day john and paul met

What about the time we met?

Paul McCartney used to see a boy on the bus – a typical 50’s ted: “greasy hair, long sideburns, shuffling around like he was Mr Hard”, as he described him. McCartney would come across this boy on the top deck of the bus often. He also says he saw in the queue at a chip shop this same boy once.
According to Mark Lewhison, Paul sometimes reveals that he also has seen this boy during the time he was a paperboy; he even talked to him outside the newsagent’s shop – McCartney worked as a paperboy after his family moved to Forthlin Road, in summer 1956.
This boy who Paul used to come across by chance through the city was John Lennon; he attended Quarry Bank Grammar School, and in the summer of 1956, he and his friends formed a skiffle group called The Quarrymen.
The Quarrymen’s initial formation was John Lennon, Pete Shotton, Eric Griffiths and Rod Davis. Ivan Vaughan, who was neighbour and friend of Lennon and Shotton, introduced them to his school-mate from Liverpool Institute, Len Garry. Then the drummer came, Colin Hanton, who was Eric Griffiths’ neighbour and friend.

Paul attended Liverpool Institute and Ivan Vaughan was his best mate. Ivan knew that his friends from Quarry Bank would perform at St Peter’s Church’s festival in Woolton Village, on the afternoon of 6th July, 1957, so he invited Paul to go along with him to try to pick up some girls.

On the sunny Saturday afternoon of 6th July, the 15 years old Paul McCartney arrived in the fete riding his bike to meet Ivan. He saw some of the sideshows when he heard the music filling the air coming from a little Tannoy system. There was a guy with a slightly curly hair and checked shirt playing on a platform. It was John and the band; however, apparently Paul seemed has just noticed Lennon presence, as himself recalled, “He was the only outstanding member, all the rest kind of slipped away”. John sang a Doo-Wop song called Come Go With Me, by The Del Vikings, which Paul loved. Lennon just had heard it on radio, he really didn’t know all the words; so in a humorous way, he put in some stuff about penitentiaries, and McCartney thought it was interesting and intelligent. Ironically, it really was sort of an invitation to Paul to come and go with him, and they would never apart.

Later, when the first Quarrymen’s performance in that day finished, Ivan took Paul along to meet the band. The boys were sitting around a table when they came in. McCartney was dressed in a white jacket with silver details and black drainpipes trousers. As Pete Shotton recalled, “Right off, I could see John was checking this kid out. Paul came on as very attractive, very loose, very easy, very confident – wildly confident”.
Ivan introduced Paul to his friends – Len Garry he already knew, they were from the same school – but McCartney’s particular interest was John. Paul played Twenty Flight Rock by Eddie Cochran with the right chords and words, sort of humiliating these boys who earlier were literally improvising on ‘Come Go With Me’. “I could see John was very impressed”, said Pete Shotton. McCartney also realized John looked impressed, and he actually was: “I was very impressed by Paul playing ‘Twenty Flight Rock”, said John. McCartney joked it was probably because he did know the words.

After chatting some, Paul went to piano that there was in the parish hall. He remembers that “it’s when John leaned over my shoulders, contributing a deft right hand in the upper octaves and surprising me with his beery breath”. McCartney still remembers this particular detail, as he own has said, and every time he gets the opportunity of emphasising about “John’s beery breath”, he does, like on the message he sent to St Peter’s Church:

“I still remember John’s beery old breath in the day I met him for the first time. Soon I came to love his beery old breath, and I loved John”.

Paul learned to love John Lennon’s beery breath, even because they would hang out together, write songs together, share a microphone together, occasionally sleep together, and, thereafter, live their lives together.

  “The most important day in his life was the day he met me.” –Paul McCartney

  • BOSS: why didn't you show up for work yesterday?
  • me: because i don't work on holidays
  • BOSS: yesterday was July 6??
  • me: uh yeah, yesterday was the day John Lennon met Paul McCartney, July 6th, 1957.
  • He and his Quarrymen skiffle group were playing at the garden fete of St Peter's Church, Woolton, Liverpool.
  • One of John's mates was mates with Paul, so this mate introduced Paul to John. And he asked Paul to join their group, which later became wildly known as the Beatles. With the company of George and Ringo of course.
  • BOSS: .....
  • me: National Mclennon Day, duhh!
2

“The procession started outside the church, on Church Row. The lorry was pointed downhill and we were on the back of the lorry. I can still feel the lurch as the driver let the handbrake off on the way down, because you’re standing on the back of a lorry and it’s quite precarious!

