dead things are cool

Monday 8:27am
I woke up with you on my mind.
You called me babe last night —
my heart is still pounding.

Tuesday 10:53pm
Today I realized we won’t work.
What we are is hurting her.
And I think she matters more to me than you do.

Wednesday 11:52pm
I broke things off with you today.
She barely said a word.
I’ve never regretted anything more than this.

Thursday 4:03pm
I shouldn’t have sent that message.
You shouldn’t have been so okay with receiving it.

Friday 9:57pm
I almost messaged you today.
I didn’t.

Saturday 8:49pm
I’m walking around town in search of alcohol.
They say that liquor numbs the pain of having a broken heart.
I want to put that to the test.

Sunday 2:32am
I heard you texted a girl you’ve never spoken to before.
I wonder if it’s because you’re trying to replace me.
I can’t help but wish you weren’t.
I thought I was irreplaceable.

—  a week with you on my mind, c.j.n.
8

This episode for me really highlighted and then in its dramatic finale brought to an extreme the use of perspective that Rebecca Sugar has often talked about during panels. In her rare appearances, we are almost always looking up at Rose Quartz, or she is leaning down and over our POV - be it Pearl kneeling before her hologram in Rose’s Scabbard

or Greg on a number of occasions during the early days of their relationship (We Need To Talk is a really interesting watch with regards to camera angles and how they change - Greg literally climbs a stack of crates during his attempt at communication and, well, seeing eye to eye)

or Garnet after her fateful fall in The Answer

or, hey, Buddy Buddwick collapsed in the desert in Buddy’s Book

She even has magical floating powers. It all fits, of course, with the entire running theme of the (unattainable/unmaintainable) pedestal. And even when she is not directly present, and even when it’s not the focus of the shot, her portrait can be seen overlooking the familiar setting of the beach house.

Move on, leave, run away, escape this place… but don’t forget about me, about us, about this town. Always remember where you come from so you can appreciate how far you’ve come.
—  c.j.n.