type of sign language should be a language choice in school. Just knowing the basics could really help and I think it’s important for hearing (non deaf) people to maybe know a few basic signs. I’ve seen more and more people learning it and I think it’s amazing. It would just be really cool if it was a language choice at schools.