david-brooks

Rubio is drowning in the tired and worthless ‘Obama is the weakest/Obama is the most powerful tyrant ever” GOP bullshit. Republicans have spent eights years trying to tell their voters to fear Obama. The GOP-version of Obama does not exist. Never did. Never will.

To quote conservative NYT columnist David Brooks from today’s “I Miss Barack Obama” op-ed

Obama radiates an ethos of integrity, humanity, good manners & elegance.”

I’ve come to think that flourishing consists of putting yourself in situations in which you lose self-consciousness and become fused with other people, experiences, or tasks. It happens sometimes when you are lost in a hard challenge, or when an artist or a craftsman becomes one with the brush or the tool. It happens sometimes while you’re playing sports, or listening to music or lost in a story, or to some people when they feel enveloped by God’s love. And it happens most when we connect with other people. I’ve come to think that happiness isn’t really produced by conscious accomplishments. Happiness is a measure of how thickly the unconscious parts of our minds are intertwined with other people and with activities. Happiness is determined by how much information and affection flows through us covertly every day and year.
—  David Brooks
David Brooks' Utter Ignorance About Inequality
Occasionally David Brooks, who personifies the oxymoron “conservative thinker” better than anyone I know, displays such profound ignorance that a rejoinder is necessary lest his illogic permanently pollute public debate. Such is the case with his New York Times column last Friday, arguing that we should be focusing on the “interrelated social problems of the poor” rather than on inequality, and that the two are fundamentally distinct. Baloney.   First, when almost all the gains from growth go to the top, as they have for the last thirty years, the middle class doesn’t have the purchasing power necessary for buoyant growth. Once the middle class has exhausted all its coping mechanisms – wives and mothers surging into paid work (as they did in the 1970s and 1980s), longer working hours (which characterized the 1990s), and deep indebtedness (2002 to 2008) – the inevitable result is fewer jobs and slow growth, as we continue to experience. Few jobs and slow growth hit the poor especially hard because they’re the first to be fired, last to be hired, and most likely to bear the brunt of declining wages and benefits.   Second, when the middle class is stressed, it has a harder time being generous to those in need. The “interrelated social problems” of the poor presumably will require some money, but the fiscal cupboard is bare. And because the middle class is so financially insecure, it doesn’t want to, nor does it feel it can afford to, pay more in taxes.   Third, America’s shrinking middle class also hobbles upward mobility. Not only is there less money for good schools, job training, and social services, but the poor face a more difficult challenge moving upward because the income ladder is far longer than it used to be, and its middle rungs have disappeared.   Brooks also argues that we should not be talking about unequal political power, because such utterances cause divisiveness and make it harder to reach political consensus over what to do for the poor.   Hogwash. The concentration of power at the top – which flows largely from the concentration of income and wealth there – has prevented  Washington from dealing with the problems of the poor and the middle class. To the contrary, as wealth has accumulated at the top, Washington has reduced taxes on the wealthy, expanded tax loopholes that disproportionately benefit the rich, deregulated Wall Street, and provided ever larger subsidies, bailouts, and tax breaks for large corporations. The only things that have trickled down to the middle and poor besides fewer jobs and smaller paychecks are public services that are increasingly inadequate because they’re starved for money.   Unequal political power is the endgame of widening inequality – its most noxious and nefarious consequence, and the most fundamental threat to our democracy. Big money has now all but engulfed Washington and many state capitals – drowning out the voices of average Americans, filling the campaign chests of candidates who will do their bidding, financing attacks on organized labor, and bankrolling a vast empire of right-wing think-tanks and publicists that fill the airwaves with half-truths and distortions.   That David Brooks, among the most thoughtful of all conservative pundits, doesn’t see or acknowledge any of this is a sign of how far the right has moved away from the reality most Americans live in every day. 
I’ve come to think that flourishing consists of putting yourself in situations in which you lose self-consciousness and become fused with other people, experiences, or tasks. It happens sometimes when you are lost in a hard challenge, or when an artist or a craftsman becomes one with the brush or the tool. It happens sometimes while you’re playing sports, or listening to music or lost in a story, or to some people when they feel enveloped by God’s love. And it happens most when we connect with other people. I’ve come to think that happiness isn’t really produced by conscious accomplishments. Happiness is a measure of how thickly the unconscious parts of our minds are intertwined with other people and with activities. Happiness is determined by how much information and affection flows through us covertly every day and year.
—  David Brooks
I’ve come to think that flourishing consists of putting yourself in situations in which you lose self-consciousness and become fused with other people, experiences, or tasks. It happens sometimes when you are lost in a hard challenge, or when an artist or a craftsman becomes one with the brush or the tool. It happens sometimes while you’re playing sports, or listening to music or lost in a story, or to some people when they feel enveloped by God’s love. And it happens most when we connect with other people. I’ve come to think that happiness isn’t really produced by conscious accomplishments. Happiness is a measure of how thickly the unconscious parts of our minds are intertwined with other people and with activities. Happiness is determined by how much information and affection flows through us covertly every day and year.
—  David Brooks
A las personas no les va mejor si se les otorga la máxima libertad personal de hacer lo que les plazca; les va mejor cuando tienen que atender compromisos que trascienden sus intereses personales: compromisos con la familia, con Dios, con su trabajo y con el país.
—  David Brooks
The résumé virtues are the ones you list on your résumé, the skills that you bring to the job market and that contribute to external success. The eulogy virtues are deeper. They’re the virtues that get talked about at your funeral, the ones that exist at the core of your being — whether you are kind, brave, honest or faithful; what kind of relationships you formed. Most of us would say that the eulogy virtues are more important than the résumé virtues, but … most of us have clearer strategies for how to achieve career success than we do for how to develop a profound character.
—  David Brooks on cultivating the “eulogy virtues” of character – an enormously insightful and important read.
vox.com
David Brooks: The Republican Party is producing "leaders of jaw-dropping incompetence"
"These insurgents are incompetent at governing and unwilling to be governed."
By Ezra Klein

