david-brooks

I’ve come to think that flourishing consists of putting yourself in situations in which you lose self-consciousness and become fused with other people, experiences, or tasks. It happens sometimes when you are lost in a hard challenge, or when an artist or a craftsman becomes one with the brush or the tool. It happens sometimes while you’re playing sports, or listening to music or lost in a story, or to some people when they feel enveloped by God’s love. And it happens most when we connect with other people. I’ve come to think that happiness isn’t really produced by conscious accomplishments. Happiness is a measure of how thickly the unconscious parts of our minds are intertwined with other people and with activities. Happiness is determined by how much information and affection flows through us covertly every day and year.
—  David Brooks
For Augustine, that’s the crucial change. Knowledge is not enough for tranquillity and goodness because it doesn’t contain the motivation to be good. Only love impels action. We don’t become better because we acquire new information. We become better because we acquire better loves. We don’t become what we know. Education is a process of love formation. When you go to a school, it should offer you new things to love
—  David Brooks, The Road to Character.

By Trump’s own account, he knows more about aircraft carrier technology than the Navy. According to his interview with The Economist, he invented the phrase “priming the pump” (even though it was famous by 1933). Trump is not only trying to deceive others. His falsehoods are attempts to build a world in which he can feel good for an instant and comfortably deceive himself.

He is thus the all-time record-holder of the Dunning-Kruger effect, the phenomenon in which the incompetent person is too incompetent to understand his own incompetence. Trump thought he’d be celebrated for firing James Comey. He thought his press coverage would grow wildly positive once he won the nomination. He is perpetually surprised because reality does not comport with his fantasies.

— 

David Brooks, “When the World Is Led by a Child.”

Damn! When the resident neocon for the New York Times calls you out on your gross incompetence, you know you’ve done f***ed up as president!

nytimes.com
When the World Is Led by a Child
Reports that President Trump betrayed an intelligence source reveal the dangerousness of an immature man.
By David Brooks

Come on, David Brooks, TELL US HOW YOU REALLY FEEL

[Trump] is thus the all-time record-holder of the Dunning-Kruger effect, the phenomenon in which the incompetent person is too incompetent to understand his own incompetence.

… Which brings us to the reports that Trump betrayed an intelligence source and leaked secrets to his Russian visitors. From all we know so far, Trump didn’t do it because he is a Russian agent, or for any malevolent intent. He did it because he is sloppy, because he lacks all impulse control, and above all because he is a 7-year-old boy desperate for the approval of those he admires.

The Russian leak story reveals one other thing, the dangerousness of a hollow man.

… Trump’s statements don’t necessarily come from anywhere, lead anywhere or have a permanent reality beyond his wish to be liked at any given instant.

We’ve got this perverse situation in which the vast analytic powers of the entire world are being spent trying to understand a guy whose thoughts are often just six fireflies beeping randomly in a jar.

😂😂😂😂😂😂😂 This guy is a conservative, BTW, albeit one of the last surviving members of the moderate wing after the teabaggers brought about their Extinction Event 😂😂😂😂

The point of being a teacher is to do more than impart facts, it’s to shape the way students perceive the world, to help a student absorb the rules of a discipline. The teachers who do that get remembered.
—  David Brooks, The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement
I’ve come to think that flourishing consists of putting yourself in situations in which you lose self-consciousness and become fused with other people, experiences, or tasks. It happens sometimes when you are lost in a hard challenge, or when an artist or a craftsman becomes one with the brush or the tool. It happens sometimes while you’re playing sports, or listening to music or lost in a story, or to some people when they feel enveloped by God’s love. And it happens most when we connect with other people. I’ve come to think that happiness isn’t really produced by conscious accomplishments. Happiness is a measure of how thickly the unconscious parts of our minds are intertwined with other people and with activities. Happiness is determined by how much information and affection flows through us covertly every day and year.
—  David Brooks
We can choose the narratives we tell about our lives. We’re born into cultures, nations, and languages that we didn’t choose. We’re born with certain brain chemicals and genetic predispositions that we can’t control. We’re sometimes thrust into social conditions that we detest. But among all things we don’t control, we do have some control over our stories. We do have a conscious say in selecting the narratives we will use to organize our perception.
—  The Social Animal by David Brooks p 291
People who succeed tend to find one goal in the distant future and then chase it through thick and thin. People who flit from one interest to another are much, much less likely to excel at any of them. School asks students to be good at a range of subjects, but life asks people to find one passion that they will follow forever.
—  David Brooks, The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources Of Love, Character, And Achievement
A las personas no les va mejor si se les otorga la máxima libertad personal de hacer lo que les plazca; les va mejor cuando tienen que atender compromisos que trascienden sus intereses personales: compromisos con la familia, con Dios, con su trabajo y con el país.
—  David Brooks
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I had the pleasure to “illustrate” a beautiful and insightful article by David Brooks that appeared in last Sunday’s NYT Review. Many thanks to Art Director Aviva Michaelov. 

The first piece is a sculpture made out of polymer clay and painted with acrylic, the second is a ceramic sculpture glazed in matte white and colored in the computer. I went to drop off the pieces at the New York Times building in Times Square, and Tony Cenicola photographed them in the studio . It’s the first time I have been commissioned a sculpture as an illustration; amazing experience!