david petraeus

politico.com
Why Trump is so obsessed with generals
The president-elect is infatuated with martial swagger and Hollywood’s Patton — which is why he's filling his Cabinet with top military brass. By SHANE GOLDMACHER

As President-elect Donald Trump began building the top tier of his administration, he has turned to friends and advisers to ask just how many generals would be too many — suggesting he may want to tap as many as five — to fill his Cabinet and the highest rungs of the White House.

He’s already up to three, with retired generals in crucial national security posts: secretary of defense (James Mattis), secretary of homeland security (John Kelly) and national security adviser (Michael Flynn). On Thursday, Trump interviewed retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis for secretary of state, one of two military men among the finalists to become the nation’s top diplomat along with former Gen. David Petraeus.

Even before all his picks are finalized, Trump is on pace to assemble the most military-heavy White House and civilian administration since at least World War II.

Military leaders have long held a special allure for Trump, according to people who have spoken to the president-elect both during the formation of his Cabinet and in the years before, including some Hollywood portrayals.

“Frankly, he’s way too impressed in the generals,” said one confidant of Trump, who attended a military academy in high school but never joined in the armed services, instead receiving draft deferments during the Vietnam War. “The more braid you have on your shoulders and the more laurels that you have on your visor, the more impressed he is.”

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bbc.com
Robert Harward 'turns down' Trump's national security adviser offer - BBC News
Retired Vice-Admiral Robert Harward wanted to bring in his own team, US media report.

BBC News:

Retired Vice-Admiral Robert Harward was widely tipped for the post after Mr Trump fired Michael Flynn on Monday.

A White House official said Mr Harward cited family and financial commitments, but US media said the sticking point was he wanted to bring in his own team.

Mr Flynn had misled US Vice-President Mike Pence over his conversations with Russia’s ambassador to the US.

Mr Harward, a 60-year-old former Navy Seal, is currently based in Abu Dhabi where he is chief executive of US defence contractor Lockheed Martin’s United Arab Emirates operations.

Two other contenders - retired General David Petraeus and acting national security adviser Keith Kellogg - have also been tipped to take on the job.

politico.com
White House searching for potential replacements for Flynn
David Petraeus is scheduled to meet with the president, sources said. By TARA PALMERI and ELI STOKOLS

President Donald Trump’s adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is involved in a search for candidates to replace Michael Flynn, according to sources close to the administration, even as the president’s senior advisers publicly continue to send mixed signals about the fate of the embattled national security adviser.

“They are trying to figure out the solution to Flynn right now,” said one of the sources. “The problem is they don’t have it yet. They need to get a solution. You can’t have a firing without an immediate replacement. You need a plan.”

The situation remained fluid Monday night as a source familiar with the situation said that former acting Attorney General Sally Yates had briefed Donald McGahn, chief White House counsel, on Flynn’s apparent misstatements about his discussions with the Russians. Yates was dismissed a few days later — after refusing to enforce Trump’s travel ban executive order — but the source said her briefing on Flynn did not appear to play a role in her firing. The news was first reported by the Washington Post.

Amid this news, the list of possible replacements includes retired Gen. David Petraeus, who’s scheduled to meet with Trump at the White House on Tuesday, according to two people familiar with the plans. Other possibilities: Stephen Hadley, who served as national security adviser under President George W. Bush; Tom Bossert, who also served as a national security aide under Bush and now oversees cybersecurity under Trump; Adm. James Stavridis, dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts; and Department of Homeland Security head John Kelly.

Petraeus was briefly considered for secretary of state during the transition but was passed over in part because of his 2015 conviction for mishandling classified information.

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If any of us without Petraeus’ resources and connections were charged with the same thing, we would be looking at years behind bars.
–Andrew Peeler

What he did was stupid, and he is paying dearly for this lapse. Of course he needs to be slapped around for his behavior, but he didn’t start World War III. Let it go! I’m sure he has already suffered enough.
–Nancy Kaylor

The Justice Department reached a plea deal with ex-CIA director David Petraeus over sharing classified information with his mistress and biographer. The plea deal for Petraeus, a retired four-star general, recommended two years of probation and a $40,000 fine.