This article explains exactly why the Republican party descended into madness, and what is wrong with their party currently. Explains a good bit for those unfamiliar with Republican history and what conservatism should be.

Neo-cons lied about WMD, outsourced the war to #Blackwater and contractor cronies, never budgeted for the occupation, instagated the insurgency when their plot to protect only the oil became apparent, and never thought anyone would notice their horrible foreign policy.

Add stop-loss back door drafts, abusing the troops by not having armor for vehicles, the complete disregard for veterans, and you get the picture.

David Brooks never ONCE criticized Bush and Cheney. These right wing pundits are beyond shame. Zero integrity.

DAVID BROOKS'S 10 FAVORITE BOOKS

In a two-part New York Times piece, columnist David Brooks offers 10 of his favorite books as a summer reading list:

  1. A Collection of Essays by George Orwell
  2. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  3. Rationalism in Politics by Michael Oakeshott
  4. All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren
  5. The Peloponnesian War by Thucydides
  6. The Confessions by St. Augustine
  7. The Lonely Man of Faith by Joseph Soloveitchik
  8. Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl
  9. Endless Love by Scott Spencer
  10. Middlemarch by George Eliot

(The patriarchy seems alive and well.)

Complement with more reading lists from Brian Eno, David Bowie, Stewart Brand, Carl Sagan, and yours truly.

Neil Jussila, Black Sound (2006), acrylic on canvas

Read this very closely. 

Take interest in what you have interest in. Do not be a slave to general zeitgeist, memetic net culture OR fandom juggernauts. Take interest in only that which interests you. Fuck everything else and anyone that would deride you for your interest or call you pretentious for what you love. Take interest in that which is particular to you.

Go find the things you love. Find what it is about them you love, how they were made, who made them. Go to the places those things come from and trace them to where they end up. Even in those moments where you feel like it separates you from other people, keep going.

Eventually you will find what it is about you that causes you to like these things and at that point you will find the core operators of an idea called ‘self’. Once you have found that point you will have found those people to share that core with. Take part in that feedback loop.

Learn to, as NYT Op-Ed columnist David Brooks put’s it:

 "…appreciate the tremendous power of particularity. If your identity is formed by hard boundaries, if your concerns are expressed through a specific paracosm, you are going to have more depth and definition than you are if you grew up in the far-flung networks of pluralism and eclecticism, surfing from one spot to the next, sampling one style then the next, your identity formed by soft boundaries, or none at all.“ 

It is good to be particular, for particularity is difficult; that something is difficult must be a reason the more for us to do it. 

now, reblog this and spread the word.