david ogilvy

David Ogilvy: How I made ads.

April 19, 1955

Dear Mr. Calt:

On March 22nd you wrote to me asking for some notes on my work habits as a copywriter. They are appalling, as you are about to see:

1. I have never written an advertisement in the office. Too many interruptions. I do all my writing at home. 

2. I spend a long time studying the precedents. I look at every advertisement which has appeared for competing products during the past 20 years. 

3. I am helpless without research material—and the more “motivational” the better. 

4. I write out a definition of the problem and a statement of the purpose which I wish the campaign to achieve. Then I go no further until the statement and its principles have been accepted by the client. 

5. Before actually writing the copy, I write down every concievable fact and selling idea. Then I get them organized and relate them to research and the copy platform. 

6. Then I write the headline. As a matter of fact I try to write 20 alternative headlines for every advertisement. And I never select the final headline without asking the opinion of other people in the agency. In some cases I seek the help of the research department and get them to do a split-run on a battery of headlines. 

7. At this point I can no longer postpone the actual copy. So I go home and sit down at my desk. I find myself entirely without ideas. I get bad-tempered. If my wife comes into the room I growl at her. (This has gotten worse since I gave up smoking.)

8. I am terrified of producing a lousy advertisement. This causes me to throw away the first 20 attempts. 

9. If all else fails, I drink half a bottle of rum and play a Handel oratorio on the gramophone. This generally produces an uncontrollable gush of copy. 

10. The next morning I get up early and edit the gush.

11. Then I take the train to New York and my secretary types a draft. (I cannot type, which is very inconvenient.)

12. I am a lousy copywriter, but I am a good editor. So I go to work editing my own draft. After four or five editings, it looks good enough to show to the client. If the client changes the copy, I get angry—because I took a lot of trouble writing it, and what I wrote I wrote on purpose. 

Altogether it is a slow and laborious business. I understand that some copywriters have much greater facility. 

Yours sincerely, 

D.O.

youtube

David Ogilvy essentials - The best from the great man, condensed into a 4 minute video. essential watching for anyone in our business.. 

1) I admire people who work hard, who bite the bullet…

2) I admire people with first-class brains,…but brains are not enough unless they are combined with intellectual honesty…

3) I have an inviolable rule against employing nepots and spouses, because they breed politics…

4) I admire people who work with gusto…

5) I despise toadies who suck up to their bosses; they are generally the same people who bully their subordinates.

6) I admire self-confident professionals, the craftsmen who do their jobs with superlative excellence…

7) I admire people who hire subordinates who are good enough to succeed them…

8) I admire people who build up their subordinates…

9) I admire people with gentle manners who treat other people as human beings…

—  in david ogilvy’s book “confessions of an advertising man” he lists what he admires in his workers (this is an abridged version)
21 Harsh But Eye-Opening Writing Tips From Great Authors
1. The first draft of everything is shit. -Ernest Hemingway 2. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize, demassification, attitudinally, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass. -David Ogilvy 3. If you have any young friends who aspire to become writers, the second greatest favor you can do them is to present them with copies of The Elements of Style. The first greatest, of course, is to shoot them now, while they’re happy. – Dorothy Parker 4. Notice how many of the Olympic athletes effusively thanked their mothers for their success? “She drove me to my practice at four in the morning,” etc. Writing is not figure skating or skiing. Your mother will not make you a writer. My advice to any young person who wants to write is: leave home. -Paul Theroux 5. I would advise anyone who aspires to a writing career that before developing his talent he would be wise to develop a thick hide. — Harper Lee 6. You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. ― Jack London 7. Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout with some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand. — George Orwell 8. There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. ― W. Somerset Maugham 9. If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time — or the tools — to write. Simple as that. – Stephen King 10. Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. – Neil Gaiman 11. Imagine that you are dying. If you had a terminal disease would you finish this book? Why not? The thing that annoys this 10-weeks-to-live self is the thing that is wrong with the book. So change it. Stop arguing with yourself. Change it. See? Easy. And no one had to die. – Anne Enright 12. If writing seems hard, it’s because it is hard. It’s one of the hardest things people do. – William Zinsser 13. Here is a lesson in creative writing. First rule: Do not use semicolons. They are transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing. All they do is show you’ve been to college. – Kurt Vonnegut 14. Prose is architecture, not interior decoration. – Ernest Hemingway 15. Write drunk, edit sober. – Ernest Hemingway 16. Get through a draft as quickly as possible. Hard to know the shape of the thing until you have a draft. Literally, when I wrote the last page of my first draft of Lincoln’s Melancholy I thought, Oh, shit, now I get the shape of this. But I had wasted years, literally years, writing and re-writing the first third to first half. The old writer’s rule applies: Have the courage to write badly. – Joshua Wolf Shenk 17. Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. – Mark Twain 18. Start telling the stories that only you can tell, because there’ll always be better writers than you and there’ll always be smarter writers than you. There will always be people who are much better at doing this or doing that — but you are the only you.― Neil Gaiman 19. Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative. – Oscar Wilde 20. You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you. ― Ray Bradbury 21. Don’t take anyone’s writing advice too seriously.– Lev Grossman

Source:  http://thoughtcatalog.com/cody-delistraty/2013/09/21-harsh-but-eye-opening-writing-tips-from-great-authors/