“When we were going down King’s Drive, some of the other guys were playing - I don’t know why I wasn’t playing. We didn’t notice him [Rod’s Dad, James Davis] take the photograph. There’s one photograph where John is singing with his eyes closed. I’m standing, leaning against the back of the cab, and it must have been a hot, sticky day because my glasses have slipped down my nose. I’m pushing my glasses back up my nose and the banjo’s at my feet, in the case. Then we noticed it was my dad so there’s a second photograph where we’ve all turned around to look at him, but John unfortunately is obscured by Len. That particular photograph had been undiscovered from 1957 until 2009.

“Paul McCartney arrived on his bicycle and saw us playing. I met Paul in 2005, bumped into him on the seafront in Brighton. He said, “Oh, you must have been there on the day I first met John at St. Peter’s?”

“I said, “Yeah, in the famous photograph, I’m standing behind John’s right shoulder.” So he remembers it, I don’t remember him!

“Apparently at some stage during the day - and there are various contradictory versions of what happened - John and Paul were introduced by Ivan Vaughn (there doesn’t seem to be any doubt about that bit). No one invited Paul to join that night. Lennon is on record in an interview saying, “I immediately saw how fantastic he was and I asked him to join there and then!” Well, no, that didn’t happen. Pete and John were walking home because they both lived very close to each other, and John said to Pete (this is from Pete’s own mouth), “What did you think to Ivan’s friend then? Should we have him in the group?” and Pete said, “Yeah, I think he’s good. We should have him in the group.” So if Pete hadn’t said that, if Pete had said, “No, I think he’s an idiot,” then he wouldn’t have been in!

“I remember going to Aunt Mimi’s and there was somebody else there. I said to John, “Who’s that? Who’s this?” and he said, “Oh this is Paul. He’s come to listen to us practice,” so obviously by that time, he’d been invited to join the group.”

[Rod Davis, Banjo player in The Quarraymen, via The Liverpool Echo, 2017]

Photos - James Davis, taken on 6th July, 1957, the day John met Paul. (John with his eyes closed in the centre of the first photo)

MCLENNON DAY FACTS #4

When Ivan Vaughan took Paul to meet the Quarrymen, John acted a bit wary and standoffish at first while Paul seemed very confident as he played Twenty Flight Rock by Eddie Cochran to them. He knew the lyric and the chords perfectly. John was pretty impressed with him. Not satisfied yet, Paul did his own version of Be-Bop-A-Lula, which John and the boys had played earlier. “It was uncanny. He could play and sing in a way that none of us could, including John. He had such confidence, he gave a performance. It was so natural. We couldn’t get enough of it”, Eric Griffths recalls.

anonymous asked:

Hi, I am Chinese mclennon fan, and I'm new to the couple.So could you introduce me some biography about John and Paul?Thank you very much! I love you ❤️😘💕

You are welcome!

I think it’s important you first read a couple of biographies separately first.

When choosing a book about John and Paul, I think it’s very important to decide first what you want to know about them.

If you want the typical journalist/critic biography, an objective point of view of the facts, I suggest you ‘Many years from now’ for Paul, it’s seen as the almost official biography about Paul (even if last year Philip Norman has published a book about him too, more than 1,000 pages about Paul’s life. I haven’t read it yet but you can give it a look?)

If you want the perspective of someone close to them, which in my opinion is always the best choice, cause these are the people who really know what happened, I suggest you Mike McCartney’s book about his brother ‘The Macs, Mike McCartney’s family album’, he really does a good job showing his family roots, telling so many untold stories about Paul with never-seen-before pictures of the family. He tells the story from the beginning to now.

For John, the two suggestions are:

If you want the journalist/objective point of view, pick Philip Norman ‘John Lennon: The life’, he really was one of the first writers that tried to show a different image of the man everyone know, sometimes going into deep waters, showing his dark side. Philip Norman got critics from the papers and Yoko and Paul cause in the book he writes about John’s sexuality, his ‘love’ for Paul and his bisexuality, he really was one of the first journalist to try investigate about it and I think he did a really good job.

If you want a closer look, someone who’s been with him from childhood, pick Pete Shotton ‘John Lennon: In My life’, or Cynthia’s book ‘John’, or Julia Baird ‘Imagine this’. From all the 3 I rec you the first one, cause it’s the look of a friend, who doesn’t have resentments against someone so it’s a kinda objective point of view.

