anonymous asked:

Unpopular opinion: people headcanoning Gren as censoring amaya's language is :// bc they Deaf community is censored a lot, or people censor things for Deaf people (like closed captions saying freak or heck when the characters said fuck or hell)

i don’t know much about deaf culture but if this is a Thing… oof :/

2

This gifset shows how Gabriella gives Ariel a sign name based on her long hair, notice how she use the first letter of Ariel’s name in sign form (letter ‘A’) to ‘write/draw’ with both hands the hair of our favorite redhead. 

In Deaf culture and sign language, a sign name (or a name sign) is a special sign that is used to uniquely identify a person, just like a name. 

Name signs come in all forms. Some are based on the person’s birth name or initials. Some are based on their physical features or personality traits. And other name signs might be based on the person’s interests.


How to Deaf Culture

I’m about to go attend a deaf event, so I decided to write this quick little list! A lot of my followers don’t know any ASL or even what ASL is (American Sign Language) , so here’s a guide for if you’re ever around Deaf people and how to respect them!


  •  DO NOT use the term “hearing impaired”. Good willed people like to use it for political correctness, but to the Deaf Community, it’s offensive because they are proud to be Deaf. They embrace their deafness and the lifestyle that comes with it.
  • TAP, don’t YELL. Yes, unbelievable, I know. They’re deaf. So yelling in their faces won’t help you or them one bit. Besides that, waving obnoxiously to get a deaf persons’ attention is also rude. Simply give a little tap on the shoulder to alert them, unless you’re facing their front! If coming up from behind, give a little tap! If not, a small wave will be fine.
  • ASL is not a direct translation of English. It is its’ own language, something like Korean or Mandarin or French and so forth. ASL has its own grammar structure and rules, so signing direct English is technically incorrect. If you accidently sign in PSE (pigeon-signed-english) which is direct translation, whoever you are signing with will most likely remind you/correct you to sign in the technical structure.
  • ASL is not universal. There is no count of how many signed languages there are, just like how it’s difficult to get an accurate number of spoken languages! The point is, there is British Sign Language, German Sign Language, Japanese Sign Language, and so on and so forth. For Deaf who go overseas frequently or attend international meetings, there is an improvised form of sign language, but not so much that it is a learned sign language.
  • If using an interpreter, talk directly to the deaf person. Facing the interpreter is like saying that the deaf person is not there, which is extremely rude. The interpreter will catch on and interpret even if you’re not facing them, that’s their job.
  • Breaking eye contact is rude. In the hearing world, eye contact isn’t as important because we can look at one thing but still listen to the speaker. In the deaf world, eye contact must be made while conversing to show respect.
  • “S…L…O…W…L…Y” is a no.  Many deaf persons can read lips. Does that mean you should mouth every syllable of a word at a snails’ pace when talking to a deaf person? No. It’s like having the same done to you. Also, though it may be done with good intentions, it often comes off as stuck-up/having the higher power. Speak normally.
  • Don’t be scared! The Deaf Community loves to sign and help students learning ASL. If you have basic knowledge of it, then approach them politely and introduce yourself! Especially if at a deaf event, Deaf are more than happy to warmly greet you and sign. There’s no need to hold back! Just remember that Deaf Culture is different from Hearing.


I encourage you to learn ASL/your countrys’ sign language if you’re curious! Learn from classes, because online diagrams will not give you the correct forms. Sign language is a beautiful form of communication , along with the people in the community! Remember, every culture has its differences, and Deaf Culture is no exception!

Baby Driver and His Headphones

In the movie “Baby Driver”, Baby (the main character) wears headphones pretty much the whole time in an attempt to drown out the ringing of his tinnitus. He developed tinnitus from a car accident that resulted in the death of his parents.

I’ve been noticing some people are confused by this as he can still understand everything going on around him, despite the fact he has headphones in with the music loud. He is actually reading lips, using subtext, and mood.

I am hard of hearing. I get massive headaches from my ears and brain trying to discern and make sense of all the sounds around me. If you know me, you know I wear my headphones basically 24/7. I do the exact same thing Baby does. I am able to understand practically everything, even with my music turned up all the way. If you watch the film, you’ll see that Baby takes out his headphones while talking to people on occasion. I do this out of habit and manners.

So yes, it is possible for people to understand what is happening with headphones in 24/7. Not all people can do it. It is a skill people with hearing loss tend to develop.

