deaf-and-hard-of-hearing

A song?

I got my cochlear implant at the age of around 2 years old. I remember when I was maybe no older than 3 or 4 years, and the radio was on in the car. I turned it up, and my mother started moving to the beat of some sort and looking at me…

It was all static to me. If there were words being sung, I didn’t hear it. It was just all radio static. My mom later told me that she never listened to the radio, because I couldn’t comprehend it and she didn’t think she deserved it because I couldn’t hear it… 

There was one song that made it click for me. It was in the 4th grade and my dad bought a Johnny Cash Cd to listen to in the car rides. He put on Ring of Fire and he sang along with it. I was able to put my dad’s words to Johnny Cash’s voice and understand what he was singing. That was the only song I listened to for a long while. There was something about Johnny Cash’s voice that was clear and easy to hear. I listened to other songs of his. For some reason, my brain clicked and I slowly started picking up words from other songs on the Cd and even the radio.  Today, I can pick words up on the radio and sing along. I also look up on the Internet later on. But Ring of Fire will always have my heart forever. Is a special song that has yours?

10

Watch: Nyle DiMarco reminds voters what’s at stake on election day for people with disabilities

[Nyle DiMarco signing] You can keep this ad muted if you want and keep scrolling past it. But if you’re still listening to my voice, please know that there are a lot of people out there without one. Among the 50 million Americans living with a disability, many don’t have the ability to work, to travel, or to do countless other things you might take for granted. So this November, please consider voting for the only candidate with a plan to change that.

5

Deaf Awareness Week is upon us here in the UK! :D These pictures highlight the importance of lip-reading for Deaf and hard of hearing people all over the world…

We hate it when people mumble

we hate it when people cover their mouths

we hate it when people shout thinking we’ll hear better

we hate it when more than one person speak to us at the same time

we hate it when people do speak clearly….

BUT we do love it when people make the effort to talk clearly to us :)

Happy Deaf Awareness week!!

xx

It is hard to tell in this photograph, but Ariel was signing to me! I am hard of hearing and there are times where I have to use ASL for communication. My mom told her that I couldn’t hear and immediately she turned asking (in sign), “You are deaf?”. I started sobbing, ugly happy sobs. In the time slot allotted we signed the entire time and it made my trip to Disney absolutely incredible. Think about that. Five minutes of just being able to communicate with a character made the long plane ride, long car ride, etc. worth it. The bonus is that Ariel is my favorite Disney princess. I felt included in a world that is tailored to the “norm” and it meant the world.

Stop Craptions.

Okay so I’ve made a post about this before but this is just getting ridiculous. Actually, the post I made before regards the same freaking video I’m going to talk about now. This has to do with closed captioning. After my little rant in my other post about how big youtubers like Markiplier and Jacksepticeye have people writing captions for them and inserting stupid jokes and unnecessary commentary, there were edits made to the CC in the video I specifically talked about. A good start, but not revolutionary. 

I went back to watch that video tonight because it’s one of my favourite videos, and the captions have somehow gotten WORSE. Not only is there stupid commentary, but now there’s jokes that are actually offensive. 

(For context, they are doing the Whisper Challenge).

For YEARS people in the Deaf community have been trying to end the stigma/stereotype of deaf = dumb and then this BS rolls around. I’m just.. I’m just so done.

I shouldn’t have to turn the CC off for some of my favourite youtubers simply because they’re obnoxious, distracting, and/or offensive. I shouldn’t have to struggle to understand videos because I had to turn the CC off. So, to those who write captions for youtubers, please do it right oh my god. If you want to add commentary, do so in the comments like you’re supposed to. Otherwise you’re ruining it for a lot of people, and not just in the Deaf community. People who don’t have English as their first language, people with auditory processing disorder, people with ADD, etc. You’re ruining their youtube experience “for the lolz”. 

I just wish youtube had regulations for CC like television does. This shouldn’t be an issue. 

For more information about CC and “craptions”, check out @rikkipoynter​. 

Reblog if 2017 is the year we stop interrogating d/Deaf/HoH people

If a d/Deaf/HoH person tells you that they are d/Deaf/HoH, you believe them. No questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH person wants to communicate orally with/or without lip reading, using sign language, gesturing, cued speech, using their cell phone, or pen and paper, you respect their decision. No questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH person speaks, do not comment on the “quality” or “tone” of their speech. If they choose to speak to communicate that’s their choice, no matter how it may sound to you. No compliments given, no criticism given, and again, no questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH people talks/listens on the phone, uses hearing aids/cochlear implants, speaks clearly, grew up hearing, reads lips, etc, you will respect what they tell you about their being d/Deaf/HoH. No questions asked.

2017 is already an amazing year for equality, support, solidarity, and inclusion. Let’s band together to make the lives of d/Deaf/HoH people a little easier, and allow them to breathe easier when communicating with hearing people. 

Please reblog and add your own “d/Deaf/HoH No Questions asked”! I want to see what y’all have to say! 

Keep reading

In its 152-year history, Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. never had a deaf female president — until a year ago. Roberta Cordano is the first deaf woman to lead the school.

Gallaudet is a liberal arts university devoted to deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Classes are taught in American Sign Language, and all students and faculty are required to know how to sign.

But president Cordano never attended a deaf school herself.

“I grew up during a period of time when it was believed that American Sign Language was what they called a monkey language,” Cordano says, speaking through an interpreter provided by Gallaudet. While the interpreter translates rapidly, Cordano whispers out faintly in English as she signs.

Gallaudet President Navigates From World Of Hearing To Sound Leadership Of The Deaf

GIF: Becky Harlan/NPR

So you think I can hear..?

 “You’re not really d/Deaf/HOH, you hear me just fine.”

If I had a dime for everyone who’s ever told me that…                                       Here’s what’s more than likely happening during what you perceive as me “hearing”:

1. I’m relying solely on social cues. Luckily for us d/Deaf/HOH, 93% of communicaton is non-verbal. Basically if you laugh, I laugh, and no one ever knows I missed the joke (..again).

2. I’ve known the speaker for a long time. We all have those topics we can (and do) talk about for hours on end. And the longer I’ve known you, the better I’ll be able to use your favorite topics to figure out what you’re saying.

3. ‘Neutral’ answers. “Yeah”, “No”, “I don’t know”, “Yeah, I get that”.. I’ve got a whole list of responses that can easily trick you into believing I have some idea of what you’re saying.

4. Mad Libs. Did you ever play mad libs as a kid? You know the one.. every so many words you insert a random one and you get a story that doesn’t make any sense? Yeah, being d/Deaf/HOH is pretty much just like that. 

5. Silence. You probably didn’t notice, you almost never do, but I haven’t said a word in 20 minutes. I gave up on trying to understand this conversation a long time ago and I’m really just planning what I’m gonna eat later.

6. Again with the social cues. Remember that whole non-verbal communication thing? Yeah, I probably use it even more than you do. Head nodding, and smiling works like a charm to get a girl through your incoherent story telling.

7. Just this once.. On this rare occasion I actually heard what you said; that happens sometimes.. But you’re still a jerk for dismissing my struggles, feelings, and identity.