For a Mclennon book I rec you these, you can read here my reviews

- If you want to know more about the songs they wrote for each other, read ‘Lennon vs McCartney’ by Adam Thomas

- Powers of Two by Joshua Wolf Shank, for a psychoanalitic analysis of their creativity partnership

-Pick one from ‘Lennon-McCartney, the story of music’s greatest songwriting duo’ by Charles River or ‘John Lennon and Paul McCartney, their magic and their music’ by Bruce Glassman.

-‘The day John met Paul’ by Jim O’ Donnell is all about July 6 1957, the day they met. It‘s really nice.

Have fun! :)

9

July 6th 1957- The day John Lennon met Paul McCartney for the first time

“I just thought, ‘Well, he looks good, he’s singing well and he seems like a great lead singer to me.’ Of course, he had his glasses off, so he really looked suave. I remember John was good. He was really the only outstanding member, all the rest kind of slipped away.”- Paul when he met John for the first time

“I half thought to myself, He’s as good as me, I’d been kingpin up to then. Now, I thought, if I take him on, what will happen?”- John

“I still remember his beery old breath when I first met him here that day. But I soon came to love that beery old breath. And I loved John.”- Paul

“We were recording the other night, and I just wasn’t there. Neither was Paul. We were like two robots going through the motions. We do need each other alot. When we used to get together after a month off, we used to be embarrassed about touching each other. We’d do an elaborate handshake just to hide the embarrassment… or we did mad dances. Then we got to hugging each other.”- John

“John had his thing, and Paul had his, and together there were two different things all together. But they fit.”- Billy Preston

“Paul hits this chord, and I turn to him and say, That’s it! Do that again! In those days, we really used to write like that- both playing into each other’s noses.”- John

“One of my great memories of John is from when we were having some argument. I was disagreeing and we were calling each other names. We let it settle for a second and then he lowered his glasses and he said: "It’s only me.” And then he put his glasses back on again. To me, that was John. Those were the moments when I actually saw him without the facade, the armor, which I loved as well, like anyone else. It was a beautiful suit of armor. But it was wonderful when he let the visor down and you’d just see the John Lennon that he was frightened to reveal to the world.“- Paul

“Before John Lennon died I got back a good relationship with him. That was very special. The arguments we had didn’t matter. We were able to just take the piss about all those songs; they weren’t that harsh.”- Paul

“He was always saying, ‘I wonder what Paul is doing.’ When John and I were together, and this is about a week or two before our relationship ended, I remember him saying, ‘Do you think I should write with Paul again?’ I said, ‘Absolutely. You should because you want to. The two of you as solo performers are good, but together you can’t be beaten.”- May Pang

“Well, he’s like a brother. I love him. Families – we certainly have our ups and downs and our quarrels. But at the end of the day, when it’s all said and done, I would do anything for him, I think he would do anything for me.”- John, hours before his death

“I look in the mirror and think, ‘Nice one! You wrote songs with John Lennon on his porch, then you went to his bedroom and listened to Fats Domino and Elvis! How brilliant is that?’”- Paul

For a millisecond, they eye each other in motionless tableau - Lennon sitting, McCartney standing. Then their eyes meet squarely and, momentarily, you can practically hear the dust motes settle on Lennon’s guitar next to him on a chair. The sight each beholds is hardly astonishing: brown eyes, brown hair, average height, average weight… No, the astonishment would surge from something inside the two of them - something behind the eyes, under the hair, over the height, beyond the weight; something about a certain attitude toward a certain kind of music.
—  The Day John met Paul
When John and Paul met each other

           “That was the day, the day that I met Paul, that it started moving.” –John Lennon.

The Quarry Men was the Skiffle group featuring John Lennon, Pete Shotton, Eric Griffiths, Colin Hanton, Rod Davies, and Len Garry. They performed on the afternoon of 6th July 1957 at St Peter’s Church Fete, Woolton, Liverpool.

‘I remember coming into the fete and seeing all the sideshows. And also hearing all this great music wafting in from this little Tannoy system. It was John and the band.

 

I remember I was amazed and thought, ‘Oh great’, because I was obviously into the music. I remember John singing a song called Come Go With Me. He’d heard it on the radio. He didn’t really know the verses, but he knew the chorus. The rest he just made up himself.

