david-zimmerman

One Voice is a new series of photographic portraits of displaced Tibetan refugees by internationally acclaimed photographer David Zimmerman, who has spent the last 18 years making art, teaching photography and living in northern India.

According to the artist, the series examines the notion of place, which “is integral to the core of human existence in that it is central to our feelings of completeness, or lack thereof….Much is revealed about these displaced people through the expressions in their faces…their posture.”

One Voice will be on view at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, located in SoHo, NY, from October 10th to November 30th, 2013.

Law is embedded in and protects—intentionally and inadvertently–structures that are unequal—racially, sexually, and class wise. It is irrational to think that Zimmerman was culpable but not use the legal system to say so. White privilege must be held accountable for its criminality or, close the courts and the prisons.
—  Zillah Eisenstein, ‘Whose (In)Justice? Whose Tears? Whose Peace?’

Photographer David Zimmerman will discuss the stories of the men, women and children photographed for One Voice, a new body of haunting photographic portraits of displaced Tibetan refugees.

THE STORY BEHIND ONE VOICE
LECTURE BY DAVID ZIMMERMAN
MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 7 PM AT
SOUS LES ETOILES GALLERY, 560 BROADWAY

http://www.souslesetoilesgallery.net/

Barry Underwood, Horseshoe Lake, 2013
50x40 - Archival Pigment Print
Courtesy of the artist and Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, New York

GRAND FORMAT FROM THE COLLECTION

Exhibition on view until April 18, 2015 at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, Los Angeles Fair Exhibitor

560 Broadway, Suite 603, 10012 New York
T 12129660796
www.souslesetoilesgallery.net

A selection of grand format photographs from the Sous Les Etoiles Gallery collection, featuring work by abstract photographers Richard Caldicott and Jin-Ya Huang, architect and photographer Wolfram Ruoff, landscape light installation artist and photographer Barry Underwood, and L'Iris d'Or winner David Zimmerman.

David Zimmerman is 55 years old and will be traveling to Uzbekistan & Kazakhstan sometime later this year. He is really looking forward to it. 

MOSSLESS: Your creative practice began with the traditional arts. What led your decision to switch from sculpture and painting to photography? 
DAVID ZIMMERMAN: In some ways, I really haven’t switched. I still do work in sculpture some, primarily for myself, and much of what I photograph I consider closely related to creating sculpture, but with a camera instead of my hands. I have gone much farther with photography though and feel that photography gives me more freedom to work with social and environmental issues as well as studies of form and texture and light.

ML: The biggest environmental issue currently is the oil spill in the Gulf Coast. Recently, you have made portraits of the people directly affected by the disaster, with a style similar to Richard Avedon’s In The American West. What was that experience like? And why the cloth backdrop instead of the actual landscape?
DZ: The BP oil spill has had a devastating impact on the people of the Gulf region. Many experts believe it could be decades before the region is fully restored, and the future of many who live there remains uncertain.

I spent weeks immediately after the spill photographing the landscape drenched with oil; the marshes silently dying. The devastation I saw off-shore reflected in the faces of the people on-shore. I knew then it was the stories of the people I wanted to tell.
I use an 8x10 view camera for all of the portraits. Using a large camera slows down the entire process and the simple canvas backdrop helps focus what I’m looking for in the eyes and the hands and the gesture, which for me, tell the story. It was important for me to limit elements and a myriad of stylistic choices when it came to the background and the environment. My intention was not to editorialize or to create a photograph that reflected on me, as a photographer, as much as it did on the people. They are snapshots in a sense, as a record of a people at a moment in time.  I plan to print life-size, and the 8x10 film will give me nearly lifelike detail, making the people as real as a photograph can be.

The rather slow process also created more opportunities to talk, and I have recorded many hours of conversation. Gaining the trust of people inundated with media racing to meet a deadline takes time, and so we sat for hours listening to their stories.

ML: Taking time to understand a subject seems to be a continuing element in your work. How was your patience tested during the making of your Desert series? What was the average time span for each photograph?
DZ: I think about the many times I’ve been in India working on my Ganges River project and about all the time I spent waiting and watching and listening to the things and people around me. The waiting almost always showed me something I would have missed. No matter where I am, it seems that the waiting and observing lets the world around me revolve as though I wasn’t even there. And by staying in one spot for long periods I can observe even more closely the details and relationships in a place.
The desert photographs sometimes took several days each. When I find a location I often go back to it many times as the light and weather changes.

ML: Favorite time of day? 
DZ: I love the time an hour before sunrise and an hour or two after sunset. The light is soft, the colors are muted and many places I go take on a very quiet nature.

Photographer David Zimmerman will discuss the stories of the men, women and children photographed for One Voice, a new body of haunting photographic portraits of displaced Tibetan refugees.

THE STORY BEHIND ONE VOICE
LECTURE BY DAVID ZIMMERMAN
MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 7 PM AT
SOUS LES ETOILES GALLERY, 560 BROADWAY

http://www.souslesetoilesgallery.net/