Our readers discussed the deal and their opinion of Petraeus. Check out what else our readers had to say and share your opinion in this #tellusatoday.

politico.com
Petraeus: '5 years ago, I made a serious mistake'
By NOLAN D. MCCASKILL

David Petraeus owned his “mistake” Sunday, leaving it in the hands of the Senate to determine whether his guilty plea for providing classified information to his lover is disqualifying should he be nominated to serve as secretary of state.

“Five years ago, I made a serious mistake. I acknowledged it, I apologized for it, I paid a very heavy price for it, and I’ve learned from it,” Petraeus said on ABC’s “This Week.” “And, again, they’ll have to factor that in and also, obviously, 38 ½ years of otherwise fairly, in some cases, unique service to our country in uniform and at the CIA and some four years or so in the business community during which I’ve continued to travel the world — nearly 40 countries — in that time as well.”

Petraeus, a retired general and former CIA director, is on President-elect Donald Trump’s short list to head the State Department. Should Trump tap him as secretary of state, he would likely have to answer questions about leaking classified information to biographer Paula Broadwell in confirmation hearings that would come after a campaign that saw Trump repeatedly hammer former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for her own handling of classified information.

Trump maintained that Clinton did far worse than Petraeus, but it was Petraeus who pleaded guilty and was sentenced to two years’ probation and a $100,000 fine. FBI Director James Comey recommended no charges against Clinton to the Justice Department, despite what he called her “extremely careless” handling of sensitive information.

Petraeus admitted to making a false statement to the FBI, although “at the time I didn’t think it was false,” he said. But he also stressed that the FBI found that nothing in the journals he shared “ended up in the biography or made it out to the public.”

“I made a mistake. I have, again, acknowledged it,” he said. “Folks will have to factor that in and determine whether that is indeed disqualifying or not.”

Petraeus also said he didn’t vote for Trump — or anyone else, for that matter.

“I don’t vote, so that’s an easy answer, and I also did not support him nor did I oppose him. Nor did I support or oppose any other candidate,” he said. “I’ve truly tried to be apolitical, nonpolitical.”

politico.com
Trump gives Petraeus a pass
The candidate who threatened to lock up Clinton for mishandling classified information considers a retired general who pleaded guilty to leaking secrets to be his top diplomat. By BRYAN BENDER

Donald Trump said Hillary Clinton’s use of a private server for classified State Department emails made her unfit for high office. But that isn’t stopping him from considering David Petraeus, who plead guilty to knowingly leaking secret government files — and lying to the feds about it — for secretary of state.

Trump’s hourlong meeting Monday with Petraeus, a retired general and former CIA director, to discuss the cabinet position is the latest in the president-elect’s outreach to retired military leaders who have clashed with President Barack Obama on foreign policy and national security.

But it also calls into question the sincerity of Trump’s stance on the importance of safeguarding the nation’s secrets, according to former government officials and intelligence experts – a stance that was driven home with campaign-trail chants of “lock her up.“

"The very consideration of Petraeus for a senior position reveals that the Trump campaign’s rhetoric regarding Hillary Clinton was totally bogus,” said Steven Aftergood, a specialist on government classification at the Federation of American Scientists. “Candidate Trump was generating hysteria over Clinton’s handling or mishandling of classified information that he likely never believed or took seriously himself.

"Petraeus admitted lying to the FBI, which distinguished his case from Clinton’s and made his case a good deal worse,” Aftergood added. “I think once again President-elect Trump is revealed as a rather hypocritical figure.”

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MAJOR FIGURES OF THE ONGOING TRUMP CRISIS PART 2

PART 1 HERE.