I’d also like to mention… Please, please, PLEASE do not take our headphones out. It is super rude and plain mean. Also super happy they included ASL! And another thing, I do not recommend wearing headphones 24/7. It can cause damage to your ears. In my case it doesn’t really matter, but please take care of your ears!

Originally posted by submersivemedia

Friendly reminder…

If you are hearing, and are hanging out with a group of other hearing people, with only one deaf person… please try your best not to leave the deaf person out of conversation. I know it can be difficult, especially if no one knows sign language, and/or only knows a little. Please try to include the deaf person in the conversation, try to tell them what’s going on every now and then by typing on your phone, writing on paper, etc.

Imagine eating dinner with family, everyone laughing so hard at something someone said… the deaf person asking what everyone is laughing at, only to be told it’s nothing.

DO NOT tell the deaf person, oh don’t worry about it… or it’s not important. It is important to us.

I will say it once

Being deaf is not a tragic trope for you to use in fics. You want to write a character as deaf, more power to you as long as you are accurately representing our community, which very few people are. Being deaf isn’t tragic, or something to kill yourself over. It’s a culture that we are extremely proud of. It’s not a damn romantic trope where a character loves another despite their deafness. It’s a part of who we are and those around us need to accept that.

ASL is a language

American Sign Language and other signed languages are languages. It’s important to respect them as languages.

ASL is not English. It is a completely different language. Similarly, signed languages aren’t all the same. British Sign Language is completely different from ASL.

Signs are not universal, any more than spoken words are universal. The meaning of a sign isn’t always obvious just by watching; many signs are completely arbitrary.

Sign is not pantomime, and it’s not ad hoc gesture. It’s also not like symbolic gestures that are sometimes made up to accompany kids songs either. It’s a language, with all the complexities of language. The difference is important, and it needs to be respected. 

In order to know what signs mean, you have to learn them. (Just like in order to know what spoken words mean, you have to learn them.)

ASL is not just gestures, any more than spoken languages are just sounds. ASL has grammar, vocabulary, and culture. It’s important to respect this and not erase it.  

You can’t make this up ☠️ [image Description: Top, a group of white males flashing a hand sign. Bottom, a women demonstrating the American Sign Language word for “asshole.” Text reads, Here’s a bunch of white nationalists from Orange County flashing the hand sign for “white power” which is also the American Sign Language sign for “asshole”]

DEAF AWARENESS
  •  if someone is not responding to you, they may not be just acting rude. They may actually not be able to hear you
  •  when you find out out someone is deaf, please try not to let the first words that come out of your mouth be “I’m sorry.” or “I could never live like that.” Deafness is not some terminal illness that we suffer through everyday.
  •  If you see someone struggling to communicate, please do not make them the center of attention. Trust me. The last thing I want when I can’t understand is someone pointing out that I can’t understand.
  •  if someone is struggling to communicate, and you know sign language, please ASK before you start interpreting. Yes, we appreciate the kind offer, but not everyone is comfortable with some stranger intervening. Also, not all deaf people know sign. 
  • -When you see someone with hearing loss jamming to their music in public, and you can hear it, please do not ask them to turn it down. It’s really ruse, considering it may just be loud enough for them to hear it or feel the vibrations.
  •  NEVER cover your mouth and ask if we can hear/understand you.It’s really insensitive. Most of the time, reading lips is very important for people who are deaf to communicate.
  •  Obviously, never ask how they get and keep their jobs. I feel like I shouldn’t have to explain this one.
  • Do not, DO NOT, under any circumstances, encourage or promote the use of technical devices such as hearing aids or cochlears to ANY deaf person. Many of us struggled with these devices as children. As we get older, we start to decide for ourselves if we want to use them. I respect people who their devices, but i do not respect hearing people who know nothing about them suggesting them.
  •  do not ask “if you’re deaf, how can you speak so well?” It’s basically the same kind of thing as above. many deaf children are fitted for hearing aids/cochlears and sent to speech therapy the minute their hearing parents find out. Some deaf people can speak, some people can sign and speak, and some can sign. It’s honestly their choice, and sometimes it’s not a choice.
  • if there’s anything else that you want to know, but just for a slight moment you think “I don’t want to come across as rude,” DO NOT ASK.
  • Thank you for reading. The Deaf Community would love it if these were actually followed. :)