 

I just thought, ‘Well, he looks good, he’s singing well and he seems like a great lead singer to me.’ Of course, he had his glasses off, so he really looked suave. I remember John was good. He was really the only outstanding member, all the rest kind of slipped away.’ –Paul McCartney, 1995.

It looks like a love at first sight story.

That evening, Ivan Vaughan (the Quarrymen’s sometime tea-chest bass player and John’s friend) introduced the band to one of his classmates from Liverpool Institute, that 15 little boy called Paul McCartney! So the magic happened… John Lennon and Paul McCartney met each other. Macca came wearing a white jacket with silver flecks to John, who wore a checked shirt. 

The pair chatted for a few minutes, and McCartney showed Lennon how to tune a guitar - the instruments owned by Lennon and Griffiths were in G banjo tuning. McCartney then sang Twenty Flight Rock.

 ‘Right off, I could see John was checking this kid out,’ says Pete Shotton (The Quarry Men), who was standing behind John, off to the side. ‘Paul came on as very attractive, very loose, very easy, very confident. – wildly confident. He played the guitar well. I could see that John was very impressed’. 

When I visited Liverpool, I had the chance to go at the St Peter’s church hall. And I saw this message that Paul sent to Church:

Ah yes, I remember it well.

 

I do, actually. My memory of meeting John for the first time is very clear. My mate Ivan Vaughan took me along to Woolton here and there were The Quarry Men, playing on a little platform.

I can still see John – checked shirt, slightly curly hair, singing Come Go With Me by The Del Vikings. He didn’t know all the words, so he was putting in stuff about penitentiaries – and making a good job of it.

I remember thinking ‘He looks good – I wouldn’t mind being in a group with him’.

A bit later we met up; I played him Twenty Flight Rock and he seemed pretty impressed – maybe because I DID know the words.

Then, as all you know, he asked me to join the group, and so we began our trip together. We wrote our first songs together, we grew up together and we lived our lives together.
And when we’d do it together, something special would happen. There’d be that little magic spark.

I still remember his beery old breath when I met him here that day. But I soon came to love that beery old breath. And I loved John. I always was and still am a great fan of John’s. We had a lot of fun together and I treasure all those beautiful memories.

 So I send you all in Woolton and Liddipool my best wishes today.

And thanks for remembering – there’s no way that when we met here we had any idea of what we’d be starting. But I’m very proud of what we did. And I’m very glad that I did it with John.

I hope you all have a wonderful day and God bless all who sail in you.

 

Paul McCartney

Thanks Lennon and McCartney. Thanks for everything you gave the world.

           “The most important day in his life was the day he met me” – Paul McCartney. 

Paul McCartney , age fifteen , stands stock-still on the warm grass. He’s as immobile as the black tuxed figure on the top of a wedding cake. It’s 4: 32 P.M. The air is toasty. The teenager hitches his thumbs in the pockets of his tight black pants . In his white jacket, he looks like one of his father’s pipe cleaners sticking halfway out of a dark tobacco pouch. The wide round face turns to Lennon and locks in: a rock and roll radar dish picking up a signal. His eyes, not quite tea-saucer size , are transfixed on the stage. He stares intently. McCartney’s brown diamond eyes mirror two John Lennons skating across their ice-watery surfaces.
—  ’Donnell, Jim (2006-11-06). The Day John Met Paul: An Hour-by-Hour Account of How the Beatles Began (p. 93). Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition. (given to me by my darling bewaremylove)

“I remember coming into the fete and seeing all the sideshows. And also hearing all this great music wafting in from this little Tannoy system. It was John and the band.

I remember I was amazed and thought, ‘Oh great’, because I was obviously into the music. I remember John singing a song called Come Go With Me. He’d heard it on the radio. He didn’t really know the verses, but he knew the chorus. The rest he just made up himself.

I just thought, ‘Well, he looks good, he’s singing well and he seems like a great lead singer to me.’ Of course, he had his glasses off, so he really looked suave. I remember John was good. He was really the only outstanding member, all the rest kind of slipped away”

- Paul McCartney about The Day John Met Paul

anonymous asked:

Hello fellow writer and McLennon brother. I have a question, how do you plan to start your book?

I want to start it with the story of how Julia & Alf met, and how Mary and Jim met. Then, move to the day John and Paul were born.