STEPHEN MILLER

  • GRADUALLY HAVING LIFE SUCKED FROM HIS BODY.
  • HOPES TO STEAL THE ONE RING BACK FROM TRUMP.
  • CARRIES FORGED DOCUMENTS PROVING HE’S HUMAN.

MITCH MCCONNELL

  • FIRST SERVED IN THE SENATE DURING THE ROMAN REPUBLIC, USED FAKE ID TO WIN TERM IN THE AMERICAN ONE.
  • HAS VAST COLLECTION OF HATS DESIGNED AFTER HIS OWN ASS.
  • WORLD’S LEAST ADEPT CHARACTER ASSASSIN.

KELLYANNE CONWAY

  • LITERAL CAPTAIN AMERICA VILLAIN.
  • SECRETLY STARRED IN EVERY SINGLE SEXIST BLONDE JOKE YOU’VE EVER HEARD.
  • SAMPLE QUOTE: “STOP KINKSHAMING MY WHITE NATIONALISM FETISH!”

DAVID PETRAEUS

  • LITERAL CAPTAIN MARVEL VILLAIN. (ANY VERSION, ANY COMPANY.)
  • POSSIBLE SECOND PICK FOR NATIONAL SECURITY LEAKER IN CHIEF.
  • MAY BE UNABLE TO TAKE JOB IF HIS PROBATION OFFICER TELLS HIM NO.

MICHAEL FLYNN

  • LITERAL CAPTAIN PLANET VILLAIN.
  • TRUMP’S INITIAL LEAKER IN CHIEF, NOW DEPARTING IN CLOUD OF IGNOMINY AND SHAME.
  • HAS DEEP-SEATED FEAR OF LINKA.

CHRIS COLLINS

  • TEST SUBJECT FOR EXPERIMENTAL SPINE-ECTOMY PROCESS, LATER USED ON RYAN.
  • SMILE DOESN’T SHOW JOY, JUST TEETH.
  • FEARS TOWN HALLS AND WIND POWER.
politico.com
Snowden says Petraeus got off lightly
By REBECCA MORIN

Edward Snowden criticized the U.S. justice system Sunday, using David Petraeus, who shared classified information with his biographer and lover, as an example of those “well-connected to government” getting “very light punishments.”

“We have a two-tiered system of justice in the United States where people who are either well-connected to government or they have access to an incredible amount of resources, get very light punishments,” Snowden told Katie Couric, global anchor of Yahoo News, in a clip released Sunday, comparing those people to “inner-city youth” who “will be very much tread upon by our justice system.”

Snowden is a former NSA contractor who leaked thousands of documents about government surveillance. He remains a fugitive, in exile in Russia.

Snowden said what Petraeus did was more serious than what he did.

Petraeus, Snowden said, "shared information that was far more highly classified than I ever did with journalists. And he shared this information not with the public for their benefit, but with his biographer and lover for personal benefit conversations that had information, detailed information, about military special access programs that’s classified above top secret, conversations with the president, and so on.”

Petraeus, a retired general and former CIA director who is on President-elect Donald Trump’s short list for secretary of state, leaked classified information to biographer Paula Broadwell. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to probation for two years and fined $100,000.

“When the government came after him, they charged him with a misdemeanor. He never spent a single day in jail, despite the type of classified information he exposed,” Snowden said.

On Sunday, Petraeus acknowledged his “mistake.”

“Five years ago, I made a serious mistake. I acknowledged it, I apologized for it, I paid a very heavy price for it, and I’ve learned from it,” Petraeus said on ABC’s “This Week.”

politico.com
Trump says he's considering Kellogg and three others for NSA
By MADELINE CONWAY

President Donald Trump said Friday that he is considering keeping Keith Kellogg on as his permanent national security adviser, but there are also three other names “in play” to succeed Michael Flynn, who was ousted from the job on Monday.

Trump signaled his interest in Kellogg, a retired Army lieutenant general, in a tweet: “General Keith Kellogg, who I have known for a long time, is very much in play for NSA - as are three others,” he said.

The president tapped Kellogg to fill the national security adviser role on an interim basis after the unceremonious departure of Flynn, who was asked to resign in the wake of reports that he had improperly discussed sanctions on Russia with the country’s ambassador and then misled the public and Vice President Mike Pence about it.

The administration asked retired Vice Admiral Robert Harward to succeed Flynn, but he turned down the offer. Harward released a statement Thursday saying that he could not commit the time necessary to the position, but an individual familiar with his thinking told POLITICO that he said no because of concerns about staffing and his autonomy in the job.

White House chief of staff Reince Priebus acknowledged Harward’s decision in an interview with Fox News on Friday morning, but he, too, insisted that he chose not to take the job for personal reasons. His family wasn’t fully on board, Priebus said.

Some national security figures previously said they doubted that Kellogg would fill the NSA job permanently. One retired general who has known Kellogg for decades, Barry McCaffrey, told POLITICO early Tuesday that Kellogg is a “good man” but predicted that “he won’t be the selection.”

One name thrown around has been former CIA director David Petraeus, who was scheduled to meet with Trump this week. Two White House officials told POLITICO on Monday night that his higher profile and personal baggage hurt his initial chances, though.

The vacancy on the National Security Council is not the only problem Flynn’s ouster has created for the administration. It has also renewed scrutiny into Trump’s relationship with Russia, particularly in light of other reports that his campaign associates were in contact with the country prior to the election.

Trump said Thursday that he is not aware of any contact between Russia and his campaign before the election, though he did not definitively rule it out.

JUST IN: CIA Director Petraeus resigns, citing extra-marital affair

CIA Director David Petraeus has submitted his letter of resignation to President Obama, citing an extra-marital affair, NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell reported today on msnbc.

UPDATE (3:12 p.m. ET): Read NBC News’ story and follow updates on this story on BreakingNews.com.

Photo: Then-U.S. Army Gen. David Petraeus speaks during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in June 2010. (Brendan Smialowski / Getty Images)

“Lighten up, Dave. It was an ironic mailbomb.” – somebody

4 Pranksters Who Have No Clue How Pranks Work

#3. A Friend of General Petraeus Sends a Fake Grenade to His Office

Since Petraeus had long since reached the echelon of employment that excuses him from opening his own mail, the admittedly hilarious dummy explosive was received by his secretary, who immediately called the police because it looked like a real grenade, and killing Petraeus with a hand grenade is something a terrorist would do.

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David Petraeus unanimously confirmed as new CIA chief
  • 94-0 Senate vote confirming Petraeus as CIA director source

» The big shuffle continues: With Robert Gates’ retirement, and Leon Panetta imminently poised to become the new Secretary of Defense, the Senate has voted to confirm General David Petaeus to take Panetta’s old job. Petraeus had been serving as the Commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, but will be departing to become the number one man of the government agency we all think of when we think about high-level secrecy. Of note in this confirmation — ninety-four to nothing! Even in a thoroughly divided Washington, it’s clear Petraeus is still one of the most politically popular people to stand in support of, no matter the political party.

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Fred Kaplan tells Dave Davies about one of the challenges General Petraeus faced in Afghanistan:

The problem was, by his own admission, he knew nothing about Afghanistan. He’d been in Iraq three times. He knew that place well. He comes in and what’s in his mind is Iraq. So his aides would say, “You know, we have a problem here,” and he would say …. “Well, you know, we did this in Mosul,” or “What worked in Anbar was this … .” I was told that in a meeting with President Karzai once, Karzai laid out a problem and [Petraeus] said, “Well, you know, in Baghdad we did it like this …” to the president of Afghanistan. And the aide who was with Petraeus in the room — who had been both in Afghanistan and Iraq — when they were walking out he said, “You know, it might be an interesting intellectual experiment for you to not even think about Iraq.” and Petraeus said, “I’m working on it.”

Image by E_T 2008 via Flickr